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o. sativa

O. sativa

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Status Reference proteome
Proteins i

Number of protein entries associated with this proteome: UniProtKB entries for regular proteomes or UniParc entries for redundant proteomes (more. )

This is the total number of unique genes found in the proteome set, algorithmically computed. For each gene, a single representative protein sequence is chosen from the proteome. Where possible, reviewed (Swiss-Prot) protein sequences are chosen as the representatives.

The proteome identifier (UPID) is the unique identifier assigned to the set of proteins that constitute the proteome. It consists of the characters ‘UP’ followed by 9 digits, is stable across releases and can therefore be used to cite a UniProt proteome.

Identifier for the genome assembly (more. )

The Benchmarking Universal Single-Copy Ortholog (BUSCO) assessment tool is used, for eukaryotic and bacterial proteomes, to provide quantitative measures of UniProt proteome data completeness in terms of expected gene content. BUSCO scores include percentages of complete (C) single-copy (S) genes, complete (C) duplicated (D) genes, fragmented (F) and missing (F) genes, as well as the total number of orthologous clusters (n) used in the BUSCO assessment.

Complete Proteome Detector (CPD) is an algorithm which employs statistical evaluation of the completeness and quality of proteomes in UniProt, by looking at the sizes of taxonomically close proteomes. Possible values are ‘Standard’, ‘Close to Standard’ and ‘Outlier’.

O. sativa When browsing through different UniProt proteins, you can use the ‘basket’ to save them, so that you can back to find or analyse them later. Select item(s) and click on “Add to

O. sativa

When browsing through different UniProt proteins, you can use the ‘basket’ to save them, so that you can back to find or analyse them later.

Select item(s) and click on “Add to basket” to create your own collection here
(400 entries max)

  • UniProtKB ( 0 )
  • UniRef ( 0 )
  • UniParc ( 0 )
  • Overview
  • Components
  • Publications

Map to

Select a section on the left to see content.

Overview

Status Reference proteome
Proteins i

Number of protein entries associated with this proteome: UniProtKB entries for regular proteomes or UniParc entries for redundant proteomes (more. )

This is the total number of unique genes found in the proteome set, algorithmically computed. For each gene, a single representative protein sequence is chosen from the proteome. Where possible, reviewed (Swiss-Prot) protein sequences are chosen as the representatives.

The proteome identifier (UPID) is the unique identifier assigned to the set of proteins that constitute the proteome. It consists of the characters ‘UP’ followed by 9 digits, is stable across releases and can therefore be used to cite a UniProt proteome.

Identifier for the genome assembly (more. )

The Benchmarking Universal Single-Copy Ortholog (BUSCO) assessment tool is used, for eukaryotic and bacterial proteomes, to provide quantitative measures of UniProt proteome data completeness in terms of expected gene content. BUSCO scores include percentages of complete (C) single-copy (S) genes, complete (C) duplicated (D) genes, fragmented (F) and missing (F) genes, as well as the total number of orthologous clusters (n) used in the BUSCO assessment.

Complete Proteome Detector (CPD) is an algorithm which employs statistical evaluation of the completeness and quality of proteomes in UniProt, by looking at the sizes of taxonomically close proteomes. Possible values are ‘Standard’, ‘Close to Standard’ and ‘Outlier’.

Oryza sativa (rice) is a monocotyledonous flowering plant of the family Poaceae and is one of the most important crop plants in the world, providing the principal food source for half of the world’s population.

Oryza sativa subsp. japonica is one of three major subspecies of rice, the others being indica and javanica. Oryza sativa subsp. japonica is short-grained and high in amylopectin so that the grains stick together when cooked, which distinguishes it from subsp. indica which is long grained and not sticky.

Oryza sativa subsp. japonica is grown in dry fields, mainly in temperate or colder climates such as Japan.

O. sativa When browsing through different UniProt proteins, you can use the ‘basket’ to save them, so that you can back to find or analyse them later. Select item(s) and click on “Add to