Cannabis Seed Sprouted But Stopped Growing

Why Are Your Cannabis Seeds Not Germinating? Many first-time growers and inexperienced planters often experience this problem when trying to cultivate cannabis seed. They end up languishing and Common Seedling Problems & Mistakes Before we take a look at cannabis seedling problems and common beginner mistakes, let’s show you what healthy cannabis seedlings and young plants look like! If Did your cannabis plant just die for no apparent reason? Frustrating, isn’t it? There is a whole range of reasons why this might have happened and in

Why Are Your Cannabis Seeds Not Germinating?

Many first-time growers and inexperienced planters often experience this problem when trying to cultivate cannabis seed. They end up languishing and wondering why their effort is not yielding since a cannabis seed has a pretty high germination rate (99%). However, many things might not promote the germination process.

Generally, cannabis seeds are powerful and grow pretty fast. If the seeds do not germinate, there is likely a problem with the germination method. This article will explore many things that can go wrong when trying to cultivate cannabis seeds.

Genetics

The chances of having a viable seed increase significantly if the genetics is good. This is pretty important as it can avoid wasting energy and effort trying to germinate a bad seed. When you buy good quality seeds from trusted banks, you can breathe a sigh of relief, knowing that your actions will not be wasted.

As a result, it is not a good idea to grow seeds that you stumbled on inside a cannabis bag you got. Such seeds could be infertile and may not germinate. If it eventually germinates, you might not like cannabis. Make sure to buy the right seed from reputable stores and increase the chances of germination.

Direct Soil Germination

This is one of the top reasons your cannabis seed is not germinating. If you do not water the substrate before sowing the seeds and water afterward, there is a high probability that the seeds will not grow. This is not surprising as the seeds could be buried too deep, and adding water after sowing worsens this.

You can obtain good results by germinating the seeds in jiffy pellets, peat plugs, or using kitchen paper and later transplant them to a pot or the soil when the small seedlings come out. Make sure to care for your tender plant at this stage. Limit irrigation, support the right temperature and use Northern lights when growing indoors.

Wrong Temperature and Humidity

The ideal temperature for germinating cannabis seeds is high humidity and high-temperature levels. It is essential for people in tropical countries to provide external support of heat to get the temperature within reasonable and acceptable ranges. This is where heated greenhouses come in. Not only do they provide the right temperature, but they can get the humidity level to the ideal range essential for germinations. A cannabis seed needs 70% relative humidity and an average temperature of about 270C for germination.

If the temperature and relative humidity ranges are lower than the ideal value specified, the growth rate will be slow and unsuccessful. Excessive range, on the other hand, can lead to fungal problems.

Seeds Planted too Deep.

The amount of energy available to a germinating cannabis seed is limited. As a result, if planted too deep, it might not have the required energy to make its way up. A seed planted underground will have no light and is not producing food yet since no photosynthesis. Planting seed too deep creates extra stress for the seedling as migration to the surface becomes an issue.

As a result, you should plant your cannabis seed around 2 to 3 cm down or half inches deep. With this, they have enough room to grow taproots. This might be one of the reasons your cannabis seed didn’t grow.

Using Old or Unsterilized Pots and Soils

A fungus is one of the greatest enemies that might affect the germination of cannabis seed. If you reuse soil and it is not sterilized, there is a high chance of mold and other unhealthy organisms like insects and bacteria. As a result, the seeds may not sprout at all. Even if they grow, these organisms might kill them after a couple of days. For instance, a sprouting seedling might suddenly bend and change color to brown in a process known as damping off. This is common when you supply the seed with too much water when there is poor drainage or the aeration is poor.

Due to this, consider planting seedlings in a sterilized pot as the tendency of containing harmful organisms is low. Also, make sure the containers are clean as it can reduce the tendency of fungus.

Planting lots of Seed in one Pot

Planting a lot of seed in a single container might seem like a good idea due to the ability to save cost. This is like shooting yourself in the leg, as it might lead to a wasted effort. Even if the seeds germinate, they will compete for limited space, nutrients, and water. A cannabis plant needs enough space for its root to travel down without restriction to prevent severe intermodal distance.

Limited space translates to severe competition not only for nutrients but light as well. This is not a good idea if you want to get the best from your cannabis seed. If the seed eventually germinates, they will be weak, which will affect the plants and overall output.

Cannabis Seed left underwater for a long time.

Some growers prefer to soak their cannabis seeds before planting them. This is an essential step to break the dormancy and soften the shell to prepare the seed for planting. With a softshell, the taproot will easily break the body and push its way out of the shell. Typically, the seed will be put inside a glass of water and left until it sinks before the grower plants it. However, this is not as simple as it sounds.

