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OG Jones

breed by Connoisseur Genetics

Here you can find all info about OG Jones from Connoisseur Genetics. If you are searching for information about OG Jones from Connoisseur Genetics, check out our Basic Infos, Cannabinoids, Shop-Finder and Price Comparison or Lineage / Genealogy for this cannabis variety here at this page and follow the links to get even more information. If you have any personal experiences with growing or consuming this cannabis variety, please use the upload links to add them to the database!

Basic / Breeders Info

OG Jones is a mostly sativa variety from Connoisseur Genetics and can be cultivated indoors (where the plants will need a flowering time of ±63 days ) and outdoors . Connoisseur Genetics’ OG Jones is a THC dominant variety and is/was never available as feminized seeds.

Connoisseur Genetics’ OG Jones Description

Hugh yielding Amsterdam coffee shop sensation Casey Jones gets a boost of raw potency & delightful rotten chemmy/kush funk from our OG Chem. Expect big kushy buds with high density that mean support may be needed to keep up the heavy buds. Indica dominant stone that has a unique creative aspect making her very special indeed. Low leaf to bud ratio makes her a pleasure to deal with. Best topped or grown in sea of green.

Genetics: Casey Jones x OG Chem
Flower time: 8-10 weeks
Yield: High

Where to buy OG Jones cannabis seeds?

OG Jones from Connoisseur Genetics is available only as regular seeds. Feminized seeds are not available at the moment. In 4 seedbanks, we found 10 offers between EUR 63.28 for 11 regular seeds and EUR 491.90 for 77 regular seeds. If you are looking to buy OG Jones Cannabis Seeds from Connoisseur Genetics somewhere – have a look to our OG Jones Price Comparison page with all current offers from all the connected seedbanks and shops – or visit one of the following tested, trustworthy and recommended seed-shops directly to check out their current OG Jones offers: Herbies Head Shop, Oaseeds, Seedsman and Cannapot Hanfshop.

OG Jones Cannabinoid Profile

Amount Compared
THC 18.00% average (-0.13%)
THCA 13.50% average (-0.22%)
THCV 0.75% average (+0.14%)
CBG 0.55% average (-0.09%)
CBC 0.40% average (+0.07%)
CBD 0.35% very low (-0.81%)
CBN 0.00% extremely low (-0.11%)
Click here for all tests and more detailed info about the cannabinoids in Connoisseur Genetics’ OG Jones.

OG Jones Lineage / Genealogy

  • OG Jones »»» Casey Jones x OG Chem
  • Casey Jones
    • »»» Oriental Express x ECSD v3
    • Oriental Express
      • »»» Trainwreck x Thailand
      • Trainwreck
        • USA »»» Indica/Sativa Hybrid
      • Thailand »»» Indica/Sativa Hybrid
    • ECSD v3 IBL
      • Sour Diesel
        • »»» Original Diesel x DNL
        • Original Diesel
          • »»» Chemdawg x
          • MassSuperSkunk x SensiNL
            • MassSuperSkunk
              • Super Skunk Probably
                • »»» Skunk #1 x Afghanistan
                • Skunk #1
                  • Skunk #1
                    • Skunk #1
                      • »»» Afghanistan x Mexico x Colombia
                      • Afghanistan »»» Indica
                      • Mexico »»» Sativa
                      • Colombia »»» Sativa
                • Afghanistan »»» Indica
            • SensiNL
              • »»» NL #1 x NL #2 x NL #5
              • NL #1 IBL
                • Afghanistan »»» Indica
              • NL #2
                • Northern Lights
                  • Afghanistan Indica Probably »»» Indica
              • NL #5
                • USA, Kalifornien »»» Mostly Indica
          • Chemdawg
            • Unknown Indica »»» Indica
        • DNL
          • »»» x Northern Lights
          • RFK Skunk x Hawaiian
            • RFK Skunk
              • Unknown Skunk
                • Skunk #1 (specified above)
            • Hawaiian »»» Indica/Sativa Hybrid
          • Northern Lights (specified above)
  • OG Chem
    • »»» x Chemdog D BX2
    • Chem Dawg d x OG Kush
      • Chem Dawg d (specified above)
      • OG Kush Probably
        • »»» Chemdawg x Probably
        • Lemon Thai x Hindu Kush, Pakistan
          • Lemon Thai »»» Sativa
          • Hindu Kush, Pakistan »»» Indica
        • Chemdawg (specified above)
    • Chemdog D BX2
      • »»» Chemdog d x Chemdog D BX#1
      • Chemdog d (specified above)
      • Chemdog D BX#1
        • »»» Chemdog d x Chemdog D Kush
        • Chemdog d (specified above)
        • Chemdog D Kush
          • »»» Chemdog d x Hindu Kush
          • Chemdog d (specified above)
          • Hindu Kush
            • Hindu Kush »»» Indica

