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How to Make Cannabis Oil, Butter, and Edibles at Home

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Hey, pass the doobie… err, the gummy. You hear the latter more often these days, because the love of edibles is growing like a weed (see what we did there?).

In 2014 in Colorado alone (aka the capital of cannabis), 2.85 million units of edible cannabis-infused retail products were sold. Plus, nearly 30 percent of people who enjoy weed say they use it in edible or beverage form.

But hold up — can we interrupt this programming and say we aren’t encouraging you to eat edibles?

Fair warning: In recent years, cannabis-related visits to the ER have tripled in Colorado. Between 2014 and 2016, about 10 percent of emergency room visits were a result of ingesting cannabis.

Proper measurement of cannabis is crucial. And it’s better to take a less-is-more approach. Remember, it takes longer to feel the effects of edibles, and those effects last longer and can be more intense.

The first thing you need to learn is how to make cannabis-infused oil and butter. Soon you’ll be on your way to gummies, chocolate bars, and gluten-free crispy rice treats that’ll take you and your taste buds on a ride.

Have you ever made an herb butter? Cannabutter is no different. To make your own cannabis-infused butter, the only ingredients you need are:

  • 1 pound butter
  • 1 cup water
  • 1–2 ounces cannabis

Combine butter and water in a pot over low heat. Once butter melts, add ground cannabis to the mixture to simmer for 2–3 hours. Stir the mixture occasionally so it doesn’t come to a boil and so the THC is evenly distributed throughout.

Use and store like regular butter. If you’re new to making cannabutter, you can get more in-depth info at Marijuana Doctors.

Just like you can infuse cooking oils with herbs and other ingredients, you can infuse them with cannabis. Any oil — olive, coconut, whatever you have on hand — will do.

To make the oil more potent (so you feel the effects more), the weed has to be decarboxylated.

It’s way simpler than it sounds: Preheat the oven to a low temperature (about 225 degrees) and bake 1 cup of ground cannabis for 40 minutes.

To infuse the coconut oil, combine the following ingredients in a slow cooker:

  • 1 cup coconut oil (or oil of choice)
  • 1 teaspoon sunflower lecithin
  • 1 cup decarboxylated cannabis

Stir at least every 30 minutes to mix evenly. Simmer for 8–12 hours, and then let the oil cool in the slow cooker. Place a large piece of cheesecloth in a bowl or cup and carefully pour the oil mixture into the cheesecloth.

Secure with a string and use your hands to squeeze out the canna oil. Pour the oil into a mason jar or another container and let it cool in the fridge. Use the canna oil as needed.

Below are five recipes for weed edibles you can make at home. Just remember that edibles have a delayed onset (of up to 3 hours), unlike the instant high of inhaled smoke. So start small and be patient. Moderation is your friend.

Tip: Refer to The Cannabist to learn more about how much THC to add to your edibles.

Important note: Statistics show an increased number of calls to poison control centers due to children, adults, and family pets consuming cannabis edibles because they look like familiar treats and were not stored safely. Please label and store your creations with care.

1. Paleo berry cannabis gummies

You’re going to need a gummy bear mold for this recipe, and it’s worth it. Once you see how easy it is to form these little bears, you’ll reminisce about eating an entire bag of Haribo in one sitting.

But please don’t eat these with abandon. This isn’t just a sugar high.

These gummies have just five ingredients (two of which are water and lemon juice). You can also freeze your weed gummies so you’re ready for all the festivals (or just a night out with your besties).

2. Vegan cannabis chocolate bar

This is a chocolate bar you won’t be able to eat in one sitting — and not because of a lack of self-control. If you eat the whole thing… well, we don’t even really know what would happen. But just take our word for it: You’ll be way too high.

Pull out the typical ingredients you’d use to make this easy chocolate, but instead of regular coconut oil, use the cannabis kind.

3. Canna-bananas

We’re pretty sure this recipe was created for those of us who can’t even when it comes to spending time in the kitchen. Just melt chocolate and cannabis oil in a pot, coat the bananas, and freeze them.

Yep, that’s it. High-five for fast recipes that can get you… high.

4. Gluten-free cannabis crispy rice treats

Meet the new pot crispy treat. Made with nut butter, brown rice syrup, and cannabis butter or oil, these treats are going to snap, crackle, and pop their way into your mouth.

Just don’t make them for the charity bake sale.

