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liquid marijuana cocktail

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How to Make a Liquid Marijuana Cocktail

Whenever I’ve had this drink, everyone around me wants to know what’s in it.

What Is a Liquid Marijuana Cocktail?

Whenever I’ve had this drink, everyone around me wants to know what’s in it. It looks so appealing, and it always strikes their curiosity. Then, once they have a sip, they love it!

The Liquid Marijuana is a delicious fruity cocktail that, contrary to its name, does not actually contain any marijuana. It’s the green color and the optional cannabis-shaped pineapple wedge garnish that gives it its tongue-in-cheek name.

When you order this drink at a restaurant or bar, it’s always hit or miss as to whether the bartender has even heard of it—let alone know how to make it—so it’s best to be prepared with the knowledge of how it’s made.

A Word of Caution

Depending on your personal tolerance level for alcohol, you might want to err on the side of caution if you’re away from home or if you don’t have a reliable means of transportation back to someplace safe. This drink can cause different reactions in people who are more sensitive to alcohol.

I say this from experience. After about two of these, I’m feeling pretty good and probably shouldn’t be allowed to drive. This drink contains a mix of several strong liquors, so please, keep that in mind when consuming it.

Please drink responsibly.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz Malibu or coconut rum
  • 1/2 oz Midori or watermelon liqueur (make sure it’s green)
  • 1/2 oz Blue Curacao liqueur
  • 1/2 oz Captain Morgan or spiced rum
  • 3 oz pineapple juice
  • Splash Sprite or lemon-lime soda
  • Ice
  • Pineapple wedge and/or cherry (optional, for garnish)

Instructions

  1. Pour all ingredients into a shaker, or even directly into drinking glass.
  2. Mix or shake, and serve.
  3. Optional garnishes: pineapple and/or maraschino cherry.

Variations

Some other options could be to use vodka instead of rum or orange juice instead of pineapple. Or if you have a creative mind and a variety of liqueurs, there’s nothing stopping you from creating your own masterpiece! But if you want it to be some derivative of the Liquid Marijuana, you might want to keep it at least green in color.

© 2020 Tawny

Comments

Tawny (author) from Kennesaw, GA on February 05, 2020:

I’m sure if you get creative you could work some in there! Maybe soak some pineapple in oil or something and use it as a garnish 🙂

Kelley Marks from Sacramento, California on February 04, 2020:

It’s a shame not to put some THC in that drink, but I’ll bet a person or two will try! The color certainly matches the name, though. Love to try it some day.

This drink is always a winner with anyone who has tried it and likes fruity drinks. Disclaimer: It does NOT contain any marijuana.

hemp seeds drug testing

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Can hemp seeds make you test positive for marijuana?

DENVER — Forty percent of Americans buy organic foods, and one of the most popular items is hemp seeds. Controversy over whether hemp seeds can have the same effect as marijuana has some worried.

You can find plenty of hemp products at your local health food store. Seeds can be sprinkled on your favorite meal and there’s even a hemp shake these days.

Hemp is popular because it’s a great diet supplement for people allergic to soy, containing about 11 grams of protein in a single tablespoon.

Lani Banner of The Vitamin Cottage explains, “It is a complete protein, contains all of the essential amino acids in the ratio that the human body requires.” But some worry hemp contains THC, found in marijuana which is in the same family of plants.

This year, the military banned soldiers from eating products with hemp seeds. The reasoning was that the seeds might skew a soldier’s drug test. We decided to have the seeds tested at Forensic Laboratories in Aurora.

Our subject was a mother of three who doesn’t want us to use her name, but agreed to take part in our test.

She enjoys the health benefits of hemp, but wants to make sure she’s not making a mistake and says, “For my children, I want to set an example for them that it’s important what you put in your body and drugs are not the way to go.”

After eating a salad with three times the amount of hemp seeds usually found in packaged yogurt, our subject submitted a urine sample to the lab to begin the testing process, which was repeated twice.

She also used a good amount of hemp lotion.

Dr. Laura Bechtel revealed to us that the results were negative for THC. Bechtel says the lab does job drug testing on a routine basis and does not find THC traces in people who eat hemp as a health food but do not use marijuana and adds, “People have to realize it’s going to have to take a large amount of seeds, a bag of seeds or more to test positive.”

Experts say if you want to have confidence in what you’re buying, check the label every time. Since hemp seeds that are hulled lose their THC, make sure to buy seeds that are produced in Canada, where exported hemp products fall under tough standards.

Lani Banner of The Vitamin Cottage says, “You can look at the back of the label for the symbol for the test pledge, this is where the companies pledge that they are testing all of their hemp seed products to ensure that it has undetectable levels of THC.”

The symbol looks like a small circle or tear drop shape that says “test pledge.” Learn more information about the benefits of hemp products here.

DENVER — Forty percent of Americans buy organic foods, and one of the most popular items is hemp seeds. Controversy over whether hemp seeds can have the same effect as marijuana has some worried. You can find plenty of hemp products at your local health food store. Seeds can be sprinkled on your favorite meal and […]

zod strain

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Zod strain

Here you can find all info about ZOD from Moxie 710. If you are searching for information about ZOD from Moxie 710, check out our Basic Infos, Gallery, Strain Reviews, Shop-Finder and Price Comparison, Lineage / Genealogy or User Comments for this cannabis variety here at this page and follow the links to get even more information. If you have any personal experiences with growing or consuming this cannabis variety, please use the upload links to add them to the database!

Basic / Breeders Info

ZOD is a mostly indica variety from Moxie 710 and can be cultivated indoors (where the plants will need a flowering time of ±60 days ) and outdoors . Moxie 710s ZOD is a THC dominant variety and is/was only available as feminized seeds.

Moxie 710s ZOD Description

Zod is a strain that is a mix for everybody. From buds that produce chunks the size of two-litre soda bottles to snow covered cherry-flavoured golf balls, Zod is sure to have something to shake up your taste buds. It’s a strain for advanced growers and pheno-hunters alike. With about six different phenotypes to look for with yields ranging from 400-500 grams per meter squared. Expect sweet to sweet-kushy flavours. Most will show areas of purple, but one or two will stay a brilliant lime green with dazzling orange hairs.

Genetics: Viper City x Kryptonite
Flowering time: 55-60 Days
Type: Inidica Dominant
Grows: Indoor & Outdoor
Yield: High

Where to buy ZOD cannabis seeds?

ZOD from Moxie 710 is available only as feminized seeds. Regular seeds are not available at the moment. In 2 seedbanks, we found 3 offers between EUR 9.48 for 1 feminized seed and EUR 54.00 for 6 feminized seeds. If you are looking to buy ZOD Cannabis Seeds from Moxie 710 somewhere – have a look to our ZOD Price Comparison page with all current offers from all the connected seedbanks and shops – or visit one of the following tested, trustworthy and recommended seed-shops directly to check out their current ZOD offers: Oaseeds and Mary’s Seeds.

ZOD Reviews

We’ve collected strain info from one grower for ZOD.

Known Phenotypes:
More Info:

ZOD Gallery

Here you see the latest ZOD photos, uploaded from our users! Altogether we’ve collected 1 pictures from Moxie 710s ZOD, check out our ZOD gallery to view them all.