A cannabis seed needs to be continually breathing, and a fully submerged seed will not get the necessary air supply. This might kill the seed if left for long inside the water. Once the seed sinks, take them inside the paper towel as soon as possible.

Conclusion

There are many intricacies involved in germinating a cannabis seed. Getting it wrong with any of the systems might not make the cannabis seed grow. You can arm yourself with these essential tips to ensure that your cannabis plants germinate. Use these tips as a guide when trying to germinate your cannabis seed. Also, if your seed does not germinate, this guide can help you troubleshoot.

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Common Seedling Problems & Mistakes

Before we take a look at cannabis seedling problems and common beginner mistakes, let’s show you what healthy cannabis seedlings and young plants look like! If your plants look like this, you’re golden!

Healthy Cannabis Seedlings Look Like This!

Examples of healthy cannabis seedlings:

Cannabis seedlings start with two round leaves known as “cotyledons.” These leaves are already formed inside the seed and simply open up once the seed has sprouted. After the cotyledons emerge, the “true” (serrated) cannabis leaves will start to grow from the center.

As they get older, the leaves start looking more like the cannabis leaf you are probably most familiar with. Here’s what those seedlings look like as they start growing into healthy young cannabis plants…

Now that you know what healthy young cannabis plants look like; let’s take a look at some common seedling problems to avoid so your plants grow as fast and healthy as possible!

Common Cannabis Seedling Problems

1.) Overwatering

Symptoms: seedling is droopy, growing medium is moist, damping off

Most common causes:

When a cannabis plant is “overwatered” it has less to do with the water and more to do with oxygen. Plants can even grow directly in water (hydroponics) but in order to thrive, roots need oxygen. In hydroponics, that’s accomplished by dissolving oxygen into the water. But when plants are grown in a container, too much water = not enough oxygen.

When a plant’s roots are sitting in water, they quickly use up all the oxygen until the growing medium starts to dry out. Without enough oxygen at the roots, the plant will start showing symptoms of oxygen deprivation. Luckily, there are many steps you can take to prevent overwatering your cannabis plants.

While overwatering can display many different symptoms, most overwatered cannabis plants look droopy, like this…

Despite what seems like an obvious cause, several different scenraios can end in overwatering. Here are some of the most common trouble-makers:

Big Pot, Small Seedling

When you have a small plant in a very big pot, it’s easy to overwater because the roots aren’t drinking much yet, and the big container takes a long time to dry out.

Notice how the plants in smaller containers have grown more than the plant that was put in a big container as a seedling. It’s common for plants in too-big containers to grow a little slowly at first.

  • (Recommended) Start seedlings in smaller container until they’re growing vigorously, then transfer to a larger container
  • If seedling is already in a big container, there’s still hope! When watering, give just a little water at a time in a small circle around the seedling. Then allow the top inch of your medium to mostly dry before watering again. Once the plant is growing vigorously, start watering as normal (with extra runoff water coming out the bottom every time)

These small cannabis plants (below) were put in big pots, and were given enough water to support a much larger plant. The plants couldn’t drink all the water that was given to them and as a result, their roots weren’t able to get the oxygen they needed and started “drowning.” Once the roots are out of commission, the leaves start drooping.

One way to prevent this from happening is to make sure your plants are in an appropriately sized container for each stage of their life; this is done with transplanting.

First, you need to get a general idea of the final container size which will be based on how big you want your plants to grow. The less often you transplant, the bigger the final size pot you’ll need because the roots will tend to grow out and cover the whole container if left too long. You can help avoid problems with roots getting rootbound by using a fabric pot (also known as a “Smart Pot”) or an air pot.

Final Container for Desired Plant Size – General guide
(the less often you transplant your plants, the bigger final size you’ll need)

12″ ~ 2-3 gallon container

24″ ~ 3-5 gallon container

36″ ~ 5-7 gallon container

48″ ~ 6-10 gallon container

60″ ~ 8-10+ gallon container

But what size pot should you use for your seedlings?

For fastest growth rates, it’s better to plant young seedlings or clones in a very small container, like a disposable plastic solo cup.

For new seedlings and clones, use a small container if possible

Easy transplant guide – some popular transplant guideline:

  • Solo cup -> 1 gal -> 3 gal
  • Solo cup -> 1 gal -> 5 gal
  • Solo cup -> 2 gal -> 5 gal
  • Solo cup -> 1.5 gal -> 3 gal -> 5+ gal

There is no perfect transplant guide, but the one above should give you a general idea of where to start.

Why don’t you want to go from a solo cup to a 5 gallon pot? Or why not just start in a 5 gallon pot?

