Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil

Hemp seed oil get you "high" but it does have plenty of benefits. Here is your hemp seed oil guide. Everything you need to know about the similarities and differences between hemp seed oil and CBD oil, including how they’re made, what they’re used for and potential benefits they provide. <p>Background: Cannabis sativa seed oil has become more and more popular in cosmetic industry mainly due to the high content of antioxidants and uns

Here’s Exactly What You Need to Know About Hemp Seed Oil Before You Try It

Trends come and go, but as we’ve seen with a few, there are some that just stick around, because their benefits speak for themselves. Case in point, the increased interest and discussion around hemp seed oil. While it may be known for its close relation to CBD products, it actually doesn’t contain any CBD, but does in fact contain many other health benefits. The oil is rich in healthy omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, as well as antioxidants vitamin E and beta carotene, making it a dynamic ingredient in skincare. With benefits that range from aiding in bone health to balancing hormones, hemp’s popularity proves that there’s something to this ancient seed. Read on for our complete guide.

What Is Hemp Seed Oil?

Extracted from the seeds of the hemp plant, hemp seed oil is cold-pressed from the seeds of the cannabis sativa plant—a tall, seedy, and fibrous plant native to Eastern Asia. While it’s used in beauty products as an emollient to retain moisture, it’s also used in various products such as paper, textiles, and biodegradable plastics. All food-grade hemp seeds can be further processed to make oil, or they’re shelled and are often added to smoothies or salads as a superfood.

Like flax seed and sacha inchi oil, hemp has a high amount of omega fatty acid content. Since these oils are heat- and light-sensitive, they’re not used for cooking, and rather kept refrigerated to preserve their nutrient content and essential fatty acid structure. Look for high-quality hemp oil that is unrefined, and dark in color—the green pigment in the oil is from the small amount of chlorophyll naturally present in the skins of the seeds.

The hemp plant, seeds, and oil were treasured for generations to treat inflammation, and became popular again in the past few decades. Dr. Andrew Weil published an article titled “Therapeutic Hemp Oil” in 1993, in which he looked at the benefits. “To most people, Cannabis sativa is synonymous with marijuana, but the plant’s Latin name means the ‘useful hemp.’ Species designated sativa (useful) are usually among the most important of all crops. In fact, the utility of hemp is manifold: the plant has provided human beings with fiber, edible seeds, an edible oil, and medicine, not just a notorious mind-altering drug,” the introduction states.

What Is the Difference Between Hemp Oil and Hemp Seed Oil?

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This may seem confusing but hemp oil differs from hemp seed oil. Hemp oil—aka CBD oil—is pressed from the leaves, flowers, stems, and stalks of the plant, which contains a higher concentration of CBD, and can be used to treat everything from epilepsy to anxiety. Hemp seed oil is pressed from the seeds of the plant, which don’t contain CBD, but they still have a rich profile of nutrients, fatty acids, and useful bioactive compounds that can also have health benefits.

So, Does Hemp Seed Oil Contain THC?

Often mistaken for cannabis, it does in fact belong to the same family, but they are two different plants and have different compositions. THC, tetrahydrocannabinol, is the psychoactive portion of the cannabis plant that makes you feel “high.” While the cannabis plant has high THC levels (up to 28%), the hemp plant’s THC concentration does not exceed 0.3%.

Hemp Seed Oil vs. CBD Oil: What’s The Difference?

Dr. Myles Spar is a double board-certified medical expert in performance medicine, men’s health, advanced testing and integrative medicine.

Commissions we earn from partner links on this page do not affect our opinions or evaluations. Our editorial content is based on thorough research and guidance from the Forbes Health Advisory Board.

Table of Contents

  • What Is Hemp Seed Oil?
  • What Is CBD Oil?

Hemp seed oil and cannabidiol (CBD) oil are sourced from the cannabis sativa plant species. Hemp seed oil is extracted from the seeds of the hemp plant, which is a variety of the cannabis sativa plant that contains less than 0.3% THC, while CBD oil comes from the leaves, stalks and flowers of both cannabis and hemp plants. Both oils can be identified across a variety of products, from beauty to food.

Read on to learn more about the similarities and differences between hemp seed oil and CBD oil, including how they’re made, what they’re used for and potential benefits they provide.

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What Is Hemp Seed Oil?

Hemp seed oil is extracted from the seeds of the hemp plant and offers a robust and nutty flavor. Consisting of around 70 to 90% of polyunsaturated fatty acids (often referred to as healthy fats), it’s abundant in omega-3 essential fatty acids, tocopherols and linoleic and linolenic acids.

Depending on the way hemp seeds are handled and processed, hemp seed oil may contain delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and CBD oil, according to a report by Oklahoma State University. Most companies producing hemp seed oil for consumption must adhere to strict guidelines, ensuring that the products contain almost imperceptible amounts of THC, 0.3% or less. This amount will not cause psychoactive effects.

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How Is It Made?

Hemp seed oil is extracted from the seeds of the hemp plant. The seeds are cold pressed, similar to the way olive oil is made. Once oil is extracted from the seed, it’s stored in a cool, dark place for processing and shipping.