5. Vegan weed brownies

Who’s ready to get chocolate wasted? Literally.

Made from sunflower seed butter, honey, flax, egg, cocoa powder, and cannabis, these brownies rival the ones you made in high school.

For a paleo version, use a regular egg and a nut butter of your choice. And here’s a recipe for a more standard pot brownie.

Now you’re on your way to making cannabis treats at home. And hey, tell your friends to watch who they’re calling a pothead: Some people believe weed has helped them get in the best shape of their lives, and yes, that includes athletes.

Last medically reviewed on January 15, 2018

Seven magical recipes for canna oil, butter, gummies, brownies, crispy rice treats, and more.

What Is the Difference Between Weed Oil and Cannabutter?

And where does CBD oil fit in?

With 4/20 around the corner and more legalized recreational marijuana than ever before, both heavy stoners and first-time tokers are asking the same question when it comes to weed in the kitchen: What is the difference between weed oil or cannabis oil and cannabutter (aka marijuana butter, cannabis butter, or weed butter)? While they do have a lot of similarities, confusing the two can have serious consequences—getting uncomfortably stoned, ruining a pan, or even wasting your weed. To truly understand their unique and similar qualities, we need to look at how they’re made, how they’re used, and where you can get them.

How They’re Made

While historians have found recipes involving weed dating back to 15th century Europe and even 10th century India, pot brownies were introduced to pop (or should we say “pot”?) culture in the 1968 movie “I Love You Alice B. Toklas.” Objectively, the most common way to make weed-laced snacks is marijuana butter, but baking with cannabis oil can be even more effective. While these two products have many similar uses and come from the same cannabis plant, they’re produced and used in very different ways.

Cannabutter/Marijuana Butter (and Cannabis-Infused Oil)

Beyond Pot Brownies The History and Evolution of Cannabis Cookbooks Part of weed culture since the 1960s, weed butter (or whichever other name you want to call it) can be made in a variety of ways. The process begins with some version of decarboxylation—or activating the THC. (Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is the psychoactive chemical compound of cannabis—what gets you stoned and what separates marijuana from hemp.) Decarboxylation can be done a multitude of ways, but typically involves cooking the weed at a low temperature for a prolonged period of time in butter or oil. Keep in mind, however, like any other dish you’re making, too much time in the oven or too much heat will torch the ingredients—rendering the THC ineffective.

While weed butter is best for baking in my experience, vegans and the health-conscious can rest easy knowing that using olive, vegetable, canola, or coconut oil for the process will produce a very similar product (which is cannabis-infused oil). One thing to consider in choosing your oil or butter is fat content—the higher the fat content, the more THC it’s capable of absorbing.

Finally, strain the weed from the oil or butter using a cheesecloth. The finished product is a potent and effective weed-infused ingredient, perfect for nearly any cooking application—minding any food preparation processes that could burn the THC.

Cannabis Oil

Ivan Stajkovic / EyeEm / Getty Images

Now that we’ve gone over cannabis-infused oils, let’s dive into their similarly monikered cousin: cannabis oil. Similar to olive, vegetable, or coconut oil, cannabis oil is made through a chemical extraction process. There are a variety of methods that the marijuana industry uses to extract oil, resulting in similar but unique products. Most cannabis extraction methods involve a solvent, like butane or CO2—or extreme heat and pressure—to extract the cannabinoids. These processes can be time-consuming and usually involve expensive laboratory equipment. Without proper training and the right tools, extracting THC from weed using certain methods is downright dangerous. Unless you’re using a solventless method, the excess yield—or product that isn’t cannabis oil—needs to be removed in order for a clean, non-toxic final result. For those of us who aren’t chemistry experts, most methods of this process should be left to the professionals.

CBD Oil

Another potential point of confusion: CBD oil, which is not the same as cannabis oil. CBD-only products, which have skyrocketed in mainstream popularity, do not contain any THC—meaning they won’t have any of the psychoactive effects of THC/marijuana, but are widely touted for the health benefits of CBD (or cannibidiol), such as treating chronic pain, and helping to reduce stress and anxiety.

Hemp Oil

And then there’s hemp oil, which contains neither THC nor CBD, but is widely used for all sorts of products from soap to supplements. For the purposes of this article, that’s all we’ll say about CBD oil and hemp oil—so back to cannabutter and cannabis oil.