Young plants won’t be growing very fast yet, so they also won’t be using much water. When you completely saturate a big container that slow speed means that the plant won’t be able to drink all the water. Since so much of the water is contained in the middle without access to air, it won’t be able to dry out by evaporation. This means you’re left with a huge container full of wet potting mix.

See also  Novelty Cannabis Seeds

The young cannabis plant roots will quickly use up all the available oxygen that’s been dissolved in the water, and then the roots will sit in water until the water slowly evaporates on its own. Some containers such as smart pots and air pots allow air in from the sides, which can help dry the growing medium faster, but it’s better to use proper technique from the beginning.

Planting in too big a container is sometimes called “overpotting.” It’s possible to get around this with special watering techniques (for example by giving plants just a little bit of water until they start “growing into” their containers) but starting plants in small containers and transplanting as needed can be a more straightforward way for some growers. Overpotting plants is also a waste of growing medium and nutrients, especially if the plants never get big enough to fully use their containers.

This OG Tahoe Kush seedling was overpotted, though this can be overcome by the grower just giving a little bit of water at a time until the plant starts growing vigorously. At that point, the grower can provide more and more water until they’re finally watering normally.

More information about container size and transplanting here: https://www.growweedeasy.com/germinate#what-size-pot

Small Pot, Big Seedling

While using a too-large container can cause problems for seedlings, so can too-small of a container.

Seedlings are happy in a small container like a solo cup for a while, but as they get bigger, their roots need more room. The roots tend to wrap around the outsides of the container, encasing the middle part so that water can’t get out. This is known as the plant being “root bound.”

If the seedling isn’t transferred to a bigger container in time, it can cause symptoms of overwatering, nutrient deficiencies, wilting, and sometimes very strange and unpredictable symptoms.

These plants were left in a too-small container for too long. Because they were drinking so fast, the grower watered them frequently – too frequently! This combination of being root bound and overwatering caused the plants to suffer.

A too small container, combined with overwatering – these conditions can cause some strange symptoms that often look like a nutrient deficiency

Pink leaves, red discoloration, rusty spots and edges… While it make look like these cannabis seedlings are experiencing nutrient deficiencies, all these symptoms are actually caused by a combination of overwatering plus a too-small pot.

When the roots aren’t happy, the plant isn’t able to uptake nutrients properly and cannabis seedlings can show a wide variety of strange problems.

It’s usually not a good sign when cannabis leaves start “crossing their fingers” like this (instead of having all the leaf tips spread out). While this can happen naturally every once in a while, you know for sure that you’re having a problem if the crossed fingers are combined with discoloration of the leaves. Also notice how the stems are bright red/pink.

The following cannabis plant was also overwatered and had no drainage. Notice how dark the soil is and the green algae growing all along the top of the soil – these are more signs the plant has been overwatered for quite a while. You should never water your plant when the soil on top is still wet, and if you notice lots of algae growing on top of your soil, it may be a sign that you’re overwatering on a regular basis. Leaving the top of the soil wet is also the number one reason growers get fungus gnats.

No Drainage (or poor drainage)

Cannabis roots need oxygen to thrive, and therefore they will have trouble if the roots are “drowned.” If water cannot run out the bottom of the container, it will pool at the roots, which causes overwatered plants.

  • Always start with a good growing medium that drains well – never use a clay based soil which holds onto way too much water. A high quality potting mix (especially mixed with some perlite) provides great drainage
  • Start with a smaller container to reduce the chances of overwatering seedlings
  • Make sure there are plenty of drainage holes to let water out the bottom of the container
  • If water runs through growing medium slowly, you can mix perlite into the potting mix to increase oxygen and quicken drainage
  • Water less often and less at a time until plant is drinking more
  • Get a container that helps the growing medium dry out from the sides (such as “Smart Pots” – highly recommended; or air pots).
  • Don’t allow plants to sit in a tray that has been collecting runoff water

This seedling started “damping off” (dying) due to terrible drainage from bad soil. Never use soil that looks like it contains clay!

Seedling is “damping off” due to bad soil with no drainage

Here’s another example of a seedling damping off due to too much water (drowning roots), whis time combined with not enough light. After a few days of these conditions, this seedling just fell over and started dying.

The following plant was grown in an unsuitable growing medium with no drainage and started showing signs of overwatering. Always start with a quality potting mix that has good drainage, and never allow the top of your growing medium to look this wet!

This “soil” is more like mud. The plant roots are drowning from lack of oxygen, causing severe wilting.

Watering too often

While oxygen is available to the roots immediately after watering, the roots use up all the oxygen quickly if they are sitting in water. If all the oxygen is gone, roots are not able to get what they need to help power growth, at least not until the growing medium begins to dry out and create new air spaces in the growing medium.

