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homemade big bud fertilizer

Marijuana Homemade Fertilizers, Easy and Simple

Natural home-made fertilizers

Cannabis, like any other plant, may also need extra help for better growth.

There are natural fertilizers that you can make yourself in a simple way.

Most plants can use a fertilizer or organic substrates to help them grow healthy, vigorous and full of vitality. Natural fertilizers have been used for centuries and have served to obtain abundant, disease-free crops with spectacular growth as they provide the plant with all the minerals and organic compounds it needs to grow healthy and strong.

Here we show you some of the best known and best results give for the crop of our beloved plant. 😉

However, if you prefer to use fertilizers available on the market, remember that in our “Fertilizers and Stimulants” section you can find them at the best price.

Coffee grounds

Coffee grounds, excellent fertilizer for the growth phase.

A fertilizer for the growth phase

The use of coffee grounds as a natural fertilizer has long been well known, and it is also one of the most commonly used homemade marijuana fertilizers.

Coffee grounds are acidic and favour the development of acetic bacteria in the substrate, containing about 2% nitrogen and other organic nutrients.

A good way to prepare a good cannabis fertilizer is to add the coffee grounds to your composting tank or composter, or to mix with the substrate at a proportion of 2 grams of coffee grounds for each liter of soil approximately, but you must control the pH well since they can make the substrate too acidic, try to keep it between 6 and 6.5 so that there are no problems. If you mix the coffee grounds with other homemade fertilizers, try not to exceed 20% in order not to decompensate.

Another way to use coffee is to dilute the coffee ground from the coffee machine in one liter of water, and let the mixture stand for 24 hours. After this time we already have a good dose of fertilizer for our plants. In this case, we do not use the sediment directly as fertilizer, but the mother water (water in contact with the unsoluble coffe ground) derived from the digestion of the sediment (sedimented coffee).

Wood ashes

Wood ash, very effective in preventing pests.

Fertilizer for the final flowering phase

Always using wood from broadleaves trees; it’s another good natural fertilizer for marijuana. We can get the wood ashes from a barbecue made with logs or from a chimney in which we use only wood. The result of the wood combustion is a substance rich in potassium and phosphorus (10% in the form of potassium oxide), so we have a mineral fertilizer suitable for the final flowering phase, used individually or combined with some resin enhancer.

One way to prepare ash for fertilization is to collect it shortly after the wood has burned and store it in a dry place. It is best to apply it mixed with other organic substrates since it is almost exclusively mineral residue. A good mixture can contain from 1 to 2 grams of ash for each liter of substrate at most, which will provide food for your plants and are also very effective in preventing pests. Don’t overdo it by adding ashes because they raise the PH of the substrate and can make it very alkaline.

And now you may irrigate your cannabis plants in flowering phase with the nutrient solution. Another of the most useful homemade fertilizers for your collection.

Banana Tea

Banana tea provides amino acids assimilated by the plant

Full cycle flowering fertilizer

This fruit is known for being one of the most potassium-rich natural products. Potassium is a key element, which is used in all stages of cannabis plant development, and is also one of the three main macronutrients component of NPK (you can see it on the label), which we can all see in regular commercial fertilizers.

Potassium helps the plant assimilate sugars, starches and carbohydrates in general, which is why it is so essential for the plant’s flowering, as it helps to increase energy reserves and the construction of complex carbohydrates that give structure to leaves, stems and buds.

Potassium is also essential because it is associated with the biosynthesis of proteins related to terpenes, the absorption of water by the roots and the regulation of the stomata cell guards for its opening and closing.

In addition to this essential element, banana tea also provides amino acids assimilated by the plant so that we can say that it is an organic-mineral fertilizer.

This tea is applied during the last six weeks of flowering. With this you will get up to 20% more fattening in your buds. It is a kind of PK that we use to make the flowers gain weight, density and hardness, since the dry skins of the bananas basically contain these elements:

  • Phosphorus…………………… 3.25%
  • Potassium…………………… 45%

A good fertilizer for marijuana, without a doubt, one of the best.