Map of the OG Jones Family Tree

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OG Jones breed by Connoisseur Genetics Here you can find all info about OG Jones from Connoisseur Genetics . If you are searching for information about OG Jones from Connoisseur Genetics,

Lakeland Walking Tales

This Is My Church

Scafell & Scafell Pike via Lord’s Rake, the West Wall Traverse and Foxes Tarn

Wainwright declared Scafell Crag, “the greatest display of natural grandeur in the district”, and climbing pioneer, Owen Glynne Jones, thought the Pinnacle “the finest bit of rock scenery in the Scawfell massif”. I set off for Lord’s Rake and the West Wall Traverse to experience these breathtaking crags up close. In the golden hour before dusk, I scramble down Foxes Tarn Gully and up on to Scafell Pike, where sunshine and snow make for a sublime experience.

In our porch are two walking sticks, rough-hewn and robust, cut for hiking. Metal badges decorate their shafts, testimony to myriad adventures; they depict summits, stags, viaducts and mountain villages, and bear Alpine names like Brienzer Rothorn, Grimsel Furka, Jochpass and Brünig. The sticks belonged to Sandy’s great uncles, Tom and Arthur, brothers who shared a love of fell walking, mountaineering and ice-climbing. In the 1940’s, to heed the call of the Alps was to embrace a British passion that was less than a hundred years old.

The Victorians turned mountaineering into a pastime. Alfred Wills’s ascent of the Wetterhorn in 1854 opened the Golden Age of Alpinism, which culminated with Edward Whymper’s ascent of the Matterhorn in 1865. A Silver Age followed, which ended in 1882 when William Woodman Graham reached the summit of the Giant’s Tooth.

Four years later, a new sport was born here, in the English Lake District, when Walter Parry Haskett-Smith climbed Napes Needle, a free standing rock pinnacle on the side of Great Gable. To climb the Needle served no mountaineering purpose. It was rock climbing as sport in its own right. The notion caught on, spearheaded by men like Haskett-Smith and John Robinson, and fostered by the formation of the Fell and Rock Climbing Club in 1906.

Of these early pioneers, one man did perhaps more than any other to fan the flames of interest. His name was Owen Glynne Jones, and what set him apart from his peers was not so much his climbing prowess, remarkable though it was, but the engaging way he wrote about it. Demand for Jones’s book, Rock Climbing in the English Lake District, soon outstripped its initial 1897 publication run.

Abraham Brothers postcard of the Scafell Pinnacle (but is it Owen on the top?)

The book is beautifully illustrated with photographs by the Abraham Brothers of Keswick. George and Ashley Abraham were accomplished climbers, but they were photographers by profession, and their startling images of the Lakes graced many a contemporary postcard. They accompanied Jones on several climbs, but two, in particular, stood out:

“Two climbs with Mr. Jones are most strongly impressed on our memories, and these two would probably rank as the two finest rock climbs made in our district. These are the Scawfell Pinnacle from the second pitch in Deep Ghyll in 1896, and the conquest of the well-known Walker’s Gully on the Pillar Rock in January, 1899. Both of these were generally considered impossible, and it is probably no exaggeration to say that no leader excepting Mr. Jones would have had the confidence to advance beyond the ledge where the last arête commenced on the Scawfell Pinnacle climb.”

Jones describes the Pinnacle as;

“the finest bit of rock scenery in the Scawfell massif. It rises up some 600 feet from the foot of Lord’s Rake in steep and almost unclimbable slabs of smooth rock, forming the left-hand boundary of Deep Ghyll and the right of Steep Ghyll.”