Keep roots happy for fast-growing plants

Each air spot in the potting mix provides roots with precious oxygen, but if there’s no air spots, roots start to “drown.” By watering seedlings less often, growers can ensure that roots are getting access to plenty of oxygen at all times.

Of course you should never allow roots to actually dry out – roots need moisture at all times. But for new growers who want to do everything possible for their new seedlings, it can seem like more water = better. Unfortunately, this isn’t true.

Roots work best when they get as much oxygen as possible while also staying completely moist at all times.

  • Wait until top inch is dry. Make sure that the top bit of potting mix has started to dry before you water seedlings again. Sometimes it can take a few days, depending on your growing medium, your environment and how much water you provided during the last watering.
  • Increase the number of air pockets in the growing medium by mixing in a “lighter” amendment like perlite to the potting mix. Perlite will allow the mix to hold onto more oxygen when mixed with heavy soil. Many cannabis soil growers will mix 30-40% perlite into their potting mix to make sure there’s lots of drainage and plenty of air available for the roots.
  • Provide air from the sides. Transplant to a container which allows air in from the sides like fabric pots (“Smart Pots” – highly recommended) or air pots. until plant gets bigger so there’s less water in the potting mix that needs to dry. You’ll be able to water your plants more often while ensuring they get plenty of oxygen.
  • Water less when it’s cold. Plant processes tend to slow down when temps get cooler. This means that plants usually need water less often than normal after a cold snap.

This plant went through a few cool days but the grower continued to water as normal. As a result, the plants roots were surrounded by too much water and the plant started showing signs of overwatering.

The plant was watered the right amount each time, but too often. As a result, it shows some slight drooping. While this won’t kill the plant, the plant will definitely grow faster when the mix is allowed to dry out a bit so the roots are getting plenty of oxygen.

2.) Underwatering – seedling is droopy, wilting, or not growing properly, and the growing medium around the seedling isn’t moist

While overwatering is the most common seedling symptom, underwatering is also a problem, especially for those who have been warned to avoid giving too much water.

It can be confusing because the symptoms often look similar to each other, which is why it’s important to learn good watering practices.

This seedling was underwatered – the grower had been warned many times to avoid overwatering, and went too far in the other direction. Notice that the growing medium looks bone dry.

It’s crucially important to make sure that plant roots have access to moisture at all times. Plants are constantly losing water through their leaves (called “transpiration”) and this is actually how plants get water up from the roots. As the plants lose water from the leaves, it pulls water up from the ground like a straw.

When there’s not enough water at the roots, many plant processes cease to function. If roots actually dry out, the dried shoots die.

Here’s another example of a young cannabis plant that is underwatered, even in a big container (where the problem is usually overwatering). Notice how this cannabis seedling is basically just wilting and falling over, while the potting mix looks completely dry.

Seedlings suffer greatly from being underwatered, even more so than from overwatering. Often the grower will actually be able to see how dry the growing medium is. A big sign that the plant is being under-watered is when you can see the soil separating from the container. In this case, you can see the starter cube separating from the soil because it’s so dry.

Underwatering is bad on it’s own, but it causes the most problems when young cannabis seedlings are also stressed by too high levels of nutrients, or when started in a “hot” (nutrient-enriched) soil.

When underwatering is combined with too much nutrients, seedlings often become dark green and stunted, with twisted and discolored new growth.

The solution for this (underwatering + high levels of nutrients) is simply to give the plants more water so they can establish roots and start growing again. Most plants will be able to grow out of this problem once they get enough water to start growing. While it’s not always the best idea to start out with a hot soil mix, most seedlings will easily grow into it if given a good growing environment.

This cannabis seedling is dark because it was underwatered in a “hot” soil mix, but after watering the plant as normal for a week or two, the plant started growing vigorously

3.) Nutrient Problems – leaves are yellow, discolored, crispy or have spots

Healthy cannabis leaves on seedlings should be green! Again, here’s what healthy leaves look like.. .

Healthy Leaves Look Like This

When the cannabis leaves of young plants stop being green, you need to react. Changes of color (such as yellowing, spots, burnt tips, etc) are usually a sign that there’s a problem when it comes to young cannabis plants.

The leaves of young cannabis plants & seedlings should be green!

Some common seedling nutrient problems include…

Too Much Nutrients

A nutrient toxicity is most common in dry or hot conditions, when starting in “hot” soil, and when plants are underwatered.

Two of the most common signs of nutrient toxicty are tip burn and dark leaves.

Tip burn is a sure sign that the plant took up too much nutrients

A closeup of nutrient tip burn

Nutrient burned tips eventually start curling upwards if nutrient levels are too high for too long

Very dark leaves often indicate a nitrogen toxicity (too much nitrogen)

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If a nitrogen toxicity is left too long, it starts causing other nutrient problems, like the yellow lines on the bottom leaves of this plant.