Nettle Tea

Nettle tea is a product that provides insect repellent plant active ingredients.

Fertilizer of foliar application and preventive insecticide

Nettle tea (urtica urens) rather than a fertilizer is a product that provides active plant principles of repellent activity on insects such as aphids, whiteflies and mites, but can also be considered fertilizer because of its high content in organic nitrogen and mineral components.

Its application is mainly foliar, although it can also be used in irrigation, and it is very easy to prepare since we only have to follow the same steps as in the banana tea preparation.

It has a strong and characteristic smell, there are even brands of biocides/fertilizers that commercialize this kind of preparations or fertilizers for cannabis like Agrobeta or General Hydroponics, even labeled as deficiency correctors. You can find it under the name of Nettle Purine, and its composition is based mainly on Nitrogen and Iron:

It’s a great product that enters us into organic farming as good natural fertilizers that they are.

Brewer’s yeast

Brewer’s yeast, rich in minerals, amino acids and proteins

Multipurpose fertilizer

Brewer’s yeast has normally been promoted as an excellent food for human use, but due to its wealth of minerals, amino acids and proteins it has been proposed as an excellent organic-mineral fertilizer, qualified also as a good natural fertilizer for plants.

How to use it to make organic compost for marijuana plants?

The preparation that we can make to fertilize consists of a small spoonful of beer yeast dissolved in a liter of water, we will obtain another good fertilizer, in this case for flowering of cannabis, since it is very rich in phosphorus and potassium. Prepare only the mixture that you are going to use in that moment, calculate the amount of water that you need to water, add a spoonful of beer yeast for each liter of water (teaspoon) stir well the mixture and water slowly until you see that it begins to drain water by the bottom of the flowerpots.

Due to its high content of other minerals and organic compounds we can consider this fertilizer as a multipurpose one for the whole plant cycle.

If you use it you will notice the difference!

Egg shell

Egg shell, calcium deficiency correcting fertilizer

Calcium deficiency correcting fertilizer

An excellent calcium corrector that we can use in our preparations with cannabis fertilizers are the homemade fertilizers based on eggshells. This type of fertilizer is used to offer an extra contribution of calcium to our cannabis plant, but in addition it is source of other elements, check out what a good distribution it has by each 100 grams of eggshell:

  • Calcium ……………….. 380mg
  • Magnesium …………. 375mg
  • Phosphorus ……………. 99,3mg
  • Potassium ……………. 41,6mg
  • Iron ……………….. 0,5mg

It is prepared by crushing in a mortar or grinding 6 egg shells (try to leave the internal white membrane that remains stuck in the shell to take advantage of all the nutrients) and once they are reduced to their minimum expression they have to be boiled. To do this we put a pot with 2 liters of water on the fire, we add the crushed shells and a spoonful of Epson Salts, about 15 grams, and when the water starts to boil we wait 5 minutes while we stir the mixture.

After that time we remove the pot from the fire and cover it with a cloth for about 24 hours so that all the nutrients are released and remain in the water. Later we filter the water with the help of a kitchen strainer, and we already have prepared our homemade egg-shell based fertilizer for our cannabis plants, which can be applied directly, although it is advisable to always adjust the PH.

The ideal option is to use it as soon as possible, as it happens with all the homemade fertilizers, but if you keep it in a dark, fresh and dry place it can last up to 3 months.

Calcium deficiency is not very common in marijuana, since it is a very common component in irrigation water that is not distilled or osmotized, but bear in mind that the marijuana plant requires almost as much calcium as nitrogen, and that is why many commercial brands of fertilizers for hydroponics incorporate it in their formulas.

Mix the resulting nutrient solution with some fertilizer rich in nitrogen for the growth phase, or phosphorus and potassium for the flowering phase, although you can use it as calcium corrector directly as long as you take into account the pH value.