” data-medium-file=”https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Pinnacle-Scafell-Crag-scaled.jpg?fit=300%2C225″ data-large-file=”https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Pinnacle-Scafell-Crag-scaled.jpg?fit=474%2C356″ loading=”lazy” width=”474″ height=”356″ src=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Pinnacle-Scafell-Crag.jpg?resize=474%2C356″ alt=”The Pinnacle and Pisgah Buttress, Scafell Crag” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Pinnacle-Scafell-Crag-scaled.jpg?resize=1024%2C768 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Pinnacle-Scafell-Crag-scaled.jpg?resize=300%2C225 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Pinnacle-Scafell-Crag-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C576 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Pinnacle-Scafell-Crag-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1152 1536w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Pinnacle-Scafell-Crag-scaled.jpg?w=948 948w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/The-Pinnacle-Scafell-Crag-scaled.jpg?w=1422 1422w” sizes=”(max-width: 474px) 100vw, 474px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ /> The Pisgah Buttress and the Pinnacle, Scafell Crag

You don’t have to be a climber to be swept along by the power, humour and joie de vivre in Jones’s writing. His account of their assault on the Pinnacle is a particular highlight:

“My companions were holding an animated discussion below on the subject of photography. The light was excellent, and our positions most artistic. The cameras were left in the cave at the foot of the ghyll. Ashley was afraid I meant to go up without him; but his professional instinct got the better of his desire to climb, and, shouting out to us to stay where we were for five minutes, he ran round to the high-level traverse on the other side of the ghyll, and down the Lord’s Rake to the cavern. George had the tripod screw and could not hand it to his brother; so, asking me to hold him firmly with the rope, he practised throwing stones across the gully to the traverse. Then, tying the screw to a stone, he managed to project this over successfully…

“‘Mr. Jones! I can’t see you, your clothes are so dark.’ I apologised. ‘Will you step out a foot or two from that hole?’ I was in a cheerful mood and ready to oblige a friend, but the platform was scarcely two feet square, and to acquiesce was to step out a few hundred feet into Deep Ghyll. For this I had not made adequate preparation and told him so.”

In 1898, Jones and G. T. Walker broke new ground on the Pinnacle. Contemporary climbing practice favoured ascending chimneys, cracks and gullies, but Jones and Walker went straight up the face of the buttress above Lord’s Rake.

The Lord’s Rake, Scafell. The Pinnacle forms the left hand wall.

In 1903, an attempt to do something similar ended in tragedy for R. W. Broadrick, A. E. W. Garrett, H. L. Jupp, and S. Ridsdale. The men were roped together, so when the leader fell, they all did. At the time, it was the worst climbing accident ever to have occurred in Britain.

The news never reached Jones. He was already dead. He had perished four years earlier, attempting to climb Dent Blanche in the Swiss Alps. A second edition of his book was published posthumously. It contains a poignant memoir from W. M. Crook, who had spoken with Jones just the day before. When Crook had asked him about the ambitious schedule he had set himself, Jones had replied:

“‘You see there are only a few years in which I can do this sort of thing, and I want to get as much into them as possible.’ Alas! Owen Jones had not twenty four hours more; the years were ended.”

At the foot of Lord’s Rake, a humble cross, carved into the rock face, serves as a memorial to Broadrick, Garrett, Jupp and Risdale. It takes me a while to find. It’s deliberately unobtrusive, respectful of the prevailing notion that the mountains should remain unsullied by the mark of man.

In 1730, the political philosopher, Montesquieu, had written, “there is no religion in England.” The Age of Reason had swept godliness aside, at least in intellectual circles, but it had left a spiritual vacuum, which the Romantics filled with the idea of the sublime—the notion that some experiences, and some landscapes, possess such inherent magnificence, such grandeur, such terror even, that they take us utterly beyond ourselves. Scottish glaciologist, James Forbes, wrote of finding the bodies of mountaineers in the Alps:

“The effect on us all was electric… we turned and surveyed, with a stranger sense of sublimity than before, the desolation by which we were surrounded, and became still more sensible of our isolation from human dwellings, human help and human sympathy…We are men, and we stand in the chamber of death”

A skeleton lies at the foot of the rake, not far from the cross. It was once a sheep, but its front legs are missing, giving the strange impression of a velociraptor. Even a dinosaur would be millennia younger than “towering rampart of shadowed crags” that rise all around. The words are Wainwright’s, and he goes on to declare the Scafell crags “the greatest display of natural grandeur in the district”. Today, an early blanket of snow helps illuminate their every nook and cranny. Upper shoulders are bejewelled with glittering crystals of ice, and they conspire to trick the imagination with chameleon forms. The curved ravine of Steep Ghyll creates an elbow in the rock of Pisgah Buttress, and I can see a colossal king of stone, seated on his throne, his face all but hidden by a prodigious beard that flows into his lap. To his right, the Pinnacle stands guard, a might champion, battle-ready in breast plate and helmet, sword held against his chest, while the rounded foot of Shamrock supplies his shield.