Causes of Nutrient Toxicity

  • “Hot” Potting Mix – Sometimes seedlings get a nutrient toxicity when started ing a “hot” potting mix (one that has a lot of nutrients). If it’s good soil and you’re watering properly, your seedlings will be able to grow out of this relatively quickly.
  • Slow-Release Soil – Nutrient toxicities are common when grower start with a “extended release” soil like Miracle-Gro original soil – you don’t want any type of soil that will be slowly releasing nitrogen throughout the grow; it will cause nutrient burn and reduced bud development in the flowering stage. Avoid original Miracle-Gro soil and any other slow-release soils!
  • Give Nutrients Too Soon – Giving nutrients too early will overload the seedling with nutrients – in a good soil potting mix, additional nutrients usually aren’t needed for the first few weeks at least
  • Give Too Much Nutrients At Once – Giving too much nutrients at once can cause a toxicity overnight – always start at half the recommended dose according to the nutrient schedule (most cannabis nutrients come with a nutrient schedule), and see how your plants react before upping the dose

Too much nutrients too soon caused this (tip burn)

While the above seedling may look light colored, the problem is actually that it was given too high levels of nutrients.

When there’s too many nutrients, the plant can start getting light colored because some nutrients are getting locked out. The tip burn on the leaves is a good indicator that this problem is caused by too many nutrients. Also this grower started with a “hot” (nutrient rich) soil mix, and there’s no way a plant this size could have already used up all those nutrients.

A lot of growers may think the way to fix this is add more nutrients since the plant leaves are pale, but that will actually make things worse! This plant just needs some plain water until it starts to use up the nutrients in the soil, and it will soon take on a healthy green appearance on new leaves.

Not Enough or Wrong Kind of Nutrients

Nutrient deficiencies and other nutrient problems are most common when growers are using the wrong type of potting mix or cannabis nutrients.

Two of the most common signs of nutrient deficiencies are pale or yellowing leaves and other unusual leaf discoloration.

The most common type of deficiency is a nitrogen deficiency.

The yellow leaves of a nitrogen deficiency may show signs of brown, and they will usually become soft and sort of “fold” in, before turning crispy and falling off on their own.

If the yellowing leaves are at the top of your plant or the yellow leaves are mosty new growth, then you probably don’t have a nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen deficiencies affect the oldest, lowest leaves first.

Nitrogen Deficiency Leaf Closeup

There are many other nutrient deficiencies, and you can view them all here…

Causes of Nutrient Deficiencies and Problems

  • Soilless Medium w/o Hydro Nutrients – Some growers may start in a soilless medium and not realize it has no nutrients (with a soilless medium like vermiculite, coco coir, pertlie, rockwool, etc, it’s up to the grower to provide all the nutrients since they are inert mediums and don’t contain any nutrients on their own) which results in a deficiency if grower isn’t providing extra nutrients. Soilless mediums are easy to grow in, but they do require the grower provide nutrients from the beginning.
  • Don’t Provide Nutrients As Plant Uses Up Soil – Many growers start in a good soil that has nutrients, but don’t give nutrients or transplant seedlings to a bigger container when the plant has started to use up the nutrients in the soil
  • Wrong Type of Nutrients – Nutrient deficiencies commonly show up with the grower gives their plants the the wrong type of nutrients – generally it’s a good idea to give a “vegetative” nutrient formula for the first part of the plant’s life and a “bloom” nutrient formula for the flowering/budding stage. When giving the wrong time of nutrients at the wrong time, your plant won’t grow as well. If you give vegetative nutrients in the flowering stage, you make it harder for the plant to form buds, while also increasing the chance of getting nutrient burn and other nutrient problems.

Other Nutrient Problems

  • Not Maintaining pH – If growers don’t manage pH, their plants may show signs of nutrient deficiencies even if the nutrients are actually there near the roots.
  • Improper Watering Technique – Growers who don’t water properly (growing mediums stays wet or dry for too long, poor drainage, etc) often start getting nutrient deficiencies as the plant isn’t able to effectively carry out normal plant processes
  • Too Small Container – Nutrient problems crop up when plants are kept in a small container for too long without being transferred to a bigger pot (this is known as being “root bound” and can cause the plant to display nutrient deficiencies because the roots aren’t functioning properly)
  • Bugs– a lot of bugs and pests may initially look like a deficiency (spots on the leaves can appear from bites, or if bugs have infested the soil, etc)

4.) Heat – leaves bend in the middle so they look like canoes or tacos, turning up at the edges, wilting, strange spotting, symptoms usually appear after temperature starts climbing.

