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How Cannabis Affects The Pineal Gland

The pineal gland has a profound impact on the brain. Its sensitivity has led to speculation that it is the “third eye” referred to in mythology. It is worth investigating what sort of impact cannabis has on this part of the brain.

“The third eye” appears as an iconic symbol in Ancient Egyptian art. The Hindus also symbolised a third human eye with a ceremonial red dot or “bindi” on the forehead. This is said to mark the location of the Ajna chakra, a centre of energy for the subconscious mind. It is said to be humanity’s link to the spiritual realm, with philosopher René Descartes calling it “the seat of the soul”. Wasn’t much of Descartes’ medical research roundly discredited even during his lifetime? In short, yes. However, the long answer allows for the nuance that chakras do appear to correspond to important physiological locations throughout the body.

In the case of the third eye, the pineal gland not only appears there as an important neurological organ; it is in fact a light-sensing organ structurally similar to the eye. Okay, maybe there is something going on here. The pineal gland is important to many disparate cultures for its spiritual significance. It is named for its pinecone shape, a symbol that appears throughout the art of Assyrian, Greek, and other cultures. Claims about its powers range from attuning one’s mind with God or even telepathic communication. Let’s look at what the science has to say about the powers of the pineal gland. If it does serve some important function, then it is also worth exploring how cannabis can impact this part of the brain.

THE PINEAL GLAND

The first thing to look at is this whole “third eye” thing. Is it actually that similar to the eyes we see with? Or could it be some vestige of an eye that was previously there? Or has yet to fully evolve? Slow down. Let us consider how the name “pineal” relates to the gland’s pinealocytes. These are cells that respond to light. They are connected to the hypothalamus of the brain. This is where the governance of our circadian rhythm, or sleep-wake cycle, comes from. The hypothalamus communicates the presence of darkness to the pinealocytes, forming part of human perception of day and night. So it does form an important component of human perception. In other animals, it is even directly connected to the eye.

Many vertebrates across the mammal, reptile, and fish kingdoms have evolved a pineal gland. Others have evolved not to have one. In the case of the New Zealand reptile the tuatara, the pineal gland is directly connected to a literal third eye! Technically, the parietal eye is the correct gland to call a third eye. This gland appears on the tuatara’s head with a lens, retina, and cornea of its own. This connects to the pineal gland, as do the glowing third eyes of various deep-water fish. From an evolutionary standpoint, the pineal gland is clearly important to circadian rhythm, hormonal regulation, and things like that. But what else does it do for humans? And how would it be affected if said humans enjoyed some cannabis?

THE IMPACT OF CANNABIS ON THE PINEAL GLAND

The pineal gland receives blood flow directly from the rest of the body through the posterior cerebral artery. Since the blood is not processed through the blood-brain barrier, psychoactive chemicals hit the pineal gland much quicker. This makes it very sensitive to psychoactive chemicals such as DMT or cannabinoids. The pineal gland regulates healthy sleep through the production of melatonin. This is an important function to not mess up. Overconsumption of cannabis, as the definition of “excess” suggests, could have an adverse impact on this and other aspects of your health. It’s safer to moderate your cannabis use. If you are using cannabis, what can you expect to happen to the pineal gland?

The pineal gland is connected to the endocrine system and the endocannabinoid system. So as part of the network of cannabis’ influence, it helps the flow of cannabinoids to cannabinoid receptors. Perhaps your trippy dreams are the impact of cannabinoids regulating the depth and duration of your sleep. It has been suggested THC may reduce melatonin, which would adversely affect sleep. Yet so many people use cannabis to help get to sleep. Other effects of cannabis relieve worries and physical tensions that hamper sleep. The science around the relationship between cannabis and sleep requires further study.

SCIENCE AND SPIRITUALITY

Whether or not cannabis boosts some spiritually significant function of the pineal gland is down to perspective. An altered state of consciousness can be triggered by activity of the pineal gland during meditation. Meditative and psychedelic states are also known to arise through cannabis use. Cannabis has been used as a sacrament in far-flung religious ceremonies from Hinduism to Rastafari. There can be profound feelings of personal insight or connectedness with the world when taking cannabis. Does this sense of contentment come from the underestimated power of opening our third eye and stimulating the pineal gland? Or is this just the way one thinks when high? Stoners have a range of beliefs from the spiritual to the sceptical. Therefore, each person’s experience will vary. One thing we can all agree on is our fascination with the power of cannabis.

The pineal gland is said to be the third eye of mythology, but how does it interact with psychoactive cannabis?