ZOD Lineage / Genealogy

  • ZOD »»» Viper City x Kryptonite
  • Viper City
    • »»» Grape Kush x Lemon OG
    • Grape Kush
      • Grape Kush probably
        • »»» Mendo Purps x OG Kush x Grapefruit
        • Mendo Purps
          • USA »»» Mostly Indica
        • OG Kush Probably
          • »»» Chemdawg x Probably
          • Lemon Thai x Hindu Kush, Pakistan
            • Lemon Thai »»» Sativa
            • Hindu Kush, Pakistan »»» Indica
          • Chemdawg
            • Unknown Indica »»» Indica
        • Grapefruit
          • Unknown Hybrid »»» Indica/Sativa Hybrid
    • Lemon OG
      • »»» Lemon OG Kush x Joe’s OG Kush
      • Lemon OG Kush
        • USA Mendocino »»» Indica/Sativa Hybrid
      • Joe’s OG Kush IBL
        • »»» SFV OG x IBL
        • SFV OG x Lemon Pledge
          • SFV OG
            • OG Kush SFV Cut (specified above)
          • Lemon Pledge »»» Unknown Strain
        • SFV OG (specified above)
  • Kryptonite
    • »»» Green Crack x SFV OG Kush Bx2
    • Green Crack
      • »»» Skunk #1 x Unknown Indica
      • Skunk #1
        • Skunk #1
          • »»» Afghanistan x Mexico x Colombia
          • Afghanistan »»» Indica
          • Mexico »»» Sativa
          • Colombia »»» Sativa
      • Unknown Indica »»» Indica
    • SFV OG Kush Bx2
      • »»» SFV OG x SFV OG Kush
      • SFV OG (specified above)
      • SFV OG Kush
        • »»» SFV OG x Afghani #1
        • SFV OG (specified above)
        • Afghani #1
          • »»» Afghanistan x Afghanistan
          • Afghanistan »»» Indica
          • Afghanistan »»» Indica
Map of the ZOD Family Tree

ZOD User Comments

Altogether we’ve collected 2 user comments about Moxie 710s ZOD. Here you find the 2 english user comments:

JHydro – 03.07.2017

So far 2 of 6 are herms for me.

Dabmasterzac – 09.02.2017

Okay so the first zod germination i did was outside in a solo cup. Tried getting a few other strains to also but none of the others did (OUTSIDE).after it sprotted out of the dirt i put in my veg room.1 1000 wat and a veg spectrom light. This stain grows fast. Withen a month the plant is around 2 and a half feet to 3 feet ( didnt take exact measurements. Have her as a mother as of now aroind 5 and a half 5 tall). And by the way im usimg a special blend of dirt, only use water. Clones taken off the mother will get around 5 feet in a 5 weeks. Witch was to long for me actully cuz withen thw first week of budding them they have grown almost a foot. Had to tie all them down towards the middle of the room. The plant has a nice smell to it even when it not budding. Ill be sure to post more after it buds. Also i have all the difftent types. Only have 2 growimg at the moment tho.

Upload your info about this strain here:

Do you know something more about Moxie 710s ZOD? Please help to make this database better and upload/connect your information here!

Pictures

Pictures speak louder than words! Upload your “ZOD” Photos here and help other growers to get a better impression of this variety.

Comparisons

You have grown ZOD together with another variety? Please fill out our Strain VS. Strain direct comparisation form!

User Reviews

Our strain reviews are multilingual, searchable and can be very detailed – including data about the grow, aroma, effects and taste! Please upload your ZOD Review here to help the other seedfinder users!

Medical Values

You have experience with the medical qualities of ZOD? Sharing your information here maybe can help other people!

Threads

You’ve stumbled upon a ZOD related thread into a forum or growers community? Connect it here and enable othe users to find this information fast and easy!

Videos

You found a related video with additional information or grow-infos about ZOD on YouTube? Please connect it here to the strain info page!

Zod strain Here you can find all info about ZOD from Moxie 710 . If you are searching for information about ZOD from Moxie 710, check out our Basic Infos, Gallery, Strain Reviews, Shop-Finder

indoor mite killer

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How To Get Rid Of Spider Mites On Houseplants, For Good!

Spider mites look like tiny white spiders that create webs on houseplants, and they are extremely destructive pests. It can be difficult, but don’t worry, you can get rid of spider mites on indoor plants, and eliminate them FOR GOOD!

There’s nothing more frustrating than finding a spider mite infestation on one of your beloved indoor plants.

They are one of the most destructive plant pests there is, so it’s super important to get rid of them as quickly as possible.

But the good news is that, when it comes to getting rid of bugs on houseplants, these guys are pretty easy to control.

Simply follow the natural spider mite treatment methods below, and you’ll be able to eradicate this annoying pest, for good!

Here’s what you’ll find in this guide for getting rid of spider mites on houseplants…

Table of Contents

What Are Spider Mites?

Spider mites are tiny bugs that can attack many different types of plants, and can be a major problem on indoor plants. Often times they look like tiny white spiders on plants, but can also appear to be tan, red or black.

They create telltale spider webs on houseplants, which they use for protection and to crawl around on. Since they are so small, spider mites aren’t noticeable until their population explodes.

You’ll likely notice the webbing on plants first, and then see the mites when you take a closer look. It will look like there are tiny spiders crawling all over your plant.

Spider mites thrive in warm, dry conditions and can become a major problem during the winter, when your dry house becomes the perfect breeding ground for them.

If you see small bugs crawling around in your houseplant soil rather than on the leaves, then you might have fungus gnats instead of spider mites. Here’s how to get rid of fungus gnats in houseplants soil.

Otherwise, if the bugs are crawling around on the plant leaves, and you see spider webs on houseplants, then keep reading…

Spider mites look like tiny white spiders on plants

Indoor Plant Mites Identification

Spider mites are easy to identify, and finding spider webs on plants is a dead giveaway.

They tend to start their webs on the underside of leaves and at the leaf joints, so that’s why they usually go unnoticed for so long.

They are sneaky little suckers. Like I mentioned above, they are difficult to see, and usually by the time you discover them on a houseplant, it’s already been heavily damaged.

You might notice the whites spider web on plants first, or the plant leaves may just look dusty. From a distance, the houseplant might look like it isn’t getting enough water and the leaves are drying out.

If you notice any of these, take a closer look. Hold the plant up to the light and look under the leaves. It may take a minute, but you should be able to see the tiny mites moving around on the fine webbing.

Spider Mites Webbing and Bugs

Spider Mite Life Cycle

Spider mites multiply very quickly and, in the right conditions, can double their population every couple of weeks.

Spider mites become fully grown about a week after they hatch. It only takes a few weeks for an adult female to lay hundreds of eggs, and for those eggs to start to hatch.

The end result is in an exponential growth in their population over a very short amount of time.

Since the eggs are invisible to the naked eye, and the adults are minuscule, most people don’t discover spider mites on their houseplants until after the population has exploded.

Webs and spider mites on houseplants

Where Do Spider Mites Come From

The tricky part about mites is that they can come from anywhere, and you’ll probably never know where they came from in the first place.

But, here are several common places where spider mites can come from…

  • Buying a new plant that has mites
  • Repotting plants with unsterile potting soil
  • Moving your plants outside for the summer
  • Flowers and vegetables brought in from your yard and garden
  • Since they’re so small, they could easily come in through the screens of open doors and windows

Spider Mite Damage On Houseplants

Spider mites are one of the most destructive houseplant pests. They can heavily damage or even kill a houseplant in a very short period of time.

They suck the sap out of the leaves making them look discolored, speckled, curled under, dried or shriveled up.

The infested leaves will shrivel up and die, and usually fall from the plant, which will ultimately kill the houseplant.

Spider mites can kill indoor plants pretty quickly, so it’s important to take fast action to get rid of them as fast as possible.

Spider webs on plants is a sign of spider mites

How To Get Rid Of Spider Mites On Houseplants

Once you discover the infestation, it’s super important to begin spider mite treatment immediately, before they spread to the rest of your collection.

The first thing you should do is to quarantine the infested plant and inspect all surrounding houseplants for mites. You want to contain the problem immediately.

There are chemical pesticides that are specifically designed for mites. But spider mites may develop resistance to them in a short time.

So, I don’t recommend them (plus these types of chemicals are toxic to humans and pets, so I wouldn’t recommend using them anyway).

It’s best to use safer pest control methods and products to get rid of mites on houseplants. You can learn more about natural pest control for your houseplants here.

Below you’ll find the best methods that will work for treating a spider mite infestation on your houseplants…

Spider mites on indoor plants

Spider Mite Treatment For Indoor Plants

The best way to avoid heavy spider mite damage to your houseplants is to start treating the plant as soon as you discover the pests.

As soon as I notice the spider webs on any of my plants, I bring the plant to the sink or bathtub.

Then I wash the leaves with my homemade insecticide soap, and rinse the leaves well to wash away as many of the dead mites as I can.

After cleaning the leaves, I use a variety of home remedies for spider mites, and all of them are very effective for controlling plant mites indoors.

