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    Using Alfalfa tea during flower

    Jorge: I am currently using a mixture of 5 gallons water to 1 cup alfalfa meal plus maxicrop and a little molasses. This brews for a week or longer and smells wonderfull.When I apply this I dilute the finished tea with water at 50% and I have been giving my outdoor plants 2 gallons of this mix once a week. Now they are all in flower mode and I wanted to know what your view was on the continued use of this tea and how far into flower would you continue to use it? There is no proven science that I have been able to locate on the net, just opinions that differ widely. I may just do an experiment for myself to see if it has any adverse effects.I had a soil analysis done and the rep told me that I didn’t need to add anything to the soil for a few years,everything was high in a good way and the PH was 6.8. All this is the result of adding manures and compost and mulch to my soil for 30 plus years.

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    Our entire feeding regimen is based on compost tea. It’s act/nutrient feed, rinse and repeat. It’s great that you have found success with alfalfa meal during vegg, I’ve heard that it’s a good supp for clones also. We in fact, hold off on the alfalfa until week 3-6 of flower along with yucca. We also add sawdust and cereal to promote a more bacteria/fungi balance for flowering.

    That of course is for the bacteria herd, our herd is derived from 1 part cow and horse manure, compost, humus and 3 parts worm castings.
    That’s the base, if it’s a vegg or bloom depends on the type and amount of guano also.
    So for us, we use alfalfa meal strictly for flowering but I will try in vegg like you.

    Last edited by hle144; 08-20-2014 at 07:02 PM .

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    Our entire feeding regimen is based on compost tea. It’s act/nutrient feed, rinse and repeat. It’s great that you have found success with alfalfa meal during vegg, I’ve heard that it’s a good supp for clones also. We in fact, hold off on the alfalfa until week 3-6 of flower along with yucca. We also add sawdust and cereal to promote a more bacteria/fungi balance for flowering.

    That of course is for the bacteria herd, our herd is derived from 1 part cow and horse manure, compost, humus and 3 parts worm castings.
    That’s the base, if it’s a vegg or bloom depends on the type and amount of guano also.
    So for us, we use alfalfa meal strictly for flowering but I will try in vegg like you.

    Thanks[/QUOTE
    This is my first time using the tea and the plants showed immediate results. Other posts have made varying opinions of what to do and not to do. Myself I added mycorrhizal bacteria to my grow for the first time also, It states that it will help the roots to absorb all the nutes that are available in the soil. So if this is true my soil analysis states that I have more than enough nutes in the ground already so there is no need to add anything! You using the tea during flower contradicts others but If it works for you and you like the results I would like to continue it’s use also. I would like to hear what Jorge’s view is thou. I know and have read about adding P during flower but as I stated above why do I need to if the Mico’s do what they claim they can do. I planted some with and some without and I really see no noticeable difference at the present time.

    Jorge: I am currently using a mixture of 5 gallons water to 1 cup alfalfa meal plus maxicrop and a little molasses. This brews for a week or longer and smells wonderfull.When I apply this I dilute the finished tea with water at 50% and I have been giving my outdoor plants 2 gallons of this mix once a week. Now they are all in flower mode and I wanted to know what your view was on the continued use of this tea and how far into flower would you continue to use it? There is no proven science

    Alfalfa Tea

    HtotheD
    Member

    I’ve recently started jumping out of the chemical line nutes and into brewing my own teas and organics. Recently meaning yesterday. I would love a little advice on my choices and maybe to have someone fill in the blanks.

    I’m using Just Right Xtra Potting Mix and growing indoors.

    I’ve decided to brew Alfalfa Tea (fermented) due to the amazing things I’ve read about it. It has a NPK ratio of about: [FONT=&quot]Nitrogen 3.75-5.5 % Potassium .75 – 3.5 % Phosphorus .3 – .7% . I’ve also made a worm casting tea which has lower N, high P and moderate K. This is brewed with wormcastings and molasses.

    I’m worried I have too much N when it’s time to switch over to flowering and was wondering what to switch to as a feed. I’ve been reading that normally the soil has what it needs but wanted to ask around.