Animal faeces

Animal faeces, one of the most universal fertilizers for marijuana

Full cycle fertilizer

Although it may not seem too pleasant, animal faeces are one of the most universal fertilizers for marijuana. It is a high-quality organic fertilizer. In order to use this type of homemade fertilizer for plants, it is necessary to collect the dried animal faeces from species such as sheep, goat, horse, rabbit, and cow, some bird species are also suitable, including the famous Guano, which is obtained from bats.

Before using this type of fertilizer you should know that some have to be composted for two months or more before adding it to your garden substrate, since the composting process kills the undergrowth seeds and transforms the nutrients into more useful forms for the plant. I explain below the differences between different types of home fertilizers made from manure and their doses:

  • Cow manure: In conventional agriculture they do not wait for it to ferment, but they apply it far from the plants so as not to burn them, although it is not a very strong fertilizer. It is also used to heat the soil in cold areas, and is normally mixed at a rate of 1 to 5 kilos per m2 of soil.
  • Rabbit manure: In this case it is essential to expose the rabbit faeces to the sun for several months as it is quite acidic and strong when fresh. In this case it is mixed between 100 and 400 grams per m2, you know that it is better to run a little short than to overdo it.
  • Horse manure: It is necessary to leave it in the sun until it stops smelling, although it must be said that it is not very rich in nutrients. It can be added with a proportion similar to that of a cow, that is, from 1 to 5 kilos/m2, but the ideal is to apply it together with other fertilizers.
  • Sheep or goat manure: It is the best because of the distribution of nutrients it contains, and it is much more powerful than cow or horse manure, so generally less quantity is needed, but you can add from 500 grams to 2 kilos/m2.
  • Chicken manure: It is very acidic, even more so than rabbit manure, and it is not very rich in nutrients, except for the Calcium, which it contains in quantity, something that must be taken into account, since it should not be applied to basic or calcareous soils. The recommended dose is from 50 to 300 grams/m2 of soil.

Lentils or bean tea

Lentils or bean tea, root stimulants rich in auxins

Root stimulants rich in auxins

Auxins represent a very important group of phytohormones that regulate plant growth and phototropism (movement of leaves and stems in search of light), causing the branches to grow vertically by elongation of plant cells.

Auxins have been traditionally used in gel form for root development in cuttings and seedlings, as is the case of Clonex, one of the best known marijuana products, and although it is true that the Auxins work very well in synthetic form, we can also find them in nutrient solutions formed by organic products such as seaweeds, and teas made of seeds rich in auxins, as happens with certain species of beans and other vegetables.

This is one of the best homemade root stimulators that you can make yourself, you only need 100 grams of lentils or beans, 2 saucepans or casseroles, 2 cloths, water and 1 strainer, and the preparation is very simple, I explain it to you in 7 steps so you can understand it better:

  1. Put the 100 grams of lentils in a saucepan, add 1 liter of water and let it rest for 4 hours
  2. Place the strainer over the empty bucket and pour the water without the lentils, which we left in the bucket without water, and cover each bucket with a cloth.
  3. About 24 hours later we remove the clothes and mix the water with the lentils again, wait 15 minutes and repeat step 2.
  4. 1 day later we mix again the water with the lentils for another 15 minutes, and we have to keep doing this until the lentils germinate and their roots are at least 1 cm.
  5. Once the lentils have germinated and have a root, they must be crushed and left mixed with water for at least 1 hour to release all the hormones.
  6. We filter the water one last time and we have our special stimulator for the rooting phase, homemade and cheap.

You can use it directly in watering, and what you have left over remember to store it in a cool, dry and dark place for up to 3 months.

Another eco-friendly homemade cannabis fertilizer at your fingertips!!

Ready-made fertilizers

And, if after reading all these ideas you don’t dare to make any of them, you will always have to go to your trustable grow shop and purchase a high quality manufactured fertilizer. In PEV Grow Shop we offer you fertilizers with specialization in hydroponic growing, showing a deep-rooted culture in nature and ecology.