Keep in mind that pesticide sprays, even organic ones, can damage sensitive plants, so it’s best to test it on a few leaves before spraying the entire plant.

Also, be sure to focus your sprays on the undersides of the leaves, this is where spider mites lay their eggs.

Spider Mite Insecticide Soap

To kill mites on plants, use an organic insecticidal soap, or mix a solution of my homemade spider mite insecticide soap (recipe below).

My homemade spider mite insecticide soap recipe:

  • 1 tsp of mild liquid soap
  • 1 liter tepid water

Mix the ingredients in a spray bottle and then spray directly the leaves of your houseplant. This homemade spider mite killer is great for getting rid of the bugs right away.

Homemade spider mite insecticide spray

Use Neem Oil For Spider Mites

Neem oil is very effective to control spider mite infestations long term, and also works for pest prevention as well.

I like to buy neem oil concentrate, and make my own spray for mites on plants using the recipe below.

While neem oil does kill bugs, it can take some time to get rid of spider mites, so I use it after washing the leaves and spraying the plant with insecticidal soap first.

A pre-mixed horticultural oil or hot pepper wax spray also work very well for controlling spider mites on houseplants by repelling them.

My homemade neem oil spider mites spray recipe:

  • 1 1/2 tsp of pure neem oil concentrate
  • 1 tsp of mild liquid soap
  • 1 liter of tepid water

Use neem oil for controlling spider mites indoors

Keep Humidity Levels High

Since spider mites thrive in dry conditions, keeping the air around your plants humid is one of the best spider mite pest prevention methods. Ensuring your plants are properly watered is important to keep them well hydrated.

Misting houseplants regularly helps to prevent spider mites. You could also try leaving a container of water near the plant, or use a humidifier to help keep the humidity up around your plants.

If it’s really dry in your house, then I recommend getting an inexpensive indoor humidity monitor so you can be sure the air around your houseplants isn’t too dry.

Getting rid of mites on plants by misting them

In addition to washing and spraying the plant, you can trim off heavily infested leaves and throw them into the garbage to get rid of even more of the spider mites and eggs.

Be sure to throw the infested leaves into the garbage outside of your house! Don’t prune all of the leaves from your plant though.

How To Prevent Spider Mites From Ever Coming Back

Keeping your plants healthy, and maintaining adequate soil moisture are two of the best ways to prevent spider mites on indoor plants.

A soil moisture gauge is a great tool to use to figure out how moist the soil is, and ensure you’re watering your plants properly.

Here are a few other tips for getting rid of spider mites for good…

  • Mist sensitive houseplants regularly, and keep the humidity level high around the plant
  • Use neem oil as a preventative spray or as a leaf polish to keep your plants leaves clean
  • If you move your plants outdoors for the summer, be sure to debug all of your houseplants before bringing them back indoors

They key to getting rid of spider mites for good is good houseplant care habits, and keeping your houseplants healthy. Healthy houseplants are the best way to prevent recurring problems with spider mites and other houseplant pests. Also make sure you check your houseplants on a regular basis for any signs of problems.

If you’re sick of battling bugs on houseplants, then my Houseplant Pest Control eBook is for you! This eBook is jam-packed with information about how to get rid of bugs on indoor plants, using organic pest control methods. It shows you how to identify common pests, and how to prevent recurring infestations so you can debug your houseplants for good. Download your copy today!

Recommended Products
More About Houseplant Pest Control
  • All Natural Pest Control Supplies
  • How To Use Neem Oil Insecticide On Plants
  • Where Do Houseplant Pests Come From?
  • How To Get Rid Of Whiteflies On Indoor Plants, For Good!

Share your tips for how to get rid of spider mites indoors in the comments below.

About Amy Andrychowicz

I live and garden in Minneapolis, MN (zone 4b). My green thumb comes from my parents, and I’ve been gardening most of my life. I’m a passionate gardener who loves growing everything from vegetables, herbs, and flowers to succulents, tropicals, and houseplants – you name, I’ve grown it! Read More.

Comments

Darlene Borcherding says

We have recently brought our huge Boston ferns back inside for the winter. Are they likely to get red spider mites from our forced air heat registers? One of them is about 4 ft. away from one. We’ll place bowls of water near them, of course. Should we spray them with neem oil altho we don’t see any bugs yet? Thank you so much!

Amy Andrychowicz says

If they have had problems with spider mites in the past, then I would spray them regularly as a preventive treatment. Otherwise, I would just keep a close eye on them to watch for bugs, and treat them if any show up.

Brandi Washington says

Great article. Thank you so much for this. Would it be a good idea to leave a jar of water near the plant for the entire winter?

Amy Andrychowicz says

You sure could give it a try, it will help to add a bit more humidity in the air to keep the spider mites at bay. But if that’s not enough, then misting or running a humidifier might work better for you.

Thank you so much for this page, i found my Areca palm infested with webs sooooo gross. I was so worried I bathed my palm twice with the soap and water mixture. Literally wiped every leaf twice over.

I ordered neem oil which is harder to find than thought. SO just to be clear soapy water spray is good for right now while the mites may still be around, so continue that for how long? and then add neem oil solution once every few weeks? Sorry if this was already asked. Thank you in advanced.

Amy Andrychowicz says

You’re welcome. Sorry to hear your plant is infested with spider mites! That is never fun. You can stop using the insecticidal spray once you start using neem oil. Yes, then spray the neem oil every few weeks. Here’s an article that talks about exactly how to use it… How To Use Neem Oil Insecticide On Houseplants. Good luck!

Vallye Chandler says

I have spider mites on my tomato plants. After I wash the plants well with the soap and water is it safe to use the need oil on the tomato plants, or just continue with the soap and water?

Amy Andrychowicz says

Bummer to hear your plant has spider mites! You can safely use neem oil on the leaves of your tomato plants, no problem. Just be sure to test it on a few leaves first to make sure it doesn’t cause damage. And don’t spray while it’s sunny outside, either do it in the early morning or evening, or on a cloudy day.

Anam tahir says

Hi there. I’ve just discovered spider mites on my monstera and hoping to use your soap method. How often should i spray the plant? Will the soap leave a residue I need to wipe off?

Amy Andrychowicz says

Oh no, sorry to hear your plant has spider mites! Wash the leaves with the mild liquid soap as I mentioned above first, then rinse them well. That will get rid of most of the adults and eggs. Then you can spray the plant once every few days until all signs of the mites are gone. Good luck!

I have spider mites on my meyer lemon tree. Is neem oil safe ?

Amy Andrychowicz says

Yes, neem oil is safe to use on your meyer lemon to help get rid fo the spider mites. But just be sure to test it on a few leaves before treating the whole plant to make sure it doesn’t damage them.

Lita Collazzo says

my potted basil plants were beautiful and then suddenly they were drained shriveling and drooping. I noticed this faint web with tiny little white.specs So I am guessing it is spider mites. I am wondering if after I wash the basil plants with the gentle soap solution and treated with oil, will the basil still be edible?

Amy Andrychowicz says

Yes, it sounds like spider mites to me. For herb plants, I would recommend misting them with water, and washing the leaves with the water/soap mix using an organic liquid soap. Personally, I wouldn’t use neem oil on edible leaves.

Alana Kuhnert says

So I just discovered spider mites on a plant. I sprayed them off with sink hose and then just did the soap and water spray. I ordered neem oil and will be here in a couple days. How often should I spray the soap mixture and the neem oil ? And then for preventative purpose…how often would I spray the neem oil ? Thank you

Amy Andrychowicz says

Oh, bummer to hear your plant has spider mites! Neem oil has a residual effect, so you only need to spray the plant every few weeks. Here’s more info about how to use it… How To Use Neem Oil On Plants.

Maria Montrond says

Hi I have an indoor plant infested with spider web.i don’t have neem oil, is there any other oil to substitute for neem?

Amy Andrychowicz says

Oh bummer, sorry to hear that you plant is infested with spider mites. Simply keeping the humidity high is usually enough to get rid of them. But, you could also try horticultural oil, or regularly washing the laves with insecticidal soap as alternatives to neem oil.

