Categories
BLOG

bellflower seeds

The Germination of Bellflower Seeds

Related Articles

The members of the bellflower (Campanula) family range in size from tiny creeping plants to tall meadow annuals and perennials. The nodding white, pink, violet or blue bell-shaped flowers fill gardens across the Northern Hemisphere. Native to North America, Europe and the Mediterranean, bellflowers are hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture hardiness zones 3 through 9, depending on the variety. Most varieties are self-sowing, producing tiny seeds in hard capsules after the flowers fade.

Harvesting Seeds

As summer fades into fall, pollinated flowers develop seeds or seed capsules. Most members of the bellflower family develop small, hard capsules filled with tiny black or brown seeds. By snipping off the seed capsules and dropping them into a paper bag, you may scatter the seeds in other parts of the garden immediately or save them for spring planting.

Stratifying Seeds

To increase the germination rate of bellflowers, place the moistened seeds in labeled, open plastic or paper bags in the refrigerator from six to eight weeks. This period of cold mimics the winter season. The seeds are ready to germinate once you remove them from the refrigerator.

Germinating Seeds

After stratification, bellflower seeds require moisture and light to germinate. Scatter the tiny seeds over a tray of moist seed-starting mix and place it in a warm, brightly lit location. The seeds germinate in two to six weeks when planted in temperatures of 68 to 71 degrees F.

Planting Native Varieties

Native varieties of bellflower are often simply scattered over the garden bed and kept moist until the seeds germinate. Mix two parts fine sand to one part seeds in a salt shaker to help you scatter the tiny seeds evenly in the desired locations. Bellflower seeds may be scattered in the fall, immediately after harvest, or in the spring once temperatures rise to about 68 degrees F.

The Germination of Bellflower Seeds. The members of the bellflower (Campanula) family range in size from tiny creeping plants to tall meadow annuals and perennials. The nodding white, pink, violet or blue bell-shaped flowers fill gardens across the Northern Hemisphere. Native to North America, Europe and the …

Bellflower seeds

A member of the Campanula flower family, Bellflowers have beautiful bell-shaped blooms with flaring petals is very showy It really lights up a partly-shaded garden. Blooms usually begin in July, and last through to the first frost.

Bellflower plants are grown from seed. They can be directly seeded into your flower garden or started indoors for transplanting later. If planting outdoors, sow Bellflowers seeds after the soil has begun to warm in the spring.

Sow seeds early in the season and cover lightly with 1/8″ soil. Space seeds or seedlings 12-18″ apart.

How to Grow Bellflowers:

Bellflower plants are very easy to grow. They prefer full sun and a well drained soil. They will do well in average soils and tolerate dry soil conditions. Water plants during dry periods, once or twice per week. Add a general purpose fertilizer once or twice a season.

In rich soil, Bellflower will grow 24-30 inches tall. They fit well in the middle of your garden landscape or mixed in around rock gardens.

Once your Bellflower are established, they will grow well and bloom until frost. Being very hardy, they will likely survive the first light frosts before going dormant for the winter. They do not require mulching or protection in the winter.

Insect and Disease:

Bellflower are resistant to insects and disease. If insect or disease problems occur, treat early with organic or chemical insect repellents and fungicide.

How to grow Bellflowers, growing Bellflower plants from seeds.