One of the most complete fertilizer packs you can find at PEV Grow is the Canna Fertilizer Kit, with which you will have all the nutrients your plants need. This kit has 6 fertilizers that you can use depending on the phase of your plant is either growth or flowering.

Canna Fertilizer Kit

In any case, any brand that you choose, don’t forget to consult the fertilizer schedule charts that the manufacturer recommends, in order to optimize the results of your marijuana crop, either in yield, psychoactivity, aroma and flavor.

With this Canna Fertilizer Kit you will have all the food your plants need to cover the full crop cycle, and of course at the best price on your Grow Shop trusted.

Features

Canna Fertilizer Kit is composed of:
– TERRA VEGA (1 Liter)
– CANNA BOOST (250 ml.)
– RHIZOTONIC (250 ml.)
– CANNAZYM (250 ml.)
– PK 13/14 (1 Liter)
– TERRA FLORES (1 Liter)

We hope you liked this post.

Do not hesitate to share your experiences and concerns with us… and you know, if you have any technical questions do not wait any longer and call us…. we are here to serve you!??

Find out how to make your own fertilizers for marijuana ✅ Create your homemade fertilizers with organic products ⭐ 100% NATURAL!

Homemade big bud fertilizer

There was a time when people gardened because backyard produce was far better and cheaper than anything from the store. To tell the truth, it still is, or at least it still can be. The trick is knowing that back in the day, people used their own compost and homemade fertilizers.

Yet some are convinced that you have to spend a bundle of money to have a really nice, healthy garden. I think that this misconception grew out of the fact that most people have backyards that are filled with really poor/weak soil.

The reasons for this are complicated—a subject for another day. Suffice it to say that if the soil is weak, your plants will also be weak. And so it follows that weak plants have poor production, leading to more time and money spent on a low quantity of low-quality vegetables.

Healthy Soil Equals Healthy Plants

This means that you need to enrich your soil. Because most people are not making their own compost at home, they need to buy fertilizer. Plant fertilizers purchased from the local garden center often contain chemicals that may harm your plants, and are not environmentally friendly.

In addition, fertilizer can be a bit pricey, and this is most likely why the myth that home gardens are expensive continues. This is not necessarily true. You needn’t spend a bundle of money because, believe it or not, you are full of fertilizer!

Make Your Own Homemade Fertilizers

Making your own organic plant food is easy and fun. It should be noted that most people understand that the best way to get good garden soil is to use compost to amend the soil. Of course, that is true. Compost can be made at home out of leftover food scraps and lawn clippings, and so it is virtually cost-free.

Composting may be all one needs for a successful home vegetable crop. If, however, the soil is still lacking in nutrients or if you are planting a more demanding vegetable garden, augmenting with another type of fertilizer may be advisable. So why spend good money on store bought fertilizer when you can make it yourself with just a little information?

Nourishing Nutrients for Prolific Plants

The key to a good garden is good soil. Of the essential nutrients plants need to thrive, most of them are found in soil. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and to a lesser extent calcium, magnesium, and sulfur are called macronutrients, and these are the nutrients that plants need most.

The remaining micronutrients can be supplied in smaller amounts even by some of the poorest soils out there.

While it may not be the most exciting of gardening topics, nothing is more important than having a basic understanding of fertilizer. Just like you and I need nourishment—so do plants. Understanding just a small bit of information about fertilizer can go a long way toward helping your garden to grow big, strong, healthy plants on a light budget. Before we look at some inexpensive homemade fertilizers, let’s look briefly at the subject in general. All fertilizers fall into one of two basic categories: chemical/synthetic or natural/organic.

Organic Fertilizers Versus Synthetic Fertilizers

Chemical/synthetic fertilizers are manufactured using synthetic substances that usually contain highly concentrated forms of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (these are the N-P-K values listed on the fertilizer packaging).

These fertilizers work quickly because they feed the plants directly. But they do come with a downside—they do not improve the soil itself and they can, over time, even destroy the beneficial organisms needed for healthy soil. When you use large quantities of this inorganic stuff over and over again, its byproducts will actually build up in the soil and in time they can hinder plant growth.