    Mazar i Shariff
    Active Member

    That’s awesome bro! Props to making that bold move. I made the switch from chemical to 95% all organic, myself. I have seen a huge difference, from beautiful lush vegging plants with no burnt leaf tips, no purple stems, no defeciencies, all the way to more potent, better tasting buds that are reaching amazing potential. I use a lot of Advanced Nutrients products, and I noticed their main organic sources used are Fish Emulsions, Earthworm Castings, Volcanic Ashes, Alfalfa, Yucca, Fermented Composts, . Since you already have the earthworm (which is absolutely great) and alfalfa taken care of, I would look into all the various raw materials that I could compost such as egg shells, avacado peels, seafood bones & shells, and start composting them in a tumble bucket til they are broken down. From there you can create your mixture with that and leave it in a large barrel to ferment for a week or so, and then I would strain & filter it into another barrel before feeding to your plants. But talk about a rich, natural, & cheap source! I’m not sure how you could do volcanic ashes or others properly yourself, you’d have to do a lil more reading up on that. But I think you’re def heading in the right direction! Worst case scenario, you may have to buy a few organic compounds to add to what you’re brewing, but regardless you’ll save money and be much better off by staying away from those harsh & potent synthetics!

    My Nutrient Closet:
    -Adv Nutrients Organic Iguana Juice Grow
    -Adv Nutrients Organic Grandma Enggy’s Humic Acid
    -Adv Nutrients Organic Grandma Enggy’s Fulvic Acid
    -Adv Nutrients Organic B Complex
    -Adv Nutrients Organic Nirvana
    -Adv Nutrients Organic MotherEarth Super Bloom Tea
    -Adv Nutrients Organic Voodoo Juice
    -Adv Nutrients Organic Bud Candy
    -Adv Nutrients Organic Final Phase
    -Tropical Organics Banana Extract
    -Botanicare SWEET Organic Carbo (Berry, Grape, & Citrus flavors)
    -Botanicare Organic Cal-Mag
    -Botanicare Organic Silica Blast
    -Roots Organic OregonISM XL Beneficial Bacteria w/ Yucca, Kelp, Alfalfa, & H-2
    -Espoma Organic Garden Lime (Raises/Neutralizes PH to 7) & Organic Soil Acidifier (if PH ever gets too high which is rare with my water source)
    -Lots of EcoSmart Organic Insecticide
    -Just ordered some Adv Nutrients Kushie Kush, as well!

    carokann
    Active Member
    madodah
    Well-Known Member
    madodah
    Well-Known Member

    I’ve recently started jumping out of the chemical line nutes and into brewing my own teas and organics. Recently meaning yesterday. I would love a little advice on my choices and maybe to have someone fill in the blanks.

    I’m using Just Right Xtra Potting Mix and growing indoors.

    I’ve decided to brew Alfalfa Tea (fermented) due to the amazing things I’ve read about it. It has a NPK ratio of about: [FONT=&quot]Nitrogen 3.75-5.5 % Potassium .75 – 3.5 % Phosphorus .3 – .7% . I’ve also made a worm casting tea which has lower N, high P and moderate K. This is brewed with wormcastings and molasses.

    I’m worried I have too much N when it’s time to switch over to flowering and was wondering what to switch to as a feed. I’ve been reading that normally the soil has what it needs but wanted to ask around.

    First, congratulations on getting away from the chemical marketing game. Organic growing is like being pregnant; there’s no such thing as a little pregnant. Using salt based chemicals will ruin the living soil you’re creating with organics.

    I’m not familiar with your potting soil. Does it have a nutrient package or is it just plain potting soil? I ask because most organic grows, indoor and outdoor, have all the necessary nutrients in the grow medium. That’s the reason they don’t require nutrient supplements and also why many organic growers prefer mixing their own grow mediums. AACT (actively aerated compost teas) drench and foliar applications provide little to no nutritional supplements. Their primary function is supplementing microbe colonies on the leaves and stems and in the grow medium. Those microbes are the vehicles which, among other functions, provide decomposition of grow medium nutrients to service plant requirements.

    If you’re going organic you won’t have to be concerned with the possibility of too much nitrogen being present during the flowering cycle. The plant is always in charge and will take what it requires from your living soil. Just keep the microherd happy.