Kathy Stanford says

Hi, I don’t have any Neem oil but do have powdered sulfur. I just sprayed a solution of 1/2 t. sulfur and 1t. castile soap in 1 L of water on my plant. Have you ever done this? Or has anyone else? It’s an Elephant Ear and I’ve moved it away from my other plants. I really don’t want them on my orchids!

Amy Andrychowicz says

No, I have never tried using powdered sulfur, and I’ve never heard of using it for killing spider mites either. So I can’t speak to it. Good luck, I hope it works for you! рџ™‚

Do we leave the unscented Castile soap, neem oil & tepid water mixture spray on the plant? Are we supposed to pour it on the soil too?

Amy Andrychowicz says

Yes, you can leave the neem oil/soap solution on the plant. You don’t need to pour it into the soil unless you see bugs in there. Spider mites live and bred on the leaves, so you only need to worry about spraying the foliage to get rid of them.

Hi..my okra and bean plants are totally infested with spider mite..i am spraying with a soap solution every day but not much result..I’ll try ur tips and hope for the best

Amy Andrychowicz says

Oh no, sorry to hear your plants have spider mites! You could also try the neem oil solution I mentioned above to see if that takes care of them. Good luck!

Spider mites are one of the most destructive houseplant pests and they multiply quickly. But spider mites are fairly easy to prevent and control.

hempcrete disadvantages

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Pros and cons of Hempcrete

Barbour Product Search
Jul 12, 2019 · 3 min read

What is Hempcrete?

Hempcrete is a bio-composite material that contains a mixtures of hemp, hurds and lime. Like other plant products, hemp absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as it grows, retaining the carbon and releasing the oxygen. Hemp structures date back to roman times and have a lower carbon footprint than many materials. Slowly but surely it is becoming a building material of choice for many who want a sustainable and affordable type of building material. Pretty cool if you ask me!

Its use in con s truction is a small but growing output from hemp farming in the UK, it’s mainly used to provide fibres for quilt insulation. However, Hempcrete can also be used to build houses, with the use of hemp blocks. Hemp blocks ensure humidity regulation, acoustic insulation, as well as protection and fire resistance.

It’s ten times stronger than concrete and one sixth of the weight! With all these factors considered, we’ve decided to delve deeper into the revelation of Hempcrete and came up with some advantages and disadvantages of the material.

Pros
• Non-toxic building material — Hempcrete is generally quite a benign material, fewer pesticides and herbicides are used for farming creating less environmental damage due to the use of toxins on the fields.
• Hempcrete stores heat in the thermal mass of its wall which is then released slowly as the building cools down. This means when you open a window all your heat isn’t going to flow straight out.
• Hemp is the only building material that can remove carbon from the air. Other methods of insulation such as fiberglass have a significant carbon footprint.
• It’s resistant against mold as it’s moisture absorbent. One square meter of hemp wall can absorb up to 14 litres of water which can be released into the ground or recycled.

Cons
• The crop requires liberal use of fertilizer, which can have a negative impact on our ecosystem.
• There is a somewhat lack of builders/architects who are familiar with the product.
• The up-front costs in using Hempcrete can add 8%-12% to the overall price of a home.
• Hemp is not always as readily available as traditionally building materials like concrete.

Since the 1950s the UK construction industry have used synthetic, processed, chemical based materials. This of course has resulted in some homes being prone to damp, and containing harmful levels of toxic chemicals.

Unlike concrete, Hempcrete blocks are fairly lightweight which can dramatically reduce the energy used to transport the blocks. It acts as an insulator and moisture regulator whilst lacking the brittleness of concrete meaning no expansion joints are required. But it’s also very important to consider that concrete is extremely low maintenance and needs fewer repairs, making it a solid investment.

Evidently from a green sustainable point of view, Hempcrete is your winner! But which form of building material do you prefer and why? Is Hempcrete the way forward?

Hempcrete is a bio-composite material that contains a mixtures of hemp, hurds and lime. Like other plant products, hemp absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as it grows, retaining the carbon…

strawberry kush thc level

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Strawberry Kush Strain: A Strong, Sweet Tasting Hybrid

The Strawberry Kush strain is a slightly sweet hybrid that can be found in a throughout North America. The name is relatively common, but it is most often used in reference to a cross between the Strawberry Cough and OG Kush strains.

Strawberry Kush Strain: Strawberry Cough X OG Kush

I came across this batch of the Strawberry Kush strain on my latest trip to HTC in Van Nuys, CA. I’d never come across this strain before, but the sweet strawberry aroma drew me in right away.

Some quick research told me that the Strawberry Kush moniker typically refers to a clone-only, Indica-dominant hybrid that is known for its sweet taste and soothing effects. Of course it’s entirely possible that a slightly different cross could have received the same name over the years.

That being said, I wasn’t entirely sure of what to expect this time around. I had only my sense of smell and the word of the budtender, who informed me that this batch of Strawberry Kush was in fact an Indica-dominant hybrid.

How Might The Strawberry Kush Strain Affect Me?

This batch of the Strawberry Kush strain had a similar sweet, floral aroma that I’ve come to know and love from the Strawberry Cough strain. That being said, this light berry scent was accompanied by deeper hashy undertones.

“Medicating with this strain was a great way to relieve minor pains in my body towards the tail end of the day.”

As is often the case when smoking or vaporizing cannabis, the effects of the Strawberry Kush strain started to present themselves almost instantly. I began to notice a mellow body buzz creep in after about 5 minutes.

Medicating with this strain was a great way to relieve minor pains in my body towards the tail end of the day. I found it to be an outstanding source of stress relief also.

Overall, I would consider the Strawberry Kush strain to be a good introductory strain for new medical marijuana patients. The slight strawberry flavor is a treat for the palette, and its effects could benefit those suffering from neuropathic pain, chronic pain, depression, anxiety, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and more.

FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION (FDA) DISCLAIMER – These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Strawberry Kush Strain: Strawberry Cough X OG Kush

maui kush strain

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Maui Kush

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About this product

This strain is sure to have you feeling up and active after use due to its sativa-dominant genetics. Maui Kush is recommended for anyone dealing with depression, chronic fatigue, general pain, or PTSD. Flavor Profile: Citrus, Pineapple, Tropical, Spicy. Potency may vary per batch. Batch-specific lab results are available in-store.

About this brand
Pono Life Maui
1 customer review

on October 11th, 2019

Smell and taste really sticks to its kush roots. active and creative high. Great for staring the day

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Maui Kush by Pono Life Maui

cannabis adrenal fatigue

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The Endocannabinoid system and stress response (implication in fatigue and burn-out)

By Tanja Bagar

Dr. Tanja Bagar is a microbiologist with a PhD in Biomedicine. She has gained extensive research experience in biotechnology, molecular biology and cell signaling in laboratories in Slovenia, Germany and the UK. Her focus has mainly been on the endocannabinoid system and active substances from cannabis/hemp. Her work led to the formation of the International Institute for Cannabinoids (ICANNA), where she is the CEO and chairman of the Expert Council. She is also the deputy director and head of R&D in an environmental company. She is active in the academic sphere as well. She lectures on microbiology and is the dean of the master’s program of Ecoremediations at the Faculty Alma Mater Europaea.

The endocannabinoid system (ECS)

The more the endocannabinoid system is studied to more we are fascinated with its vital function in health and disease. At the basis the endocannabinoid system is a signalling system, enabling the cells of our body to communicate. Communication between cells, tissues and systems is vital for all multicellular organisms and the more complex and evolved organisms are the higher is the importance of cellular communications. The basic setup needed for cellular communication or signalling is similar as in all communications. We need to know what message we want to send (a signalling molecule) and to who we want to send it to (who has the right receptors or antennas). Cells typically communicate using chemical signals. These are different types of molecules (cannabinoids are just one of many) produced by a sending cell and released into the extracellular space. There, they can float – like messages in a bottle – over to neighbouring cells or into circulation.