Organic/natural fertilizers often use alfalfa meal, cottonseed meal, or fish emulsion to provide nitrogen; bone meal or rock phosphate to provide phosphorus; and kelp meal or granite meal to provide potassium.

The downside here is that they work much more slowly, first breaking down in the soil into forms that the plant roots can more easily absorb, then making their way up the plant roots to your hungry plants.

Organic/natural fertilizers, on the other hand, don’t feed the plants directly but rather add essential nutrients to the soil where they become available to the plants, more slowly, over time.

Understanding the Basics about N-P-K

While there are also many important micronutrients in good fertilizer, it is understanding the “big 3,” the N-P-K, that is the key to making your own effective fertilizer at home. The N is for nitrogen, the P for phosphorus, and the K for Potassium. Each has an important role to play in the health of your garden.

Nitrogen is the nutrient plants use most to grow large and lush—tall stems with lots of good leafy growth. If you examine the N-P-K content of commercial products that advertise “miracle growth” you will find there is no real miracle at all—the amazing growth is due to a balanced but high N-P-K ratio with a hefty amount of nitrogen in the mix.

Phosphorus is needed to grow strong healthy root systems, and to promote vigorous flowering. Commercial “blooming” mixes are usually high in phosphorus.

Potassium helps with plant growth, protein production, plant hardiness, disease resistance, insect resistance and efficient water use. Plants without enough potassium grow slowly and can have yellow leaves.

Less Is More

Always remember the one basic rule that applies to the use of all fertilizers—”less is more.” If you use too much fertilizer or too strong a concentration, you could do much more harm than good. Plant roots can be harmed and you will soon see the tell-tale symptoms of fertilizer burn—brown, curled leaf edges and leaves that wither and fall from the stem. Always err on the side of caution—”less is more!”

Now, with a simple understanding of the information above, you are ready to get out and make your own fertilizer. For my purposes I needed a good, effective, general use fertilizer. Here are a few of the solutions that have brought me success:

Easy Household Fertilizers

There are quite a few common items found in your kitchen, and elsewhere around the house, that can be used as plant fertilizer.

Aquarium Water

Water your plants with the aquarium water taken right out of the tank when cleaning it. Fresh water only please, do not use water from a salt water tank. The fish waste makes a great plant fertilizer.

Bananas

Bananas are not only tasty and healthy for humans, but they also benefit many different plants. When planting roses, bury a banana (or just the peel) in the hole alongside the rose. As the rose grows, bury bananas or banana peels into the top layer of the soil. Both of these approaches will provide the much-needed potassium that plants need for proper growth.

Blackstrap Molasses

Blackstrap molasses is an excellent source of many different nutrients that plants use. This includes carbon, iron, sulfur, potash, calcium, manganese, potassium, copper, and magnesium. What makes this an excellent type of fertilizer is that it feeds beneficial bacteria, which keep the soil and plants healthy. To use blackstrap molasses as a fertilizer, mix it with another all-purpose fertilizer. A good combination to use is 1 cup each of epsom salts and alfalfa meal. Dissolve this combination in 4 gallons of water and top it off with 1 tablespoon of blackstrap molasses. Or simply mix blackstrap molasses in with compost tea. Do this only after the compost tea has steeped.

Coffee Grounds

Used coffee grounds contain about 2% nitrogen, about a third of a percent of phosphoric acid, and varying amounts of potash (generally less than 1%). Coffee grounds are particularly useful on those plants that like things a bit more acidic, such as blueberries, evergreens, azaleas, roses, camellias, avocados, and many fruit trees. I recommend that you allow the coffee grounds to dry and then scatter them lightly, as a mulch, around your plants. Avoid scattering them thickly when they are wet, because clumps of coffee grounds have a tendency to get moldy.

Cooking Water

Many different nutrients are released into the water that food is cooked in. Water that is used to boil potatoes, vegetables, eggs, and even pasta can be used as a fertilizer. Just remember to let the water cool before applying it to your soil.

