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effects of adderall and weed

Drug Interactions between Adderall and cannabis

This report displays the potential drug interactions for the following 2 drugs:

  • Adderall (amphetamine/dextroamphetamine)
  • cannabis

Interactions between your drugs

No interactions were found between Adderall and cannabis. This does not necessarily mean no interactions exist. Always consult your healthcare provider.

Adderall

A total of 177 drugs are known to interact with Adderall.

  • Adderall is in the drug class CNS stimulants.
  • Adderall is used to treat the following conditions:
    • ADHD
    • Narcolepsy

cannabis

A total of 378 drugs are known to interact with cannabis.

  • Cannabis is in the drug class illicit (street) drugs.
  • Cannabis is used to treat the following conditions:
    • AIDS Related Wasting
    • Muscle Spasm
    • Nausea/Vomiting, Chemotherapy Induced
    • Pain

Drug and food interactions

amphetamine

Applies to: Adderall (amphetamine / dextroamphetamine)

Using amphetamine together with alcohol can increase the risk of cardiovascular side effects such as increased heart rate, chest pain, or blood pressure changes. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with amphetamine. Let your doctor know if you experience severe or frequent headaches, chest pain, and/or a fast or pounding heartbeat. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

dextroamphetamine

Applies to: Adderall (amphetamine / dextroamphetamine)

Using dextroamphetamine together with alcohol can increase the risk of cardiovascular side effects such as increased heart rate, chest pain, or blood pressure changes. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with dextroamphetamine. Let your doctor know if you experience severe or frequent headaches, chest pain, and/or a fast or pounding heartbeat. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

cannabis (Schedule I substance)

Applies to: cannabis

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of cannabis (Schedule I substance) such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with cannabis (Schedule I substance). Do not use more than the recommended dose of cannabis (Schedule I substance), and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

Therapeutic duplication warnings

No warnings were found for your selected drugs.

Therapeutic duplication warnings are only returned when drugs within the same group exceed the recommended therapeutic duplication maximum.

See Also

  • Adderall Drug Interactions
  • Adderall General Consumer Information
  • Cannabis Drug Interactions
  • Drug Interactions Checker
Drug Interaction Classification
These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences.

View drug interactions between Adderall and cannabis. These medicines may also interact with certain foods or diseases.

The impact of cannabis and stimulant disorders on diagnostic stability in psychosis

Affiliation

  • 1 InforMH, Macquarie Hospital, PO Box 169, North Ryde NSW 1670 Australia ([email protected]).
  • PMID: 24813404
  • DOI: 10.4088/JCP.13m08878

Free article

The impact of cannabis and stimulant disorders on diagnostic stability in psychosis

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Authors

Affiliation

  • 1 InforMH, Macquarie Hospital, PO Box 169, North Ryde NSW 1670 Australia ([email protected]).
  • PMID: 24813404
  • DOI: 10.4088/JCP.13m08878

Abstract

Background: Substance abuse adds to diagnostic uncertainty in psychosis and may increase the risk of transition from brief and affective psychoses to schizophrenia. This study examined whether comorbid substance disorder was associated with diagnostic instability and progression from other psychosis diagnoses to schizophrenia and whether effects differed for cannabis and stimulant-related disorders.

Method: We identified 24,306 individuals admitted to hospital with an ICD-10 psychosis diagnosis between 2000 and 2011. We examined agreement between initial diagnosis and final diagnosis over 2-5 years and predictors of diagnostic change toward and away from a final diagnosis of schizophrenia.

Results: Nearly half (46%) of participants with initial brief, atypical, or drug-induced psychoses were later diagnosed with schizophrenia. Persisting illicit drug disorders did not increase the likelihood of progression to schizophrenia (OR = 0.97; 95% CI, 0.89-1.04) but increased the likelihood of revision of index psychosis diagnosis away from schizophrenia (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.40-1.71). Cannabis disorders predicted an increased likelihood of progression to schizophrenia (OR =1.12; 95% CI, 1.01-1.24), while stimulant disorders predicted a reduced likelihood (OR = 0.81; 95% CI, 0.67-0.97). Stimulant disorders were associated with greater overall diagnostic instability.

Conclusions: Many people with initial diagnoses of brief and affective psychoses are later diagnosed with schizophrenia. Cannabis disorders are associated with diagnostic instability and greater likelihood of progression to schizophrenia. By contrast, comorbid stimulant disorders may be associated with better prognosis in psychosis, and it may be important to avoid premature closure on a diagnosis of schizophrenia when stimulant disorders are present.

© Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Many people with initial diagnoses of brief and affective psychoses are later diagnosed with schizophrenia. Cannabis disorders are associated with diagnostic instability and greater likelihood of progression to schizophrenia. By contrast, comorbid stimulant disorders may be associated with better pr …