Figure 1: schematic representation of cell signalling (source: https://www.khanacademy.org)

Not all cells can “hear” a particular message. In order to detect a signal a cell must have the right receptor for that signal. When a signalling molecule binds to its receptor a shift takes place triggering a change inside of the cell. Signalling molecules are often called ligands, a general term for molecules that bind specifically to other molecules (such as receptors). A signalling molecule and receptor recognize each other based on a unique 3D molecular structure. In essence a receptor will bind a molecule if its structure fits the receptors binding site in a very similar way as a key fits a keyhole. If it’s a match the doors will open and if not, nothing will happen. If a signalling molecule and a receptor are a match, a cascade of downstream reactions will take place, ultimately, leading to a change in the cell, such as alteration in the expression of a gene or even the induction of a new process, such as cell division, apoptosis. Such communication not only enables the cells to respond to changes in the extracellular environment, adapt to these changes and thrive but also exchange signals between cells, tissues, organs, and whole body. These basic principles of intracellular communication are important since they are also fundamental in understanding the endocannabinoid system.

Figure 2: schematic representation of signal transduction (https://www.khanacademy.org)

The role of the endocannabinoid system is very complex. It affects the majority of the systems in our bodies and the cannabinoid receptors are expressed (in different density) on majority of cell types. So describing what exactly it does, is not an easy task, as it regulates the biochemistry of vast majority of estimated 37 trillion cells in our body. Research has shown that the endocannabinoid system functions as an SOS mechanism that is activated whenever our bodies are out of balance for whatever reason. So for example it is activated when we suffer from a physical injury, when we encounter pathologic microbes and also when we feel emotional pain or are under stress.

We now understand the ECS to serves as a general protective mechanism, starting at the cellular level, proceeding to the tissues, organs, body and our general well-being. The ECS is turned on, when the cellular homeostasis is out of balance. It is like the first line of defence to go off, activating all other mechanisms needed to return to homeostasis as soon as possible.

Figure 3: Representation of homeostatic mechanism and the role of cannabinoids (source: Institute ICANNA)

What is stress and how much is too much?

Life in today’s modern society is giving many challenges to our endocannabinoid system and this can lead to exhaustion of the supply of endocannabinoids and other systems. If we take a look at one ordinary day, getting up, getting ourselves and kids ready for work and school, all in a hurry, being in traffic, responsible and stressful jobs, challenging relationships, toxic environment, contaminated food, water and air. it is obvious that in one ordinary day our ECS is facing more challenges than it would in a month or longer some 100 years ago. If our endocannabinoid system is constantly challenged over a longer period of time, this vital SOS mechanism can start to dysfunction. It can dysfunction either by not producing endocannabinoids when we need then, or producing endocannabinoids when we do not need them. This is usually one of the first steps in the development of chronic disease, the first domino to fall in a complex falling domino chain, leading to symptoms and disease. The majority of experts agree that many if not all chronic medical conditions carry an element of stress in their development, and stress is actually considered to be the epidemic of the 21st century.

The fight/flight response has always been a part of our physiology and has served human kind very well most of the time. in keeping us safe and enabling us to access energy when we needed to fight or escape a dangerous situation. It also serves as a protective SOS mechanism in many aspects similar to the ECS.

When our mind perceives a situation as stressful it communicates this stress to our pituitary gland, which then releases hormones to the adrenal glands, which in turn releases more hormones to communicate with other cells and organs within the body. This fight or flight response activates the sympathetic nervous system, inhibits the parasympathetic nervous system, and mobilizes the necessary energies to overcome these stressors. This is known as the HPA (hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal) axis. In case of perceived stress, the adrenal gland will produce cortisol (among other things), known as the stress hormone. Increased production of cortisol results in the increased availability of glucose, as it is an energy mobilization hormone, in order to facilitate fighting or fleeing, but cortisol also suppresses the highly demanding metabolic processes of the immune system, resulting in further availability of glucose.

Figure 5: The HPA axis (source: Institute Icanna)

Our body also reacts with a flight/fight response to everyday situation and this continuous or repetitive exposure to stress is not something our bodies cope well with. We see a staggering increase in chronic fatigue syndrome, insomnia and burnout, to name only a few that have been connected with prolonged exposure to unresolved stress.

Are we coping?

In a healthy body the stress-response system is self-limiting but often we do not notice the warning signals that we are under chronic stress. The signs may range from the tiredness you feel for a few days after recovering from an illness to debilitating fatigue that interferes with life and doesn’t go away with rest, to recurring infections, to headaches and digestion issues.

What does the ECS have to do with it (HPA – ECS crosstalk)?

The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (HPA axis or HTPA axis) is in fact a very complex set of direct influences and feedback interactions among the three components: the hypothalamus, the pituitary and the adrenal glands. Even the adrenal gland themselves are more then just cortisol producers: they produce over 50 hormones (adrenaline, aldosterone, DHEA, testosterone, progesterone and other). The ECS is very closely involved with our stress responses in many aspects, from the perception of a situation, to biochemical reactions and all the way to regulation of our responses and behaviours in stressful situations. The ECS is in fact involved in the perception of stress, the production of neurotransmitters, the production of hormones of the HPA axis and production of cortisol, the functions of the feedback loops, in practically all aspects of stress responses.

From what we understand so far, the ECS is a vital and integral part of perception of stress, in a sense an interface between stimulus input and responses at the synaptic and behavioural levels. The ECS helps us in defining the importance of the situation, determining how big of a treat it is and to tune the right behavioural responses, which are essential for the organism’s long-term viability, homeostasis and stress resilience.

Figure 6: The brain regions with high cannabinoid receptor density (source: http://www.ipharmatrials.com/cannabidiol-menstrual-cycle/)

When we look at the brain regions involved in stress processing, we see that these regions also have a high density of cannabinoid receptors. We know that besides the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, also the amygdala, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus respond to stress and influence our reactions and behaviour during stress. All these regions also have high density of cannabinoid receptors. So already anatomically we see a good overlap of the two systems. Since the brain regions involved in stress processing are also well equipped with the machinery of the ECS, and we know that cannabinoids modulate synaptic transmission, it is evident that the neuronal reactions that follow exposure to stress can be modulated by adequate ECS reactions. At the neuronal synapses cannabinoids function as retrograde messengers, binding to presynaptic receptors which in turn mediate the suppression of neurotransmitter release, leading to either transient short-term or long-term reduction of synaptic transmission. In a way this means the cannabinoids turn down the volume of the noise in our brain (reduce the amount of messages that travel from one neuron to the other). We all know from our own experience that when we have too much stress factors during the day and we are not coping well, we have this feeling of noise in our brain that we often cannot turn down when its time to rest in the evening.

Many elements of the ECS are involved in stress responses, from the receptors, to endocannabinoids, to their precursors and involved enzymes. So we can look at the ECS as a modulator between the outside and inside world. It acts via many different mechanisms, resulting in either enhancement or suppression of the neurons in the brain regions involved in anxiety, fear and stress. Essentially ECS functions as a brake mechanism used to fine-our reactions. The ECS is mostly silent and turns on the brake when there is too much activity.

So how can this knowledge help us deal with stress?

When we notice that our body is not coping with the challenges its time for action.

The first step is to feed the ECS and see if this will do the job. The foods we choose to eat, the supplements we take, and the variety of meals and drinks consumed over time have an effect on the level endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors that the human body can produce. The life style choices can care and feed the ECS or disrupt is. We know that omega 3 fatty acids are precursors for the production of endocannabinoids, so a steady supply of omega 3 is vital of a functioning ECS. When our bodies need to produce endocannabinoids and do not have the necessary building blocks, regardless of how many stimuli there are, our cells cannot produce endocannabinoids. So in essence, the SOS system is turned off.

As Aristotle said, health comes from the gut, and this is true also for the ECS. Our microbiome is in communication and interaction with the ECS and signalling is happening in both directions. A healthy microbiome is critical for a well-functioning ECS in many ways. One is that many of the endocananabinoids are in fact produced in the gut, the other is the brain-gut connection, where many of the neuronal activities are effected by messenger molecules sent by the beneficial or non-beneficial microbes in our gut.

So all in all, it is vital that we have a healthy, beneficial microbial population in our gut and elsewhere in our bodies, for our ECS to function properly. Some foods such as extra virgin olive oil contain phenolic compounds and other bioactive compounds which may encourage enhanced expression of cannabinoid receptors. So diverse plant based food is a good step in caring for the ECS.