Corn Gluten Meal

Corn gluten meal is a byproduct of the wet-milling process for corn. It is used not only as an organic pre-emergent herbicide, but also as a fertilizer that is 10% nitrogen. To use as a fertilizer, simply spread a thin layer of corn gluten meal and scratch it into the top inch of soil. Plant veggie starts inside the treated area for optimum nitrogen benefit, and do not worry about accidentally harming your plants. Corn gluten meal only works as an herbicide before seeds germinate, not after, so it won’t hurt plants that have already sprouted.

Egg Shells

Egg shells contain about 1% nitrogen, about a half-percent phosphoric acid, and other trace elements that make them a practical fertilizer. Calcium is an essential plant nutrient which plays a fundamental part in cell manufacture and growth. Most roots must have some calcium at the growing tips to grow effectively. Plant growth removes large quantities of calcium from the soil, and calcium must be replenished, so this is an ideal way to “recycle” your egg shells. Simply crush them, powder them in an old coffee grinder, and sprinkle them around your garden soil.

Epsom Salts

1 tablespoon of epsom salts can be combined with 1 gallon of water and put into a sprayer. Apply once a month, directly to the foliage, for a quick dose of magnesium and sulfur.

Wood Ash (From Your Fireplace or Fire Pit)

Ashes can be sprinkled onto your soil to supply potassium and calcium carbonate. Hardwood is best—and no charcoal or lighter fluid, please, as this can harm your plants. Don’t use ash in areas where you are trying to maintain acid-loving plants—the ashes are alkaline and can increase alkalinity in the soil.

Gelatin

Gelatin can be a great nitrogen source. Dissolve 1 package of gelatin in 1 cup of hot water and then add 3 cups of cold water. Pour directly on the soil around your plants once a month. This is great for houseplants!

Green Tea

A weak solution of green tea can be used to water plants every 4 weeks. Use 1 teabag to 2 gallons of water.

Hair

Hair is a good source of nitrogen, and it does double duty as a deer repellent. A good source for this hair is not only your hairbrush, but also the local barbershop or beauty salon. Many of these establishments will save hair for your garden, if you ask them for it. But do not limit yourself to only human hair. Dog hair, horse hair, and cat hair work just as well.

Horse Feed

What makes horse feed irresistible to horses is also what makes it an excellent fertilizer. The magic ingredient is molasses. To use horse feed as a fertilizer is simple and easy. It can be used as a soil amendment just by sprinkling it on top of the soil. Alternatively, it can be dissolved in water alone or combined with another organic fertilizer, and applied as a soil drench.

Matches

The old-fashioned easy-strike matches are a great source of magnesium. To use this as a fertilizer, simply place the whole match in the hole with the plant, or soak the matches in water. The magnesium will dissolve into the water and make application easier.

Powdered Milk

Powdered milk is not only good for human consumption but also for plants. This source of calcium needs to be mixed in to the soil prior to planting. Since the milk is in powder form, it is ready for use by your plants.

4 Easy Homemade Fertilizer Recipes

These are some slightly more complex fertilizer recipes that I like to use. My favorites are the Simple Tea and the Quick Fix, but each of these make regular appearances in our garden fertilizing schedule:

Recipe #1—Simple Tea Fertilizer

This simple recipe has been used for thousands of years. Give it a try in your garden for a quick and inexpensive dose of nutrients for your plants.

Instructions

• In a 5 gallon bucket, mix 1/4 cup of epsom salts, 2 cups of urine (yes, good old pee pee), and 2 cups of wood ash (again, no lighter fluid or charcoal, please).
• Fill the rest of the bucket about half way with grass clippings, pruned green leaves, or even green weeds pulled right out of the ground.
• Fill the bucket to the top with water and allow the mix to steep for three days.
• After steeping, strain the tea or decant into empty milk jugs or old 2 liter bottles.
• Before use, dilute by 50% by mixing half water and half tea into your favorite watering can.
• Apply this wonderful mix by pouring it directly onto the soil around your plants.