    Mazar i Shariff
    Active Member

    Oh i’m not offended. It’s a valid comment

    Are there lots of companies out there that will scam, or at the very least, mislead you as a means to buy their products? YES

    At times, are there cheaper products out there that can be similar quality, if not better, than that of the pricey competitors? YES

    However, when it comes to nutrients, it is no news that Advanced Nutrients is the #1 brand for developing cannabis specific nutrient lines. You may find a compost tea out there that is of excellent quality, but if the tea is composed of ingredients that give it a NPK ratio of say, 10-10-10, then it may be a quality product for SOME plant life, but NOT for cannabis. The reason, is that strains require different ratios than others as far as NPK, and I have never seen a single cannabis plant that grow well with equal amounts of NPK, for example. Therefore, you really have to pay attention to the ratios AS WELL as what they are derived from, or you might find yourself accidentally feeding too much of one or two nutrients during veg that are only required in that dose during flowering phase, or vice versa. So with that in mind, do some research on your specific strains and find out what they like. I have a white widow that will eat up nitrogen like nothing else, so I feed it what I normally do, plus it gets more Alaska Fish Emulsion @ 5-1-1 than the others. Then I have some that prefer lower doses and seem to like my Organic Iguana Juice @ 3-1-3 much more.

    In the end, one mans meat can be another’s poison. Def find what works for you and your strains personally and try to get into more depth from there. If you keep switching nutes every cycle trying to upgrade to the best of the best, you may find yourself lacking much needed consistency and success. As for me, I stick with it that Advanced Organics line is top notch and by far the frontrunner in cannabis related research vs all the other companies out there. Anyone who doesn’t believe that or wants to find out, the only solid way to truely find out is put two clones from the same mother side by side in your grow room. Feed one Advanced and the other a nute of your choice and find out for yourself!

    madodah
    Well-Known Member

    Oh i’m not offended. It’s a valid comment

    Are there lots of companies out there that will scam, or at the very least, mislead you as a means to buy their products? YES

    At times, are there cheaper products out there that can be similar quality, if not better, than that of the pricey competitors? YES

    It’s just, when it comes to nutrients, it is no news that Advanced Nutrients is the #1 brand for developing Cannabis specific nutrient lines. You may find a compost tea out there that is of excellent quality, but if the tea is composed of products that give it a ration of say, 10-10-10, then it may be a quality product for SOME plant life, but NOT for cannabis. The reason, is that strains require different ratios than others as far as NPK, and I have never seen a single cannabis plant that grow well with equal amounts of NPK. Therefore, you really have to pay attention to the ratios AS WELL as what they are derived from, or you might find yourself accidentally feeding too much of one or two nutrients during veg that are only required in that dose during flowering phase, or vice versa. So with that in mind, do some research on your specific strains and find out what they like. I have a white widow that will eat up nitrogen like nothing else, so I feed it what I normally do, only it gets more Alaska Fish Emulsion @ 5-1-1 than the others. Then I have some that prefer lower doses and seem to like my Organic Iguana Juice @ 3-1-3 much more.

    In the end, one mans meat can be another’s poison. Def find what works for you and your strains personally and try to get into more depth from there. If you keep switching nutes every cycle trying to upgrade to the best of the best, you may find yourself lacking much needed consistency and success. As for me, I stick with it that Advanced Organics line is top notch and by far the frontrunner in cannabis related research vs all the other companies out there. Anyone who doesn’t believe that or wants to find out, the only solid way to truely find out is put two clones from the same mother side by side in your grow room. Feed one Advanced and the other a nute of your choice and find out for yourself!

    No requirement for nutrient supplements is one of the pleasures of organic growing. Everything plants require are in a properly prepared living soil. AACT applications supplement microbe colonies which deliver nutrient requirements on plant demand. If one strain requires more nitrogen than another, a living soil meets that demand. There’s a reason grow mediums, their components and ACCT teas and their components are the serious topics on serious organic forums.

    For anyone seriously interested in organic growing and its many benefits, I recommend ‘Teaming with Microbes’. A small volume, written in layman terms, it describes what’s actually happening in a living soil.

    Hello: I've recently started jumping out of the chemical line nutes and into brewing my own teas and organics. Recently meaning yesterday. I would love a…