When the heat gets too high, the edges of the leaves will begin to curl up and the leaves will begin to “cup” or “taco.”

Here’s another cannabis seedling suffering from heat stress – notice how the edges are curling upwards. The solution to this problem is simply to lower the heat as experienced by the plant.

Sometimes the leaves sort of fold downwards due to heat, too, like this seedling

After being subjected to overwatering plus a heat wave, the leaves of the following seedling started cuppping upwards and turned lime green. The stems and veins of the leaves were turning red. You can see the soil is still dark and wet because the plant stopped drinking after developing root problems.

Cannabis plants often display heat stress when grown in hot, dry weather, especially when not given the right amount of water.

Learn more about cannabis heat stress and how to fix it: https://www.growweedeasy.com/heat-light-stress

5.) Not enough (or too much) light – burned or crinkled leaves, too much space between nodes, tall seedlings that fall over

Not Enough Light = Stretched, “Leggy,” Tall Seedlings

Too Much Light = Burned, Crinkled Leaves

Stretched, “Leggy,” Tall Seedlings – Give More Light!

This seedling is stretching too tall, with a lot of space in between sets of leaves, and a long thin stalk. This is caused by the plant not getting enough light. It’s “reaching” upwards, trying to find the sun.

More seedlings stretching from lack of light

To fix too-tall seedlings, simply provide more light (usually by bringing grow lights closer or getting a brighter grow light)

After giving enough light, growers can bury the extra stem, or just wait until the seedling grows out of it on its own

Burned, Crinkled Leaves – Reduce Light or Move Grow Lights Up

This cannabis seedling basically grew up into the grow light!

This cannabis seedling is being burned by too-close LED grow lights

FAQs – Frequently Asked Questions

Question: What do seedlings like?

Answer: Moist but not drowning conditions, warmer temps, and a bit of light to help them start growing. Very little nutrients to start.

Question: How do I avoid germination problems?

Answer: Before anyone worries about cannabis seedling problems, it’s important to get your cannabis seeds to sprout!

So make sure you are avoiding these common germination mistakes!

Most importantly, just remember that cannabis seeds like a warm, moist environment to sprout.

Common Germination problems

  • Too wet – don’t drown your seeds! While it’s okay to soak seeds for the first 24 hours, after that they should be moist but not soaking.
  • Too dry – if seeds are too dry, they won’t sprout! If seeds sprout but then are exposed to dryness, they will die.
  • Too deep – if you plant seeds too deep in the growing medium, they may have a hard time making it to the surface. An inch deep (just enough to support the seed and cover it) is about as deep as you’ll ever need to go.
  • Not warm enough – seeds and seedlings like warmer temps (from 80-85 F) and will grow more slowly in cooler environments.
  • Wrong starting growing medium – Many growers like to plant their seeds directly in a growing medium, just like in nature. But some growing mediums are better for seeds than others. Learn more about the pros and cons of different starting growing mediums here.
  • Old or improperly stored seeds – any seeds that germinates is a good seeds, but older or improperly stored seeds often take longer to sprout, and may no sprout at all, even if you do everything right.
  • Not ripe seeds (pale or translucent) – while any seed that sprouts is a good seed, seeds that are pale, flimsy or translucent have very low germination rates because they’re not fully mature.
  • Too much humidity – Some growers like to use a humidity dome for new seedlings, but don’t leaves these on too long after sprouting, as too much humidity can cause “damping off (seedling sort of folding over and dying, more info below)

Question: Am I drowning my plants? I planted my seeds two days ago in moist soil, I watered them a little, but no waterlogging. I then stopped watering them for fear of drowning them. Today, the top of the soil is getting dry, there’s still some moisture left in it, but not much from what I can tell. Should I keep it moist or just leave it be?

Answer: Young seedlings can get easily drowned, especially in a big container (learn about different containers for growing cannabis). But at the same time, they like moist conditions, and seedling roots should NEVER dry out as this can kill or seriously stunt your plant.

But how to balance the need for both water and air?

In a smaller container like a solo cup, it’s very difficult to overwater young seedlings as long as there’s plenty of drainage and you’re using a good growing medium. Once seedlings have started to outgrow a small container, you can transfer to a bigger container and the seedling will be much more robust.

If you’ve started your seedling in a big container, it’s good to be worried about overwatering young seedlings. In a large container, it generally takes a relatively long time for the growing medium to dry out, and your seedlings aren’t drinking much. Therefore it’s easy for them to get waterlogged. In this situation, you can use a spray bottle or a mister to mist the area around the plant thoroughly, which will seep down to the roots and keep them wet, but won’t soak the soil. Another option is to use just a small amount of water, maybe a cup at a time, and water in a circle around your plant until it starts growing vigorously. Giving seedlings just a bit of water at a time prevents them from getting drowned in drenched soil.