How Is It Used?

Hemp seed oil can be used as a culinary oil to enhance flavor and may be drizzled on vegetables or made into salad dressings. It can also be taken straight from the spoon as a dietary supplement, as it’s found to be rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, according to the American Oil Chemists Society (AOCS).

Hemp seed oil also has a variety of industrial uses, such as paints, varnishes and other coating materials, due to its drying properties. The oil is also used in plastic flooring, such as linoleum.

Potential Benefits

Potential benefits of hemp seed oil include boosting omega intake, thanks to the oil’s unique composition of a 3-to-1 ratio of omega-6 (linoleic) to omega-3 (alpha-linolenic) essential fatty acids. In general, a diet rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids contributes to skin health, cardiovascular health, maintaining healthy blood pressure and reducing pain and inflammation, as well as potentially reducing some PMS symptoms like breast tenderness.

The dense nutritional profile of hemp seed oil also includes:

  • Antioxidants, such as vitamin E
  • Omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9
  • Carotene
  • Chlorophyll
  • Calcium
  • Sulfur
  • Magnesium
  • Potassium
  • Phosphorus
  • Zinc
  • Iron

Potential Risks and Side Effects

Hemp seed oil’s composition of fats can cause the oil to go rancid easily. A relatively low flash point—the temperature at which a liquid will vaporize or ignite when exposed to an open flame—also means it’s unsuitable for frying and is best consumed raw when fresh.

This oil is also difficult to store. Due to its fatty acid make-up, hemp seed oil is at risk of going rancid (oxidative deterioration), meaning it degrades when exposed to oxygen, according to the European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology.

For best use, hemp seed oil should be used at temperatures below 300 degrees Fahrenheit (150 degrees Celsius), and is best stored in the refrigerator or freezer after opening due to its short shelf life.

What Is CBD Oil?

CBD is one of the most abundant active constituents of the cannabis plant. It’s a non-psychoactive isomer of THC—meaning it won’t result in the intoxicating, “high” sensation. It’s derived from the leaves, stalks and flowers of hemp and cannabis plants, but as the legality of cannabis is still controversial in some places, most CBD oils are extracted from hemp plants.

“CBD is a plant compound found in cannabis sativa—both hemp and cannabis,” says Yvonne Perez Emerson, an herbalist and the founder of Make and Mary, a CBD boutique in Portland, Oregon. There are thought to be at least 100 unique compounds found in hemp known as cannabinoids, of which CBD is the second most abundant. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds that interact with the body’s central regulatory system (endocannabinoid system), which manages the body’s homeostasis (physiological balance) among bodily processes such as appetite, mood, memory, sleep, and immune system functions, adds Emerson.

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They can be either consumed as phytocannabinoids found intrinsically within CBD products or produced naturally by the body (endocannabinoids). When ingested, CBD oil can help the brain and body by interacting with the endocannabinoid system and neurotransmitters that impact inflammation, pain, mood regulation and stress response.

The Beneficial Effect of Cannabis sativa Seed Oil on the Epidermis

Background: Cannabis sativa seed oil has become more and more popular in cosmetic industry mainly due to the high content of antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids that are desirable in formulations because they prevent moisture loss and reduce the occurrence of dry skin.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Cannabis sativa seed oil on skin parameters such as hydration and transepidermal water loss.

Methods: The in vivo tests on volunteers with combination skin were performed by using corneometer and tewameter.

Results: The obtained results proved that Cannabis sativa seed oil improved skin condition. The transepidermal water loss decreased because the lipophilic components of the oil formulation tend to form an occlusive layer on the epidermis surface. The highest increase in skin hydration was observed after one week of treatment.

Conclusion: These results confirmed that Cannabis sativa seed oil has strong moisturizing properties and can be recommended as a natural-based skin conditioning agent.

Graphical Abstract
Current Cosmetic Science

Title:The Beneficial Effect of Cannabis sativa Seed Oil on the Epidermis

Volume: 1 Issue: 1

Author(s): Anna Olejnik, Aleksandra Galarda and Joanna Goscianska*

  • Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Uniwersytetu Poznańskiego 8, 61-614 Poznań, Poland

Abstract:

Background: Cannabis sativa seed oil has become more and more popular in cosmetic industry mainly due to the high content of antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids that are desirable in formulations because they prevent moisture loss and reduce the occurrence of dry skin.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Cannabis sativa seed oil on skin parameters such as hydration and transepidermal water loss.

Methods: The in vivo tests on volunteers with combination skin were performed by using corneometer and tewameter.

Results: The obtained results proved that Cannabis sativa seed oil improved skin condition. The transepidermal water loss decreased because the lipophilic components of the oil formulation tend to form an occlusive layer on the epidermis surface. The highest increase in skin hydration was observed after one week of treatment.

Conclusion: These results confirmed that Cannabis sativa seed oil has strong moisturizing properties and can be recommended as a natural-based skin conditioning agent.