Phytocannabinoids

If making changes in food choices and life style does not help adequately its time to consider supplementation with phytocannabinoids. Cannabidiol or CBD is the phytocannabinoid that has been best studied in stress prevention and management. Many research articles have studied the effect of CBD on anxiety, depression, stress and other mood disorders. The common denominator of the studies is that CBD offers relief from these symptoms, employing many different mechanisms. To underline the data from research labs, results from users of CBD worldwide is are showing very similar results.

CBD can be used as a preventive measure as it functions as a guardian molecule, it shields the cells from the effects of stress. It regulates and fine tunes the HPA axis, helping to maintain the proper functioning of our biochemistry even in persistent or unpredicted stress situations. It was shown that CBD offer protection to the adrenal glands, thyroid and the brain during periods of unpredicted stress, something we can all relate to.

On the other hand, if we are already suffering from a wide range of symptoms related to stress, like fatigue, sleep disorders, immune issues, digestion problems or other symptoms, CBD may also offer relief. CBD can, to some extent, do what our endocannabinoids should be doing. It regulates how much cortisol and neurotransmitters we produce and can give us the needed distance from stressful situation. Using CBD as a part of recovering strategy from burn out and fatigue has proven very successful. It helps with neurogenesis in brain regions damaged from prolonged/unpredicted stress, offers cardiovascular protection and modulation of the entire HPA axis. The body can regenerate, when we can turn down to volume of the surrounding world, rest, digest and restore balance. And cannabinoids can aid significantly in this pursuit.

Dr. Mecoulam’s words: “the plant cannabinoids are a neglected pharmacological treasure trove” prove to be very adequate also when addressing stress, the epidemic of the 21st century.

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) The more the endocannabinoid system is studied to more we are fascinated with its vital function in health and disease. At the basis the endocannabinoid system is a signalling system, enabling the cells of our body to communicate. Communication between cells, tissues and systems is vital for all multicellular organisms and the more complex and

BUYCANNABISSEEDS.ORG liquid marijuana cocktail Post author By Admin Post date How to Make a Liquid Marijuana Cocktail Whenever I’ve had this drink, everyone around me

The Sims 4: Seasons – Gardening “How To” Guide

The lowdown on planting seeds, better quality produce and creating new species in the latest Sims expansion

Since its debut on The Sims 2 way back in 2007, the Seasons expansion pack has rapidly grown to be one of the most popular add-ons for the life sim series. With added weather, seasonal activities and more outdoor fun, Seasons has always helped make the whole Sims experience feel a lot more life-like – and a lot more fun. Though it may have been a long time coming, The Sims 4: Seasons has finally launched for The Sims 4, bringing with it a whole host of new seasonal features – and a major overhaul of the game’s gardening system, which is what we’re going to take a look at today. So, chuck on some overalls, roll up your sleeves, and get stuck into creating your perfect virtual garden, Sims-style!

Play quizzes, win prizes! Test your knowledge with our quizzes, and you could win £/$/€ 20 of PSN/XBL/eShop/Steam credit!

New Skills: Gardening and Flower Arranging

The Sims 4: Seasons expansion pack adds two new skills for your Sims to master, Gardening and Flower Arranging – both of which come into play in the expansion’s two new careers, Botanist and Floral Designer. As is often the case, you can raise both of these skills by reading books, practising the skill in question or by researching the skill on the computer. For Flower Arranging, though, you’ll need to pick up a particular item in order to hone your skills – the ‘Violets are Blue Flower Arranging Table‘, found in the Study > Hobbies and Skills menu in buy mode.

Mastering the new Flower Arranging skill requires a specific bit of kit.

As you work your way through the Gardening skill tree, aside from becoming faster and more efficient at weeding/watering/fertilising, you’ll also unlock the ability to buy a wider variety of seeds to supplement your new-found garden. When you hit level 5, you’ll also gain the ability to take cuttings, and graft new species onto existing plants, opening up some much more creative and experimental gardening possibilities in the process.

The Flower Arranging skill, meanwhile, is much more straightforward – as you level up, you basically just unlock new arrangements that make use of new flowers and new scents. The higher your skill gets, the better quality the resulting arrangements are, and therefore the more they’ll sell for.

How do you plant seeds in The Sims 4: Seasons?

While the upgraded gardening system may be one of the biggest draws of the Seasons expansion pack, it’s actually also one of the least intuitive, weirdly enough. Here’s how to get started with your gardens in The Sims 4: Seasons:

  • 1) Buy a ‘Garden Pot‘ or ‘Garden Planter Box‘ from Outdoors > Outdoor Activities in the build menu. Pots can only hold one plant, whereas planter boxes have space for either four individual plants, or one tree in the centre. Technically, they’re not essential buying for your garden, as you can plant directly onto the grass on your lot too – but these pots give you the ability to grow things indoors too. Simply plonk them down on your lot, wherever you want to have your garden, making sure to leave a decent border between the pots and other furniture/buildings, as your Sim needs full access to be able to garden in them.
  • 2) Next, you need to buy some seeds. There’s a few different ways of doing this, although the easiest is to go is via the Build Mode (Outdoors > Outdoor Activities) – simply pick the ‘Starter Flowers/Fruits/Herbs/Vegetables‘ seed packs ($35 a pop), and place them on a spare space on your lot. You can also click on your Garden Pot/Garden Planter Box items and choose the ‘Purchase Seeds‘ option, which will bring up a dialogue box with the same selection of items in.

As your Sim’s Gardening skill increases, you’ll be able to buy new, fancier packets of seeds with new crops to grow.

  • 3) Click on the ‘Starter Flowers/Fruits/Herbs/Vegetables‘ packet you’ve just placed, and then choose ‘Open Seed Packet‘ from the menu. The packet will then fade away, leaving nothing in its place – but don’t worry, they haven’t disappeared! Instead, you’ll find the pack’s contents in your Sims’ inventory. Note that the contents of each seed packet is random, so you may have to buy a few packs to get the particular plant you’re looking for.
  • 4) For some reason, instead of just giving you bog standard seeds in your seed packets, The Sims 4: Seasons instead prefers to give you whole fruits/vegetables/flowers. As such, you’ll find a random selection of produce has now appeared in your Sims’ inventory. Click on each one in turn and select ‘Place In World‘ to have your Sim leave tomatoes, basil, carrots and such on pretty much every available surface in your house.
  • 5) Next you need to head back into Build mode, and pick up each piece of produce, before moving it to wherever you plan on planting it, whether it be a planter box, pot or space spot of ground on your lot.

Use build mode to place all your plants as you see fit.

  • 6) Once you’ve arranged your produce as you see fit, get hold of your Sim again, now in Live mode, click on one of the plants, and tell your Sim to ‘plant’ it. They should then go off and plant everything plantable on the lot automatically, although it’s probably worth keeping an eye on them just in case.
  • 7) Now you finally have the garden of your dreams! Just remember to regularly weed, water and fertilise them to get the most out of your crops!

As you level up your Gardening skill, you’ll be able to purchase packs of rarer and harder to find seeds – they can be found via the build/buy catalogue, as before, or by clicking on a planter box and selecting the ‘Purchase Seeds‘ option. Each packet will have a random choice of crops in it, so you may need to buy a few different packs to get the produce you’re after. The following is a list of all the seed packets on offer, and the requirements for unlocking them:

  • Starter Flowers, Starter Fruits, Starter Herbs, Starter Vegetables, $35 each, unlocked from the start
  • Seasonal Summer Plants, Seasonal Fall Plants, Seasonal Winter Plants, Seasonal Spring Plants, $100 each, unlocked at Gardening skill level 5
  • Farmer Flowers and Fruit, Farmer Veggies and Herbs, $100 each, unlocked at Gardening skill level 7
  • Uncommon Plants, $250 each, unlocked at Gardening skill level 7, includes some of the harder-to-find ‘uncommon’ level plants
  • Rare Plants, $1000 each, unlocked at Gardening skill level 10, includes some of the harder-to-find ‘rare’ level plants

What effect do the different seasons have on your plants?