The Pinnacle and Pisgah Buttress, Scafell Crag

” data-medium-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?fit=300%2C221″ data-large-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?fit=474%2C349″ loading=”lazy” width=”474″ height=”349″ src=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?resize=474%2C349″ alt=”The Pinnacle and Pisgah Buttress” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?resize=1024%2C755 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?resize=300%2C221 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?resize=768%2C566 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?resize=1536%2C1133 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?resize=2048%2C1510 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?w=948 948w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Scafell-Crag.jpg?w=1422 1422w” sizes=”(max-width: 474px) 100vw, 474px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ /> The Pisgah Buttress and the Pinnacle, Scafell Crag

I detour along a rocky path that hugs the foot of the cliff, rising on a narrow shelf to Mickledore, the ridge that separates Scafell from Scafell Pike. The summit of Scafell Pike is England’s highest, but it takes its name from its neighbour, which from many angles looks the larger and more imposing. The way up the Pike from Mickledore is easy but the summit of Scafell is defended by the sheer wall of Broad Stand. Wainwright marks Broad Stand “out of bounds for walkers”, and I have no intention of risking my neck. I will ascend via Lord’s Rake, but first, I want to study these magnificent rock faces at close quarters. Their ghylls, gullies, arêtes and chimneys bear the names of climbing pioneers who risked death or glory here: Puttrell’s Traverse, Collier’s Climb, Slingsby’s Chimney, Robinson’s Chimney…

Broad Stand over Mickledore

” data-medium-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1-scaled.jpg?fit=300%2C225″ data-large-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1-scaled.jpg?fit=474%2C356″ loading=”lazy” width=”474″ height=”356″ src=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1.jpg?resize=474%2C356″ alt=”Broad Stand over Mickledore” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1-scaled.jpg?resize=1024%2C768 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1-scaled.jpg?resize=300%2C225 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C576 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1152 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1536 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1-scaled.jpg?w=948 948w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Broad-Stand-over-Mickledore-1-scaled.jpg?w=1422 1422w” sizes=”(max-width: 474px) 100vw, 474px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ /> Broad Stand over Mickledore

Mountaineering, climbing, even fell walking feats are often described as conquests, but it’s ludicrous to imagine that we could ever conquer a mountain. The conquest is personal—conquering our own fears and frailties, our own dearth of knowledge or lack of skill. Perhaps the victory is simply the feeling that we have entered the “chamber of death” and survived.

The Lord’s Rake from The Rake’s Progress

I retrace my steps and start up the scree of Lord’s Rake. The Rake is a steep gully that affords walkers a dramatic passage up through the crags. It comprises three ascents and two descents. The first section is the hardest, being particularly steep and loose. While not graded as a scramble, hands are frequently employed. About a third of the way up, there’s a breach in the left-hand wall. A mossy cave stares out, like the green mouth of a giant snake. This is the first pitch of Deep Ghyll. The cave’s roof is a tremendous chockstone, assailable only by climbers. Above and set back some way, I can see the entrance to another cave. This is the second climbers’ pitch, where Jones once spent a cheery Christmas Day. His planned ascent was nearly abandoned when one of his party produced a jar of Carlsbad plums. They tasted so good that no-one wanted to leave the cave. Eventually, the owner seized the jar and swore no-one was to take another mouthful until they had completed their climb.

Deep Ghyll cave

” data-medium-file=”https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1-scaled.jpg?fit=225%2C300″ data-large-file=”https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1-scaled.jpg?fit=474%2C632″ loading=”lazy” width=”474″ height=”632″ src=”https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1.jpg?resize=474%2C632″ alt=”Deep Ghyll cave” srcset=”https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C1024 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1-scaled.jpg?resize=225%2C300 225w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1-scaled.jpg?resize=1152%2C1536 1152w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C2048 1536w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1-scaled.jpg?w=1920 1920w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1-scaled.jpg?w=948 948w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-cave-1-scaled.jpg?w=1422 1422w” sizes=”(max-width: 474px) 100vw, 474px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ /> Deep Ghyll cave, Lord’s Rake Deep Ghyll first pitch