How They Can Be Ingested

Marijuana Butter (and Cannabis-Infused Oil)

Marijuana butter and cannabis-infused oil can be ingested in a variety of ways. Once you’ve created the product, it can be used as a cooking ingredient for any recipe—minding that most baked goods work best with butter. However, one thing to consider is the temperature of the dish you’re preparing—heating the marijuana butter or oil to temperatures exceeding 245 degrees Fahrenheit will burn the THC. For a more simple application, the butter can be used as a spread on toast or even just dosed orally by itself. Some choose cannabis-infused oil as a medicinal ingredient in topical salves, lotions, and ointment, as it can be absorbed through the skin once it has gone through the decarboxylation process.

Cannabis Oil

Cannabis oil extracted via heat and pressure can be used in topicals or ingested by itself orally, but the taste and consistency leave a lot to be desired. The most common way to consume cannabis oil, also known as “concentrate” or “dab,” is by vaporizing or smoking it, but it can also act as an ingredient for an easier method of making weed butter. By simply melting the dab with some butter or oil at a low temperature, mixing them into one substance, you’ve made marijuana butter! Keep in mind, however, that cannabis oil needs to adhere to the same temperature cap of 245 degrees Fahrenheit to minimize the destruction of the THC. One downside to cooking with butter derived from cannabis oil versus marijuana is the stickiness of the product—certain types of oil can leave behind a difficult residue on cookware. (For those reading this tip too late, try rescuing your pan with 99 percent isopropyl alcohol! It’s super effective.)

However, making marijuana butter with concentrate is not the same as using traditional bud. Firstly, depending on how the oil is extracted, the THC can be already activated. This means you can skip the process of heating it up—it’s already ready to be used or ingested. Usually dispensaries can direct you to types of dab that have and haven’t undergone the THC activation process. Second, and perhaps more importantly, cannabis oil is an extremely concentrated (hence the nickname!) form of marijuana and can be much more effective than using regular Mary Jane. A good way to measure a comfortable dose is by simply doing the math. If a gram of cannabis oil is 70 percent THC (dispensaries usually disclose this information on the package), that means it contains 700mg of THC. With 48 teaspoons in one cup of butter, each teaspoon serving would boast 14.5mg of THC if you melted the cannabis oil gram with the butter. Most dispensaries have edibles in individual 10mg THC pieces, which is a great starting point for seeing what is comfortable. Another major difference is flavor: Some types of cannabis oil have intense flavors which carry over to whatever you’re cooking. Pick your concentrate carefully, as it can really affect the taste of the dish.

Differences in Accessibility

One major difference between marijuana butter and cannabis oil is their accessibility. In states where marijuana is legal, cannabis oil can be readily found at nearly any dispensary. In one-gram packages, cannabis oil comes in a plethora of consistencies, including shatter, wax, crumble, cake batter, sauce, diamonds, and more. While dispensaries in legal states aren’t hard to find, marijuana butter can be. While many shops carry a mass-produced industrial edible marijuana oil or butter product, other shops only carry smokable cannabis oil and traditional bud. It can be a niche product, and I’d suggest calling ahead to check availability. As someone with the privilege to access legal weed, I’ve still found the most consistent way to have marijuana butter is to make it myself. For those in less marijuana-friendly states, cannabis oil can be impossible to find and using the traditional method of making a personal batch of weed butter is their best bet for experiencing edibles this 4/20.

All in all, they’re not so different—but they’re definitely not the same. Cannabis oil can be used to make marijuana butter, but not all marijuana butter is made from cannabis oil. While nearly anyone with cooking experience can make marijuana-infused oil or butter, making cannabis oil should be left to the chemists, and while weed and cannabis oil are mostly readily available in legal states, pre-made marijuana butter can be hard to find—leaving both legal residents and those getting their bud on the black market in the same boat: making it at home.

Or Leave It to the Pros

How Cannabis-Infused Edibles Evolved Into High Art & Exacting Science

Disclaimer: This article is about cooking with cannabis, which may or may not be legal in your area. Neither Chowhound nor its parent company encourage or endorse any irresponsible behavior or illegal activity. If you choose to use cannabis , please do so responsibly and only where permitted by law.

Header image by Chowhound, using photos from Getty Images and Shutterstock.

What is the difference between THC weed oil and cannabutter? And how do you use them?