In the real world, planting something out of season is basically a waste of good seeds, because without the right environment, you’re unlikely to see any results. The Sims 4: Seasons however is much more lenient, and you can largely plant anything and everything whenever you choose, and nothing bad will happen. However, if you’ve planted something out of season, nothing good will happen either – seeds pretty much stay in stasis in their off seasons, only growing and producing at the correct time of year.

How do you care for your plants in The Sims 4: Seasons?

We’ve already covered how to plant your seeds in The Sims 4: Seasons, but as any gardener will tell you, that’s just the start of the work to be done when it comes to raising your own fruit, vegetables and flowers.

In The Sims 4: Seasons, there are three main ways you’ll want to care for your crops:

  • Watering
    One of the basics, this is a simple matter of clicking on your plants and selecting ‘Water‘. Your Sim will then chug along watering all of your seedlings automatically. Be careful though – if you forget to water your plants for a few days in a row, they’ll end up dying, and all your hard work will be for naught. Happily, rainy days will water your plants automatically, giving you a day off in the process.
  • Weeding
    Sometimes, when you’re looking at your crops, they may look a bit unkempt, which is a sure sign they need a bit of weeding to carry on growing at their best. As with watering, this is a basic interaction accessed by clicking on the plant in question. If a plant doesn’t need weeding at that moment in time, the option will be greyed out.

Weeds can be a little tricky to spot, appearing at the base of your plants. If you don’t keep it under control, your plants might wither and die!

  • Fertilising
    Nowhere near as essential as the previous two, fertilising lets you take a bit of a short cut towards better quality plants and produce, by reducing the time it takes for your plant to evolve. Various things can be used as fertiliser, including other plants – although fish is apparently the best of the best, and the rarer your catch, the more effective it is as a fertiliser.
  • Research
    Another interesting option that crops up once your plants start growing a little, research lets you learn more about the plant in question. All researching really seems to do is unlock a brief entry on the plant in your Sims’ mobile phone notebook, and – if you’re lucky – it might tell you a grafting combination. However, it does help raise your Gardening skill while you do it, so it can be a pretty handy pastime for swotting up on your skills.
  • Spray for Insects
    Mostly a problem in the warmer months, you’ll want to keep an eye out for any swarms of blacks bugs circling around your precious plants. Again, this option only pops up when you actually have an insect infestation, but clicking on your plant and choosing ‘Spray Area for Bugs‘ sorts them out in seconds flat. Insects can really do a number on your plants, killing them in a matter of days if you’re not careful, so you’ll definitely want to keep an eye out for bugs!

If you look carefully, you’ll spot some black flies swarming around your plants – make sure you spray them, stat!

How do you improve the quality of your plants and produce?

To improve the quality of your plants and produce in The Sims 4: Seasons, you essentially have to take good enough care of your plants to evolve them, with each new evolution bringing with it a jump in quality. You can speed up the time between evolution stages by applying fertiliser. There are five different stages of plant quality, Normal, Nice, Excellent, Magnificent and Perfect, which will in turn correspond to the quality of the produce you can harvest from it. Note that taking a cutting from a plant does cause a drop in the quality bar, increasing the time it takes for your plant to reach the next level, so you don’t want to take too many.

What does “evolving” a plant actually mean?

All plants in The Sims 4: Seasons have needs – namely watering, weeding and pest control. If you can keep them in check for a certain period of time, your plant will reach the point where it can “evolve” onto its next stage. Think of your plants as effectively miniature, bushier versions of your Sims and you wouldn’t be too far off, as you’ll need to work on satisfying all their wants and needs before they move on to the next stage of life – or in this case, quality.

If you’ve managed to take decent care of your plant, you may notice it start to sparkle – clicking on it will give you the option to ‘Evolve‘ it, causing the quality bar above to jump into the next section. Plants can go through five stages of evolution, corresponding to five stages of quality, from Normal to Nice, Excellent, Magnificent and Perfect. Only crops produced after you’ve evolved the plant will have the new, better quality; anything not harvested on your plant prior to evolution will be of the older, not so good quality instead.

Applying fertiliser to your plants reduces the time it takes for it to reach the next evolution stage, so applying the best fertiliser you can as often as you can is the key to reaching the Perfect produce as quickly as possible. Taking cuttings reduces the quality of your plants, increasing the time it takes for them to reach the next level – so don’t go crazy!

Cuttings and Grafting: How to create brand new plants in The Sims 4: Seasons

Unlocked at level five of the Gardening skill, being able to ‘Take Cuttings‘ and ‘Graft‘ is perhaps one of the most significant milestones in the skill tree, and one that will help you discover some of the more elusive plant species out there.

Take Cutting
Only usable on plants that have grown at least a little, the ‘Take Cutting‘ option sees your Sim slice off a small chunk of the plant and stash it in their inventory for future use. All cuttings are stacked onto the same inventory item, regardless of the plant they’ve come from – but don’t worry though, they’ll separate out later, when it comes to grafting them on to other plants. Be careful not to take cuttings too often, though, as it both reduces the overall quality of your plant and you run the risk of killing your plants if you don’t give it time to recover in between.

Taking cuttings and grafting them on are two of the key skills you’ll need to use if you want to grow ’em all.

Graft
Greyed out until you have some plant cuttings in your inventory, the ‘Graft‘ option lets you splice your cuttings from one plant onto another to produce either a combination of existing produce, or to create something entirely new. The main purpose of this is to make the easier to obtain bushes produce fruit/vegetables of rarer types by attaching cuttings you’ve taken from hard-to-find plants found out in the wild, or by combining two basic plants to produce something more unusual. Once you’ve grafted on a cutting, the altered plant will then produce both its original crop and some of the grafted-on crop. Once you harvest the new fruit/vegetable, you can replant it to create a plant of that type, which will produce only that crop, to maximise your yields and profit.

Some notable grafting combinations are as follows:

  • Basil + Sage = Parsley
  • Chrysanthemum + Tulip = Birds of Paradise
  • Bluebell + Strawberry = Grapes
  • Lily + Snapdragon = Orchid
  • Apple + Cherry = Pomegranate
  • Pear + Lemon = Plantain
  • Snapdragon + Strawberry = Dragon Fruit
  • Snapdragon + Dragon Fruit = Cowberry
  • Grape + Rose = Bonsai Buds
  • Pomegranate + Orchid = Death Flower

If you’re short on space or time in your garden, you can use the graft ability to condense a little, by splicing several different cuttings onto a single bush, which will then produce several different fruits/vegetables/flowers at once (albeit in a smaller yield than the lone bushes would). Grafting can also be exploited to increase yields of some slower growing crops by taking cuttings of them and splicing them on to a plant that produces much faster, thereby accelerating your rate of production. It’s also worth noting that, while mushrooms are one of the fastest growing crops in the game, you cannot take cuttings of them, nor graft anything onto them.

What plants can you grow in The Sims 4: Seasons?

Some plants are classed as ‘Wild’, and can’t be found in any of the purchasable seed packets. For these, you’ll need to search other neighbourhoods and locations, and find the plants growing there. Once you’ve found them, it’s simply a question of taking a cutting home with you, before grafting it onto one of your existing plants as mentioned above. Then all you need to do is sit back and wait to harvest your new crop, with the option of planting the new crop to get the formerly “wild” plant in your back garden.