How Does Cannabis Affect the Pineal Gland?

The pineal gland – the mythical seat of spirituality and consciousness, the site of the primordial “third eye” – has been of fascination to humanity since its function and importance were discovered. It is well-known that the pineal gland responds to psychoactive drugs, so what happens when we use cannabis?

While undoubtedly important, the pineal gland does not possess mystical or supernatural properties no matter how much some people would like to believe it does. Even some great, renowned thinkers have fallen into this way of thinking. One example being the scientist and philosopher Descartes, who described the pineal gland as “the seat of the soul”.

It is just one gland among many that comprise the endocrine system in vertebrate animal species. This system’s function is heavily involved in the regulation of circadian (daily) rhythm and the production of hormones – the most important being melatonin, the “sleep hormone”. However, there are a few things that make the pineal gland stand out as unique and interesting. Let’s take a brief look at what they are.

Why is the pineal gland so unusual?

The idea of the pineal gland being a primordial “third eye” has some basis in fact. The gland is made up of cells known as pinealocytes, which in some non-mammal vertebrate species directly respond to light. This ability makes them very similar to the cells of the retina, the part of the eye that receives light from the lens opening.

In some fossil species, scientists have even found holes just like eye sockets in the centre-rear part of the skull, which allowed the pineal gland to receive light directly, just like an eye. In fact, several modern species of reptile and fish still retain a functional “third eye”, such as the New Zealand reptile species the tuatara. The tuatara’s extra eye actually has a lens, a retina and a cornea of its own!

It is thought that these functional third eyes are involved in maintaining daily and seasonal cycles of hormone production.

In mammals, the pinealocytes aren’t known to directly receive light and there is no evidence of functional “third eyes” existing. However, the pinealocytes of mammals are known to be directly linked to the retina itself, which sends signals in response to changes in light levels in order to regulate circadian rhythms.

So in some respects, if one stretches the definition of what constitutes an eye, one could still say that the pineal gland functions somewhat like a rudimentary third eye even in mammals.

One interesting aspect of the pineal gland that certainly does apply to mammals, including humans, is this: unlike much of the brain, the pineal gland is not separated from the rest of the body by the blood-brain barrier. It receives abundant blood flow directly from the posterior cerebral artery, which may have something to do with its receptiveness to psychoactive substances.

Why do psychoactive substances often affect the pineal gland?

The pineal gland is in the perfect position to receive all kinds of substances not filtered by the blood-brain barrier. But it is also at the heart of a “cascade” of reactions which fire off when norepinephrine, a well-known neurotransmitter responsible for regulating the efficacy of many wake- and sleep-promoting medications, binds to its receptors in the pineal gland.

When norepinephrine binds to the receptors (known as adrenergic receptors), it results in a chain of hormonal and enzymatic interactions. These reactions are responsible for signalling when it is time to sleep and when it is time for the individual to wake and become active. Thus, this cascade is deeply involved in setting up one’s “mood” and how one perceives and responds to the challenges of the coming day. It also ensures that sleep of sufficient quality and duration is regularly achieved.

Clearly, the pineal gland is essential to maintaining a healthy, positive mind state, and is deeply involved with emotional states in general. When humans consume psychiatric drugs, it affects this complex cascade of activity in the pineal gland, in conjunction with various other parts of the brain. This gives a subjectively altered state of perception.

One example of the importance of the pineal gland in terms of psychiatric good-health is its relationship with the “Winter Blues” illness, seasonally affective disorder (often abbreviated to SAD). The fact that bright light is a common treatment for SAD suggests that the pineal gland and its associated light-sensitive hormone, melatonin, is involved. And the mere fact that low light levels can cause such a dramatic set of psychological symptoms indicate that the pineal gland may be fundamentally linked with psychiatric good health in general.

If that is the case, it is easy to assume its dysfunction may be behind other mental disorders too.

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How does cannabis work in the pineal gland?

Research on rats has shown that the pineal gland itself contains a functional endocannabinoid system. The cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2, and the endogenous ligands that bind to them, anandamide and 2-AG, are all present.

The study showed that the activity of the CB₁-receptors varied according to a daily cycle, with lowest activity levels occurring at the end of the daylight period. It also showed that levels of an enzyme responsible for synthesizing new endocannabinoid molecules, NAPE-PLD, was reduced during the middle of the dark period.

Furthermore, the study showed that presence of THC reduced the activity of an enzyme known as AANAT, and in doing so reduces the synthesis of melatonin itself.