Once the plant is growing fast, you can start watering as normal (water until 20% runoff comes out the bottom, then don’t water again until the top inch is dry to the touch). At this point your plant will be drinking more and will have a stronger root system to seek out both the water and the oxygen it needs.

After reading this article, all your seedlings will look as green and happy as this one!

How to prevent the death of cannabis seeds and seedlings

Every grower, almost without exception, will have occasionally suffered the death of a plant during cultivation, just when it seemed that everything was going along nicely. In this article, we’ll focus on the main reasons why seeds may not germinate properly, or why seedlings may end up dead in the first weeks of life.

Seeds dying before germination

Cannabis seeds can die even before we start to grow them, in which case, when the grower comes to germinate them, they won’t open up and sprout at all.

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The seeds of the cannabis plant, like many other types of seeds, must always be kept in the correct conditions, especially if you want to save the leftover seeds for later use and ensure that they germinate well in the future.

The same goes for unopened whole packs of seeds that have been purchased to store for later use. Sometimes, certain varieties are in high demand and there is limited stock, so the more astute growers will make sure they grab a few packs to keep in the vault until they find the time to germinate the cannabis seeds.

Cannabis seeds must be stored in the correct conditions

What to do with leftover seeds or unopened seed packs

Cannabis seeds need very low relative humidity and relatively low temperature for their proper storage, so the best plan is to keep them in a “no frost” refrigerator, in which both the humidity and temperature are maintained at very low levels for better conservation of food.

If we want to keep a seed package that’s still sealed, simply put the whole unopened pack into the fridge. The best place for its conservation is usually the small shelf where the eggs or butter are kept, although really any part of the fridge is ideal for storage.

If we want to save the leftover seeds from a pack for later use, we recommend storing them in the original Eppendorf tube or container used by the bank. In the original packaging, these Eppendorf tubes hold the seeds and usually also contain a few small silica gel balls, included to maintain very low humidity (10 to 20%) and help to ensure that the seed does not lose any germination viability.

If, however, we leave the seeds for a long period of time in any corner of the house it is possible that over time their viability to germinate will decrease, and when we plant them they may take a long time to germinate or indeed not germinate at all. it is also important to protect them from sunlight.

So if you wish to save the seeds in the best conditions, always keep them in the refrigerator, well protected from air, light and moisture.

How do we store leftover seeds to grow at a later date?

Death during the germination of cannabis seeds

Death during the germination of cannabis seeds is one of the most frequent failures suffered by every grower over the course of his or her cultivation career. There are several possible reasons that can lead to the seeds dying before they even open and begin to grow, which we’ll examine here.

Not all seeds have the same resistance to the errors that may occur during the germination process. Just as not all siblings are not all equal, neither are all seeds. By this, we mean that in the case of one seed germinating and the rest of them not doing so, it doesn’t necessarily mean that those that didn’t germinate were not strong or resistant, but simply that they were less so than the one that did germinate. If this occurs, we must ask ourselves why they did not germinate and look for any possible failings in the process.

Death by drowning the seed during germination

We start from the basic premise that the seeds require moisture, oxygen and a suitable temperature for germination; If one of the three aspects is not taken into account, it is quite likely that the seeds won’t end up germinating.

Putting the cannabis seeds in a glass of water and waiting 24 to 48 hours for their germination can be a fatal error for them. Re-hydrating the seeds in water is a good idea as long as they are not out of contact with the air for long, as they will be deprived of oxygen and most of the time they will end up dying; so if we use this method, we only leave them to re-to hydrate in water for a few minutes, although, preferably we will avoid any previous soaking or re-hydration (which in any case is not necessary).

We must maintain suitable levels of humidity for germination

The reason for this is that tap water contains chlorine, which sterilises the water to make it suitable for domestic use. However, this chlorine disappears by evaporation after a few hours, so if the water then gets contaminated, the seed can be attacked by any number of pathogens and eventually die. This example also illustrates why we must always touch the seeds with clean hands; If the seeds are handled with dirty fingers, it can lead a fungal or bacterial infection to contaminate them and severely compromise their development.

The same can happen in other germination media such as jiffy plugs, where the most common mistake is usually not draining away the excess water after re-hydrating the compressed peat. To this error, we can add that of burying the seed at more than twice its own depth, in which case it may not emerge despite having germinated perfectly well, but instead, simply end up rotting due to excess water and lack of oxygen. This error is also frequent in growers who germinate directly in the soil because when they first irrigate, the seed can be washed down into the soil resulting in them being buried too deeply, which makes it difficult for the seedling to reach the surface. It is always better to wet the substrate first, before sowing any seeds.