If your results are anything like mine, you will see a noticeable difference in just a few days.

Note: Only steep for 3 days. By the third day, most of the soluble nutrients will have seeped out into the water solution. Stopping now prevents fermentation, which you want to avoid. Fermented materials will smell bad, and their pH can change rapidly, so it’s important to stick with a 3-day steeping, and then use the concentrate within a day or 2.

Recipe #2—Homemade Fish Emulsion Fertilizer

Fish emulsion is a homemade fertilizer made using fish waste—such as fish parts and guts—and water. This organic all-purpose fertilizer has also been around for thousands of years and it works great, but it takes weeks to make, and the mixture must have time to rot before you can use it. Yes, there is some bad smell here—it is made from rotting fish, after all!

Instructions

• To begin the process, fill a 55-gallon drum about one-third full with a ratio of 2 parts water and 1 part fish waste.
• Allow this mixture to steep for 24 hours.
• After steeping, add more water to the drum until it is completely full.
• Cover loosely and let the drum ferment for several weeks—we usually allow about 3 weeks for fermentation.
• To use, apply the fish emulsion fertilizer to the soil around your plants at a rate of 3 gallons of liquid for every 100 square feet of yard or garden.

Recipe #3—Seaweed Fertilizer

Another fertilizer with a thousand-year pedigree. Not only is seaweed an all-purpose organic fertilizer, but it also contains mannitol. Mannitol is a compound that increases a plant’s ability to absorb nutrients in the soil. Either fresh or dried seaweed can be used to create the all-purpose fertilizer. However, if you use fresh seaweed or dry, salted seaweed, ensure it is thoroughly washed before using.

Instructions

• Add 8 cups of chopped seaweed to a 5 gallon bucket and fill halfway with water. (Rainwater is always best if it’s available.)
• Loosely cover the container, and let the seaweed steep for about 3 weeks.
• After steeping, strain the seaweed and transfer the liquid to a container to store it for up to 3 weeks.
• To use, mix half water and half seaweed tea into your favorite watering can and apply it to the soil around your plants. Your plants will thank you for it within just a few days.

Recipe #4—The Quick Fix Fertilizer

If you haven’t got time to wait 3 days to make the Simple Tea, you might want to try this idea. Most of the ingredients can be found around your home.

Instructions

• In an empty 1 gallon milk jug, mix 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon of ammonia (a very strong source of quick nitrogen), 3 teaspoons of instant iced tea (the tannic acid in this helps the plants to more quickly and easily absorb nutrients), 3 teaspoons blackstrap molasses (this helps feed soil bacteria), 3 tablespoons of 3% hydrogen peroxide (hydrogen peroxide is a powerful oxidizer, as it combines with the air and water as it decomposes, freeing the oxygen elements and thus providing a supplement of oxygen to the plants and aerating the soil), 1/4 cup crushed bone scraps (this adds phosphorus—any bones will do but I like to use fish bones myself as they also provide potassium), 1 crushed eggshell or 1/2 a dried banana peel for potassium (you can omit if using fish bones, but I would still add the eggshell for the calcium—especially for tomatoes, as it helps prevent blossom end rot)
• Fill the jug the rest of the way with water (again, rainwater is best). Replace cap and allow the jug to sit in the sun for about 1 hour to warm, then water your plants with this mixture at full strength.

Using What Your Animals Give You

There are many other ways to make your own fertilizer, and some are easier to make than others. It doesn’t get much easier than using manure from your animals. For eons, man used “free” fertilizer from manure to fertilize his crops. Manure can be used as is after drying, or in the form of manure tea.

Before manure is used in the garden, it should be aged and dried, and/or composted first. Age fresh manure for at least 6 months. Well-aged manure on its own makes a great fertilizer for garden plants. You can spread aged manure directly on top of your garden soil at a thickness of 1/4 to 1/2 inch. Another option is to till it, or mix it by hand, into the top layer of soil in the fall or winter, prior to spring planting.