” data-medium-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?fit=225%2C300″ data-large-file=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?fit=474%2C632″ loading=”lazy” width=”474″ height=”632″ src=”https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1.jpg?resize=474%2C632″ alt=”Deep Ghyll first pitch” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C1024 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?resize=225%2C300 225w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?resize=1152%2C1536 1152w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C2048 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?w=1920 1920w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?w=948 948w, https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-first-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?w=1422 1422w” sizes=”(max-width: 474px) 100vw, 474px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ /> Deep Ghyll first pitch
Deep Ghyll Second pitch

” data-medium-file=”https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?fit=225%2C300″ data-large-file=”https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?fit=474%2C632″ loading=”lazy” width=”474″ height=”632″ src=”https://i0.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1.jpg?resize=474%2C632″ alt=”Deep Ghyll Second pitch” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C1024 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?resize=225%2C300 225w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?resize=1152%2C1536 1152w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C2048 1536w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?w=1920 1920w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?w=948 948w, https://i2.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Deep-Ghyll-Second-pitch-1-scaled.jpg?w=1422 1422w” sizes=”(max-width: 474px) 100vw, 474px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ /> Deep Ghyll Second pitch

The top of the first section of the Rake is littered with large boulders—the remains of a chockstone that fell in 2002 and came to rest in a standing position, forming a precarious arch. Mountain Rescue warned walkers against using the Rake for fear it would topple, but after a couple of years, it was assumed stable. It did eventually come crashing down in 2016. Fortunately, no-one was on the Rake at the time, or there might have been cause to carve another cross.

Looking down the Lord’s Rake from the top of the first section

Just shy of the boulders, a clear path climbs out of the rake. This leads up to the West Wall Traverse, a narrow ledge that runs above Deep Ghyll and enters the ravine at its third pitch. In its final section, the ghyll is a grade 1 scramble through some of Lakeland’s most astounding rock scenery. I took this route two weeks ago. Today, I intend to follow Lord’s Rake all the way to the top, but with snow and the sunlight painting such a striking picture, I can’t resist another detour on to the ledge.

The start of the West Wall Traverse

If your heart doesn’t perform a double somersault when you set foot on the West Wall Traverse, you should apply to your doctor for a soul transplant. The Pinnacle and Pisgah tower above you, two imposing towers separated by the Jordan Gap, biblical names that testify to the religious impulse this terrain induces. The Traverse feels like the nave of a colossal temple. From this side, the Pinnacle resembles the furled wing of vast eagle; Pisgah is its breast and its head, encased in a hood, or perhaps a gladiator’s helmet, with a large chiselled eye socket keeping watch. Savage grandeur: imposing, formidable, awe-inspiring, and sublime.

The Pinnacle and Pisgah from the West Wall Traverse

A crack runs up the right hand side of the Pinnacle. This is the route that Jones and the Abrahams took before traversing a thin ridge across the rock face to the subsidiary summit of Low Man. I’ll never know how it feels to perch so precariously, especially in tweeds and hobnail boots! I’m happy simply to know that I’m standing exactly where Ashley did when he photographed them.

Eventually, I walk back down the snowy ledge to Lord’s Rake and clamber gracelessly over the boulders. The next section is a short descent and re-ascent. The path then drops much further to climb again beside another scree slope. At the top, a snowy plateau looks down over Wasdale’s ruddy screes to the long blue ellipse of Wastwater.

Wastwater from the top of the Lord’s Rake

To the north stands Great Gable, a mighty pyramid, free of snow, but swarming with tiny figures. They are a large crowd of people, gathering on Remembrance Sunday to pay their respects, not in a church, but on the summit of mountain. Gable was bought by the FRCC, along with 12 surrounding peaks, and donated to the nation as a memorial to the club members who died in the First World War. Known as the Great Gift, this was the ultimate expression of what James Westaway calls sacralisation of the landscape: mountains liberated from private interests to stand as national monuments to the men who died in the nation’s defence.

Great Gable from the top of the Lord’s Rake Memorial service attendees on top of Great Gable

It was not the only such gesture. in 1919, Lord Leconfield donated the summit of Scafell Pike to the nation, “in perpetual memory of the men of the Lake District who fell for God and King, for freedom, peace and right in the Great War”. And so, the Roof of England herself became a shrine to those sacrificed in her service.

