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50 mg zoloft and weed

What to know about sertraline

Sertraline belongs to a class of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

Sertraline is sold under the brand name Zoloft, and there are also generic versions. It is available at most pharmacies.

Healthcare professionals can prescribe over 30 medications intended to help with depression and improve a person’s quality of life.

Sertraline is sold under the brand name Zoloft, and there are also generic versions. It is available at most pharmacies.

Share on Pinterest Sertraline increases the amount of serotonin that is available in the brain.
Image credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zoloft_50_mg_(CN).JPG, 2012

Sertraline has the same mechanism of action as other SSRIs. It works by increasing the amount of serotonin that is available in the brain.

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter, or chemical messenger, that is involved in regulating many elements of a person’s daily life, including mood, sleep, rewards, learning, and memory.

Research has linked depression with low levels of serotonin.

Sertraline increases the amount of serotonin present in the brain, helping to reduce chemical imbalances and improve a person’s overall mood.

  • escitalopram (Lexapro)
  • citalopram (Celexa)
  • fluvoxamine (Luvox, Luvox CR)
  • fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax)
  • paroxetine (Paxil, Paxil CR, Pexeva)
  • vilazodone (Viibryd)

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) note that people use sertraline to treat depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders.

The main use of sertraline is to treat depression, though healthcare providers also prescribe this drug to help treat other conditions, including:

  • obsessive compulsive disorder, or OCD
  • panic disorder
  • social anxiety disorder
  • post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD
  • premenstrual dysphoric disorder — to reduce bloating, mood swings, irritability, and breast tenderness

A doctor may prescribe sertraline to treat other issues, such as sexual dysfunction or headaches. Anyone interested in the range of uses should consult a doctor.

Sertraline is available as either an oral tablet or a liquid.

Typically, a person takes a dose in the morning or evening, once a day. People using it to treat premenstrual dysphoric disorder may take it every day or only on select days of the month.

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, sertraline comes in the following doses:

  • 25 milligram (mg) tablets
  • 50 mg tablets
  • 100 mg tablets
  • 20 milligrams per liter of liquid

A person taking sertraline should follow these general guidelines:

  • Take it at about the same time every day.
  • Take with or without food.
  • Follow all instructions on the prescription packaging and from the doctor.
  • If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember to, but do not double the dose the next day.
  • Take only the amount that the healthcare provider has prescribed.

When using the liquid, dilute it in a drink. According to the National Library of Medicine, a person should mix 4 ounces (half a cup) of medication with one of the following beverages, then drink it immediately:

  • water
  • lemon soda
  • orange juice
  • lemonade
  • ginger ale

However, the right dosage will vary, based on a person’s age and weight.

Typically, a healthcare provider will prescribe a low dose and increase the amount over time, but no more than once per week. It can take several weeks before a person feels any effects of sertraline.

People should not stop taking the drug without speaking to a doctor, even if they are feeling better. This may mean that the drug is working, and missing a dose can result in a return of symptoms.

Side effects can vary from person to person. Talk to a healthcare provider if severe side effects occur or if any side effects do not go away.

Common side effects of sertraline include:

  • nausea
  • diarrhea
  • headache
  • dry mouth
  • sweating
  • nervousness
  • feeling restless
  • fatigue
  • trouble sleeping
  • sexual dysfunction

These side effects usually go away after the first week or two. However, sexual dysfunction often does not reduce over time.

Sertraline, which goes by the brand name Zoloft, is a common antidepressant. This article provides an overview of sertraline, including its uses, dosages, side effects, and interactions.

Drug Interactions between cannabis and Zoloft

This report displays the potential drug interactions for the following 2 drugs:

  • cannabis
  • Zoloft (sertraline)

Interactions between your drugs

sertraline

cannabis (Schedule I substance)

Applies to: Zoloft (sertraline) and cannabis

Using sertraline together with cannabis (Schedule I substance) may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Drug and food interactions

sertraline

Applies to: Zoloft (sertraline)

You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with sertraline. Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of sertraline such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

cannabis (Schedule I substance)

Applies to: cannabis

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of cannabis (Schedule I substance) such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with cannabis (Schedule I substance). Do not use more than the recommended dose of cannabis (Schedule I substance), and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

Therapeutic duplication warnings

No warnings were found for your selected drugs.

Therapeutic duplication warnings are only returned when drugs within the same group exceed the recommended therapeutic duplication maximum.

See Also

  • Cannabis Drug Interactions
  • Zoloft Drug Interactions
  • Zoloft General Consumer Information
  • Drug Interactions Checker
Drug Interaction Classification
These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences.

A Moderate Drug Interaction exists between cannabis and Zoloft. View detailed information regarding this drug interaction.