An earlier study on rats also showed that THC reduced the activity of AANAT and suggested that the mechanism that occurred was as follows: the neurotransmitter norepinephrine starts a cascade of reactions, the end result of which is the production of melatonin. THC disrupts this norepinephrine cascade and thereby reduces the production of melatonin.

It then seems likely that THC’s endogenous analogue anandamide performs the same action of reducing the norepinephrine-induced release of melatonin and is therefore fundamentally involved in pineal gland function. It seems that low levels of anandamide or THC are therefore needed for melatonin production to increase. As melatonin levels increase, as they should normally do at the end of the daylight period, feelings of sleepiness should occur.

But smoking cannabis makes me sleepy! Why?

If low levels of anandamide are required for melatonin production to increase, and levels of cannabinoid receptor activity are lowest at the end of the daylight period, that seems to imply that using cannabis would cause melatonin to be reduced. If that is the case, sleepiness should also be reduced. But many people report feeling sleepy after using cannabis. Why is this?

It may simply be that the mechanisms relating to cannabinoids and pineal gland hormones work differently in rats than in humans. Indeed, while the studies on rats clearly showed that THC reduced melatonin levels, there is evidence to suggest that the reverse is true in humans.

A 1986 study showed that in eight out of nine healthy male volunteers, THC caused melatonin levels to dramatically increase, peaking around 120 minutes after administration. Interestingly, however, one subject showed a decline in melatonin in response to THC, just as was seen in rats.

Whether or not cannabis makes one feel sleepy may depend on dose, tolerance and a whole range of other factors. It may even depend on the time of day that the user consumes cannabis in relation to typical circadian rhythms. Furthermore, there may also be a genetic element controlling individual response to cannabinoids: Genetic differences in expression of cannabinoid receptors have been noted in multiple studies, especially in those related to memory behaviour and associated with happiness. You can find a couple of these studies here and here.

It is also now thought that many of the subjective effects of cannabis are not derived from THC per se, but rather from THC in combination with various other cannabinoids and terpenes. For example, myrcene is now thought to affect the “high” of pure THC, giving an overall more “couch-lock” effect to the user. In addition, CBD:THC ratios seem to matter and may contribute to differences in wakefulness and sedation.

But how does the pineal gland affect the process of getting high?

This is not entirely clear, and in any case, we know that multiple different regions of the brain are involved in the subjective experience of being high. The pineal gland is just one tiny link in an extremely long and complicated chain. This process stretches between some of the most basic and fundamental parts of the brain (and the pineal gland can definitely be classed as basic and fundamental, as almost every living vertebrate possesses one) and some of the most advanced, such as the neocortex, which only exists in mammals.

However, the pineal gland has repeatedly been associated with the biosynthesis of important natural compounds related to sleeping, dreaming and dream imagery. The presence of these compounds in the pineal gland is one of the most important reasons why so many view it as the “seat of the soul” or a key to “spiritual enlightenment”. Without a doubt, the most famous of these compounds is N,N-Dimethyltryptamine, more commonly known as DMT.

It’s somewhat controversial as to whether or not the pineal gland is responsible for synthesizing DMT in humans, but there is significant evidence to suggest that it is the case. DMT and related compounds like tryptamine have been found in human urine and DMT itself has been shown to be synthesized in the pineal gland of the rat brain. And a closely related compound, 5-MeO-DMT, has been found to be synthesized in the human pineal gland, but thus far, it has not been proven that DMT itself is too.

In any case, it certainly appears that the pineal gland is very much involved in the production and/or processing of substances that are well-known to be involved in helping to create “dream states” when we are asleep. So as you can see, there are many theories that the subjective experience of getting high from cannabis, hallucinogens and other psychoactive drugs also involves this subjective creation of a “dream-like” or otherwise altered reality.

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The pineal gland is part of a complex and fascinating system

While we are far from having a complete understanding of the complex network of chemical compounds that interact in the brain, we are beginning to build a simple map of how all these interrelated processes fit together. It is increasingly clear that the endocannabinoid system is a fundamentally important messaging system that helps to link together various parts of the brain, many of which work together to give us the subjective experience of being high.

The pineal gland itself is crucial to this process and has undeniable importance as a source of consciousness-altering compounds. It works with the endocannabinoid system and various other regulatory systems to control our subjective daily experience of mood, wakefulness and sleepiness. And when we introduce external psychoactive compounds, this process can be altered in fundamental ways, some of which can be greatly enjoyable!

The pineal gland is deeply involved with the action of psychoactive substances like cannabis. Let's examine how it affects your mood and your high.