From the saddle below Symonds Knott (the top of the West Wall), I track around to the head of Deep Ghyll. Here Wainwright sketched the Pinnacle and Pisgah, including himself, bottom right, as “the Oracle”. I cross the narrow shoulder on to Pisgah rock, treading carefully—the drop into Deep Ghyll is unforgiving.

Symmonds Knott over Deep Ghyll The Pinnacle and Pisgah from the plateau above Deep Ghyll Great Gable from Pisgah

Pisgah is the Biblical name of the mountain where God showed Moses the Promised Land. The Scafell version is aptly named. But to cross the Jordan Gap and gain the top of the Pinnacle is beyond my skills, so after a brief visit to Scafell’s summit, I descend the scree into the deep bowl of Foxes Tarn. The tarn itself is an enigma. It’s no more than a puddle, but a perpetual stream of water cascades down the rocks of its outlet gully. The gully is the Rake’s counterpart on the Eskdale side of Mickledore. In summer, it’s a simple scramble, but today much of the lower section is iced, so Microspikes pay dividends. Water sparkles, icicles glisten and with the gentle tinkling of the cascades, the deep green moss and crisp white snow, it’s a magical oasis of tranquility.

Foxes Tarn Gully

Ahead are the sun-flecked crags of Scafell Pike, my final destination. It’s a slog back up the loose scree to the crest of Mickledore, but the chiselled charcoal tower of Broad Stand is ample reward. After paying due reverence, I turn and follow cairns over snow covered boulders to England’s highest ground.

Scafell Pike from Foxes Tarn Gully Broad Stand

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A stone tablet, set into the summit platform, tells of Leconfield’s legacy. I’ve heard it lamented that this memorial is too seldom noticed by the crowds that flock here daily. In truth, no-one has ever missed it, for the tablet is not the memorial. The memorial is the mountain itself.

As we approach the final hour of daylight, a golden radiance licks the surrounding fells. All except Scafell that is, which remains black and foreboding, “a spectacle of massive strength and savage wildness”, as Wainwright so perfectly puts it. AW understood the sublime, so I shall leave the final word to him:

“A man may stand on the lofty ridge of Mickledore, or in the green hollow beneath the precipice amidst the littered debris and boulders fallen from it, and witness the sublime architecture of buttresses and pinnacles soaring into the sky, silhouetted against racing clouds or, often, tormented by writhing mists, and, as in a great cathedral, lose all his conceit. It does a man good to realise his own insignificance in the general scheme of things, and that is his experience here.”

” data-medium-file=”https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?fit=300%2C225″ data-large-file=”https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?fit=474%2C356″ loading=”lazy” width=”474″ height=”356″ src=”https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?resize=474%2C356″ alt=”Bow Fell from Scafell Pike” srcset=”https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?resize=1024%2C768 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?resize=300%2C225 300w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?resize=768%2C576 768w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?resize=1536%2C1152 1536w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?resize=2048%2C1536 2048w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?w=948 948w, https://i1.wp.com/www.lakelandwalkingtales.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Bow-Fell-from-Scafell-Pike-1.jpg?w=1422 1422w” sizes=”(max-width: 474px) 100vw, 474px” data-recalc-dims=”1″ /> Bow Fell from Scafell Pike Snow field on Scafell Pike

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Further Reading & Listening

In a fascinating academic article called, Mountains of Memory, Landscapes of Loss, Jonathan Westaway examines the “sacralisation of the landscape” that ultimately led to the Great Gift.

Unbeknown to me at the time, while I was climbing the Lord’s Rake, the brilliant Countrystride team were interviewing Dr Jonathan Westaway on Green Gable, en route to the memorial service on Great Gable. The result is a riveting interview in which Jonathan talks more about the sacralisation of the fells and the memorials of Gable and Scafell. Well worth a listen…

A contemporary account of the disaster on Scafell Crag from the archives of the Yorkshire Ramblers Club

Rock Climbing in the English Lake District (second edition, 1900) , by Owen Glynne Jones was reprinted twice in the 1970’s so second hand editions are relatively easy to pick up. I am not a climber, but you don’t have to be to be enthralled by Jones’s writing and the wonderful photographs by George and Ashley Abraham

Lakeland Walking Tales This Is My Church Scafell & Scafell Pike via Lord’s Rake, the West Wall Traverse and Foxes Tarn Wainwright declared Scafell Crag, “the greatest display of natural