Generally, fall is the best time to use manure in the garden. This allows plenty of time for the manure to break down, eliminating the threat of burning plants in the garden come springtime. As the soil absorbs manure, nutrients are released. This enriches the soil, which in turn helps the plants. One of the most important benefits of using manure in the garden is its ability to condition the soil.

Composting manure is one of the best and safest ways to use this free fertilizer, as it eliminates the possibility of burning your plants and controls potentially harmful bacteria.

Nearly any kind of manure can be used. Generally horse, cow, and chicken manures are the most commonly used for manure fertilizer. Some people also use sheep, rabbit, turkey, and more. It is not recommended that you use manure from your cats, dogs, other household pets – or any other meat-eating animals. These manures are unsuitable for the garden or the compost pile, as they are likely to carry parasites.

Making Manure Tea Fertilizer

I will leave you with one last recipe. I use this tea regularly and it works great—just make sure that your manure is well-aged and comes from animals that have not been grazing on fields treated with broad-leaf herbicides, such as Grazon.

Bonus Recipe: Manure Tea Fertilizer

Manure tea enriches the soil and adds much-needed nutrients for healthy plant growth. The nutrients found in manure tea make it an ideal fertilizer for garden plants. The nutrients from manure dissolve easily in water so that they can then be added to a sprayer or simply used in a watering can. The leftover manure can be thrown in the garden or reused in the compost pile.

Manure tea can be used each time you water plants, or periodically. It can also be used to water lawns. However, it is important to dilute the tea prior to use so as to avoid burning the roots or foliage of plants. I fill my watering can halfway with the tea and then fill it to the top with rainwater. I use this every 3 weeks or so during the growing season.

Instructions

• Place a shovelful of well-aged manure in a large burlap sack or pillowcase.
• Make certain that the manure has been well aged or “cured” beforehand. Fresh manure is much too strong for plants, and it can contain harmful bacteria.
• Suspend the manure-filled “tea bag” in a 5 gallon bucket, and add water to create a mix of 5 parts water to 1 part manure.
• Allow this mixture to steep for up to 2 weeks.
• After steeping, remove the bag, allowing it to hang above the container until the dripping has stopped.
• Skipping the tea bag and adding the manure directly to the water usually speeds up the brewing process. Without a bag, the tea is usually ready within only a few days if you stir it thoroughly during this period. Once it has fully brewed, you will have to strain it to separate the solids from the liquid. The remaining manure can then be added to the compost pile.
• To use, dilute the tea by half, as mentioned above, prior to use.

Add to This List of Homemade Fertilizers

This list of homemade fertilizers is by no means exhaustive. If I’ve missed any of your favorites, be sure to let me know in the comments below! Keep in mind that the most important thing you really need to understand about making your own fertilizer is that you control what goes into the fertilizer, so you know exactly what goes into your garden and therefore what goes into your body. Making your fertilizer is also a great way to “reduce, reuse, and recycle.”

Lately, before I toss anything into my trash, I stop and ask myself, “How else can I use this?” As often as not, the things I would have otherwise thrown away can help out in my garden. And, best of all, I’ve come to realize that my home, my animals, and even my own body are all full of fertilizer!

The Grow Network is a global network of people who produce their own food and medicine. We’re the coolest bunch of backyard researchers on Earth! We’re constantly sharing, discovering, and working together to test new paths for sustainable living—while reconnecting with the “old ways” that are slipping away in our modern world. We value soil, water, sunlight, simplicity, sustainability, usefulness, and freedom. We strive to produce, prepare, and preserve our own food and medicine, and we hope you do, too!

The Grow Network is a global network of people who produce their own food and medicine. We’re the coolest bunch of backyard researchers on Earth! We’re constantly sharing, discovering, and working together to test new paths for sustainable living—while reconnecting with the “old ways” that are slipping away in our modern world. We value soil, water, sunlight, simplicity, sustainability, usefulness, and freedom. We strive to produce, prepare, and preserve our own food and medicine, and we hope you do, too!