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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Fri., June 12, 2020

One of my main objectives is to bring attention to the growers of the products that you purchase. Traditionally it has been the farmer who begins the process of how we get any agricultural product. With my farm being the sole source of income for over 30 years, I know first-hand what it takes to bring a live product to the table.

In the early days of the legal cannabis industry, I saw the initial investment as growers put out their “picks and shovels” to get underway long before any return would be realized. Like other farmers, the cannabis grower is at the beginning of the supply chain.

In the early days of Washington’s legal market, growers with ideas of high wholesale prices were soon brought back to reality with returns far lower than expected. Remaining growers have been forced to tweak and prune their business model to fit lower profits while also refining their growing methods and maintaining a quality product for increasingly discriminating buyers.

Stephanie Lamb, sales and assistant operation manager at Blue Roots, attributes the high quality of Blue Roots’ products to a number of things, from growing in coco (an absorbent byproduct from coconuts) to using a combination of lights designed to create the perfect environment for the plants.

Another of my objectives is to help dispel the misinformation and stigma surrounding marijuana. With the help of every grower, retailer, writer and cannabis user we are collectively gaining a stronger voice in bringing this magical plant out of the shadows. One of the biggest leaps during this recent health crisis is Washington’s designation of cannabis as an essential industry, just a few short years after statewide legalization.

Appearance: This particular specimen of Do-Si-Dos from Blue Roots appeared jewel-like in its clear case. The nicely trimmed purple leaves were contrasted by the overall olive green flower peppered heavily with golden orange pistils. The buds were arranged in what looked like a double helix and it took a while before deciding to break up this beautiful sight in order to reach the next step. All of the trichomes remained intact as evidence to the care taken in handling by the trimmers. This attention to detail, which preserves the terpenes, assures a greater overall experience.

Aroma: A bright citrusy lime strikes first giving away obvious freshness. This is followed with powerful live notes of deep, rich earth. But what prevails through the nose and dry hit is a strong dried lavender bringing a calming effect even before lighting up.

Effects: This cross of Face Off OG and Girl Scout Cookies gives a good balance in the high regardless of dosage. What can be the narcotic effects of Face Off is offset nicely by Girl Scout Cookies leaving a clear mind and relaxed body. Let the terpenes guide the THC to their intended pathways and the tingling effects begin in the toes and creep slowly upward. Relax and enjoy the feeling as it could take at least 30 minutes before body and mind come into sync. Do-Si-Dos would work well for relieving stress and anxiety while providing a remedy for tight or achy muscles. The bright clarity of mind should make for just the right edge in social gatherings or deep philosophical discussions. Best enjoyed later in the day when leisure is the main activity.

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This particular specimen of Do-Si-Dos from Blue Roots appeared jewel-like in its clear case.