If you want to sow the seed directly into the soil and do it properly, when growing outdoors you must also act to prevent seed predators. Ants, birds, and many other animals or insects are another common cause of seed failure during germination. In the case of ants, they eat the small, delicate root, leaving the plant unable to develop and condemning it to imminent death.

Placing the seeds between moist serviettes/paper towels is one of the best germination methods for beginner growers. Since you can easily see if the seed has taken root or not. But we must also bear in mind that the germination medium, the kitchen paper, is made of cellulose, meaning it is an organic material that will decompose and rot, just like any product of this type.

Planting the germinated seed is also a crucial moment

It is, therefore, obligatory to change the napkins every day and a half, more or less, to avoid the seeds being contaminated by the pathogens that can appear as the napkins begin to rot. For this reason, we recommend placing the napkins in a deep plate and covering it with another one, leaving a small gap between the two so that air can enter, oxygenate the microclimate that is created during the germination of the seeds and avoiding them rotting.

Seeds dying due to lack of moisture

Just as excess water is one of the most common causes of germination problems, the lack of moisture is equally detrimental to the process.

If outdoor temperatures are around 20 to 24ºC, then we shouldn’t need do much more than start the seeds to germinate and wait for them to open, following the precautions already discussed. But in case of having warmer or cooler temperatures, we must act to raise or lower the environmental temperature for optimal germination, and find the best location for germination to be successful.

If it is winter, the plates holding the seeds are often placed on top of a low heat source to raise the temperature. We must, however, be careful: if this heat source emits hot air, the paper towels will dry out and the seeds will run out of moisture, affecting germination. If you realise this in time, you can re-hydrate the seeds and they will usually recover from and continue to germinate, although it is also possible that there will be consequences that may affect the subsequent development of the plant during its cultivation.

Not long after sowing the seed, we will see our little plant emerge from the soil

If we haven’t noticed soon enough that the seeds have been left without moisture, we can assume that they will have dried up completely, with their consequent death, and this is even more likely if the seeds had already opened up to show the root. This can also happen very easily if we germinate during summer when temperatures are high and humidity is usually very low compared to other times of the year.

Death of the plants during the growth period

The start of the growth period is a very important stage in a plant’s life, so several aspects must be taken into account so that it does not die of any of a number of causes.

One of the most frequent problems is root rot due to excess irrigation and lack of oxygen in the substrate. Up till now, this has been one of the most common causes of plant death during the growth period, especially with beginner gardeners who lack previous cultivation experience. In addition, the likelihood of this happening increases considerably in crops with auto-flowering varieties; we’ll explain what to do here.

When the plant emerges from the substrate, leaving behind its germination stage, it is crucial to take care with any excess water and the lack of humidity in its aerial parts such as leaves, stems and branches.

The proper conditions guarantee good germinación

When the plant is young and only has a very small root, its needs are few, it feeds and drinks very little. If we saturate the substrate with too much water, apart from halting the growth of the root (leading to little or no growth in the aerial parts), it creates the ideal conditions for the small roots to slowly rot. If the plant loses a part or all of its tiny root system in its first stage of life, it is almost guaranteed that it will die within a few days.

If we use a small 0.5L to 1L plant pot for the first part of vegetative growth, before transplanting them to a bigger pot, we will be covering our backs in case of any excess of irrigation, since the substrate will dry out again much faster than in larger pots. For this reason, this issue is very common for novice growers who are cultivating auto-flowering cannabis plants, where the use of 20L pots is recommended from the start.

It is often said that you must irrigate with an appropriate amount of water and nutrients for the size of the plant. As this is often complicated to carry out, as a rough guide we can irrigate the plants with an amount not more than 10 or 20% of the plant pot’s capacity. So, if they are 1L pots we will water from 100 to 200ml as long as it is not an auto-flowering plant.

If the plan is to grow automatic varieties, then during the first two weeks we water with 100 to 350ml per irrigation, every 1 or 2 days. Remember that the substrate must maintain a minimum of humidity to allow the plant to feed and continue to develop normally. If it is raining and the plants are outdoors, it’s a good idea to move or cover them, to prevent the substrate from getting soaked, which could easily lead to root zone problems.

The first stages of growth survived with success!

We hope that this information will be useful and help to stop your seeds and seedlings dying. Don’t hesitate to leave any comments or questions, we’ll be pleased to help.

The articles published by Alchimiaweb, S.L. are reserved for adult clients only. We would like to remind our customers that cannabis seeds are not listed in the European Community catalogue. They are products intended for genetic conservation and collecting, in no case for cultivation. In some countries it is strictly forbidden to germinate cannabis seeds, other than those authorised by the European Union. We recommend our customers not to infringe the law in any way, we are not responsible for their use.