  • Apple
  • Basil
  • Birds of Paradise
  • Blackberry
  • Bluebells
  • Bonsai Buds
  • Carrot
  • Cherry
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Cowberry
  • Daisy
  • Death Flower
  • DragonFruit
  • Grapes
  • Lemon
  • Lily
  • Mushroom
  • Onion
  • Orchid
  • Parsley
  • Pear
  • Plantain
  • Pomegranate
  • Potato
  • Rose
  • Sage
  • Snapdragon
  • Spinach
  • Strawberry
  • Tomato
  • Trash Fruit
  • Tulip
  • Unidentified Fruit Object

Seasons Expansion Pack

  • Bell Pepper
  • Begonias
  • Christmas Rose
  • Crocus
  • Dahlia
  • Green Peas
  • Green Beans
  • Holly
  • Snow Drop

Exclusive to other Expansion Packs/Game Packs

  • Catnip (requires Cats & Dogs)
  • Madnip (requires Cats & Dogs)
  • Napnip (requires Cats & Dogs)
  • Nuzzlenip (requires Cats & Dogs)
  • Avocado (requires Jungle Adventure)
  • Black Beans (requires Jungle Adventure)
  • Cereberry (requires Jungle Adventure)
  • Flutterberry (requires Jungle Adventure)
  • Gutsberry (requires Jungle Adventure)
  • Merry Berry (requires Jungle Adventure)
  • Museberry (requires Jungle Adventure)
  • Razzleberry (requires Jungle Adventure)
  • Vimberry (requires Jungle Adventure)
  • Garlic (requires Vampires)
  • Plasma Fruit (requires Vampires)
  • Wolfsbane (requires Vampires)
  • Fang Flower (requires Get to Work)
  • Glow Orb (requires Get to Work)
  • Quill Fruit (requires Get to Work)
  • Chamomile (requires Outdoor Retreat)
  • Elderberry (requires Outdoor Retreat)
  • False Morel Mushroom (requires Outdoor Retreat)
  • Fireleaf (requires Outdoor Retreat)
  • Huckleberry (requires Outdoor Retreat)
  • Morel Mushroom (requires Outdoor Retreat)
  • Muckleberry (requires Outdoor Retreat)
  • Noxious Elderberry (requires Outdoor Retreat)
  • Poison Fireleaf (requires Outdoor Retreat)
  • Toxic Chamomile (requires Outdoor Retreat)

Patchy the Straw Man – your lovable gardening assistant!

In a world where crows and other pesky birds stealing your produce isn’t really an issue, you may wonder what the point of a scarecrow is, outside of simple decoration. Well, in The Sims 4: Seasons, a scarecrow can be quite a valuable asset to your little garden, in the form of ‘Patchy the Straw Man‘. For a measly $450, and found under the Outdoors > Outdoor Activities tab, putting a Patchy on your plot will make your little gardening hobby much less of a chore for your poor Sim.

Patchy will come to life and help out with your garden chores.

Once you’re purchased and placed your Patchy, you’ll want to send your Sim over to him and choose the ‘Chat with Scarecrow’ option. It doesn’t really matter what you talk about (although out of respect for the guy, we decided not to ‘Question Ability to Actually Scare Crows) – the whole point here is just to fill up the friendship bar above his head. Thankfully, it’s a much quicker process than trying to befriend a neighbour, and once the bar’s full, you can move on to the next stage, having unlocked a scarecrow-themed Create-A-Sim outfit for your trouble.

Now you and Patchy are bros, you have the following options to interact with him:

  • Examine Pockets for Seeds
    Does exactly what it says on the tin, checking the scarecrow’s pockets for any stray seeds. Sometimes you’ll get lucky, sometimes you won’t, but you can try every three hours or so.
  • Ask for Gardening Tips
    Who better to ask for advice than your local neighbourhood scarecrow? This one comes with the added bonus of a whole chunk of Gardening experience in the process, which should give you a helpful nudge closer to your next level. This can be done once every twelve hours or so.

Once you’re friends, Patchy will also periodically come to life and help out with your gardening chores, for five hours or so at a time. It won’t necessarily happen every day, but if there’s gardening work left undone, Patchy does seem to have a preference for it. On the other hand, if you’re already a pretty diligent gardener, and there’s no watering or weeding to be done, Patchy’s also more than happy to kill time watching your TV, with a particular preference for chat shows (at least in our experience). We’ve even caught him cleaning our grubby kitchen counters on occasion! While he’s up and about, you can also engage him in more deep and meaningful conversations, build up a bit of a rapport with the guy, or even go as far as to WooHoo with him, if you so desire.

Perhaps it’s because Doris is such a diligent gardener, but Patchy seems to spend most of his time parked in front of the TV!

How to grow a Death Flower in The Sims 4: Seasons

While you may not have heard of them, Death Flowers are one of The Sims 4’s best kept secrets when it comes to cheating the Grim Reaper. Essentially a ‘get out of death free’ card, when old Grim comes a-knockin’, you can exchange a Death Flower for another go at life for a particular Sim – and, with the help of your new-found gardening skill, you can effectively get an unlimited supply, if you do it right. It’s a bit of a long-winded process though, so you’ll need to do the following:

  1. Make a Pomegranate tree by grafting a Cherry to an Apple tree.
  2. Make an Orchid by grafting a Lily onto a Snapdragon flower.
  3. Graft the Pomegranate onto the Orchid to make Death Flowers.
  4. Plant one of the harvested Death Flowers to create a Death Flower plant, which will produce pretty much unlimited Death Flowers, letting you cheat death over and over!

Cow Plant Care 101

While not specific to The Sims 4: Seasons expansion, growing a Cow Plant is definitely something all the completionist gardeners out there will want to try their hand at growing, at least once. For those not in the know, the Cow Plant is essentially a Venus fly trap-type plant with a taste for living, breathing Sims, and could be a valuable ally for those players who like to cause as much chaos for their little Sims’ lives as possible.

Obviously no-one told The Sims cows are herbivores.

How to grow your Cow Plant
In order to grow a Cow Plant, you first need to get hold of an elusive Cowberry (sometimes known as Bovine Buds). There are a couple of ways of doing this (fishing, digging, heading to outer space), but as this is a gardening guide, we’re going to get grafting:

  1. Make a Dragon Fruit plant by taking a cutting of a Snapdragon and grafting it onto a Strawberry plant.
  2. Plant the resulting Dragon Fruit it produces to grow your own Dragon Fruit bush.
  3. Take a cutting of your Dragon Fruit bush, and graft it onto the original Snapdragon plant. When this fruits, you should get a Cowberry.
  4. Plant the Cowberry to grow yourself a Cowberry Plant. Cow Plants are a bit different in that they don’t produce any berries as crops, so you’ll need to go through the whole fandango each time you want a new plant.
  5. Once you’ve planted it, you’ll need to water and weed it as per normal for a few days until it fully matures – and then the fun begins.

Caring for your Cow Plant
Once it’s fully grown, you’ll be able to interact with your Cow Plant in a few different ways:
Feed – this is incredibly important for the Cow Plant, as you’ll need to feed it at least every twelve hours or so, or else it might come back to bite you (quite literally!)

  • Feed
    This is incredibly important for the Cow Plant, as you’ll need to feed it at least every twelve hours or so, or else it might come back to bite you (quite literally!).
  • Play/Pet
    Some more social interactions with your Cow Plant, both of which will reward you with gardening experience.
  • Eat Cake
    If you haven’t fed your Cow Plant recently, it’ll take matters into it’s own hands and try to lure in a Sim-sized snack by dangling a delicious-looking cake decoy nearby. Hungry visitors, peckish members of the family or just generally foolish Sims may try to take a bite of the cake, which can result in death.
  • Milk
    Available when Sims have been swallowed by the Cow Plant. If they were spat back out, still living, you’ll be able to milk the Cow Plant for a drink of ‘Essence‘ that matches whatever mood they were in at the time of eating. If they were swallowed up and killed, you can milk the Cow Plant for an ‘Essence of Sim Life‘, which can be used to extend your Sim’s lifespan by resetting them to the beginning of their current life stage.
  • Collect Sample
    Only for Sims will a Logic Skill of level 2 or higher, telling a Sim to ‘Collect Sample‘ from the Cow Plant, then examining it under a microscope will unlock a special painting (the ‘Blemish Blossom‘) to decorate your walls.

If, after twelve hours of no food, and after about twelve hours of no luck cake-fishing, your Cow Plant can die, leaving behind a skeleton of its former self.

In Conclusion

And that’s your lot! Hopefully we’ve answered all your budding The Sims 4: Seasons questions, but if not, feel free to drop us a line and we’ll see what we can do! We’ll be updating this article with more gardening hints, tips and how tos as we play, so make sure you keep checking back – and in the meantime, happy gardening and happy Sim-ing!

The lowdown on planting seeds, better quality produce and creating new species in the latest Sims expansion