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strains from the 70s

Why Is Cannabis Now So Different From 1970s Cannabis?

They came in kilo bricks. By boat, in trucks, and in cargo planes, pounds of dried-up flakes and pieces of cannabis plants worked their way up from Colombia to be distributed and sold in the United States. While cannabis has been a part of American culture since the country’s birth, cannabis today is certainly not what it used to be. Not only has the industry changed, but so have the plant’s potency and general appearance.

So, what exactly were those free-spirits smoking in the 1970s? Since cannabis was named a Schedule 1 drug in 1970, the Natural Center for Natural Projects Research (NCNPR) at the University of Mississippi has been testing marijuana samples confiscated in U.S. marijuana raids. In agreement with popular belief, today’s marijuana is 57-67% more potent when compared to samples from the ’70s. In this instance, potency is measured by the levels of psychoactive cannabinoids present in individual plant samples. The reasoning behind this massive increase in potency, however, is quite complicated.

Beginning in the 1970s, the majority of cannabis consumed for recreational use was imported illegally from source countries. In the 1970s, around 72% of cannabis in circulation was brought into the U.S. rather than produced on the homefront. Of that 72%, between 50 and 60% was brought in from Colombia. Between growing time, transportation, and distribution, the cannabis found in the 1970s was on average much older due to time it took to get from farm to consumer.

An increase in general knowledge about cannabis has also had a huge effect on the quality of the usable product. Back in the ’70s, much of the cannabis brought in to the U.S. was a mixture of leaves, stems, flowers, and hodgepodge pieces of the plant. Very little of the brick-packed, mass-produced product was actually the feminized flower (sinsemilla) that we now expect when walking into a dispensary. This means that when people used cannabis, they were not using the plant parts high in tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the most well-known compound in cannabis that produces psychoactive effects. Rather, members of the “Me Generation” were getting the leftovers.

It wasn’t until hydroponic systems became prevalent in the 1980s that marijuana imports slowed and we saw a jump in potency of the average sample. This new technology allowed more Americans to grow discretely right in their own backyards (or, more likely, their basements), which resulted in fresher marijuana closer to home. This new ability to produce cannabis on a local level meant the beginning of the boom in higher quality connoisseur strains.

Another big jump in potency occurred in the early 2000s. While brick marijuana was pervasive throughout the 1990s, imported brick product was out of favor by 2010. In 2000, 3.2% of sampled cannabis came from sinsemilla, yet by 2010 sinsemilla became the norm, representing a whopping 60% of seized samples. As more marijuana was being produced right in the United States, there was opportunity for research and observation. In perhaps one of the most revolutionary moments in cannabis culture, industry members distinguished the sinsemilla as the best source of cannabinoids in the plant. Now, just a few years later, the potency of marijuana continues to increase as the cannabis industry becomes more high tech than ever.

After all of these statistics, there are a few questions which need to be asked. How much more more potent can cannabis get? Each year, more and more states legalize cannabis for medicinal use. The Green Rush to legalization is a step toward turning reality into safe policy. Yet, as technology continues to advance and strains become more specialized (bred specifically for potency and targeting for medicinal effects), the potential for turning cannabis into a different plant altogether only increases. Are these increases in potency a hopeful sign for the medical marijuana industry, or do they suggest that cannabis is going down a different pharmacological route? Right now, the future of cannabis seems wide open.

Bagley, B. M. (October 01, 1988). “Colombia and the War on Drugs”. Foreign Affairs, 67, 1, 70-92.

Sevigny, E. L. (January 01, 2013). “Is today’s marijuana more potent simply because it’s fresher?”. Drug Testing and Analysis, 5, 1, 62-7.

While cannabis has been a part of American culture since the country's birth, cannabis today is not what it used to be. So what exactly were those free-spirits smoking in the 1970s?

70s weed strains

There are some cannabis strains that are known to almost every smoker, even those who are new to the scene. These strains have earned high status and hold impressive reputations due to their unique properties and successful genetics. Perhaps they offer a recognisable and potent aroma; maybe they spoil growers with massive yields; or they might be very high in THC. Whatever the reason, these strains are not to be missed out on. They are musts for novice and veteran cannabis smokers alike. Here is a top 10 list of some truly classic cannabis strains, all available from Royal Queen Seeds.

Northern Lights is certainly another absolutely classic strain that is well-known all around the world by name alone. The origins of the legendary strain remain somewhat of a mystery, although it is believed to have come out of the west coast of America. The exact genetics of the strain are unknown, though rumour has it that Northern Lights was from Afghanistan, yet other sources claim the original plants contained Thai genetics.
White Widow is a legendary name within the worldwide cannabis scene. The very mention of the name conjures images of cannabis flowers heavy with shining white trichomes. There is probably no other strain out there with quite the reputation that White Widow has built for itself over the years. The origin of White Widow is quite a controversial subject and a topic that is often debated, however it has been confirmed that the original White Widow is indeed a Dutch classic and was grown initially in The Netherlands. As far as ancestry goes, the original White Widow was the love child of a pure sativa landrace derived from Brazil, and an indica hybrid from southern India. It is reported that White Widow is the result of years of breeding in the mountains or Kerala, a project that aimed to produce cannabis plants dense with resin.

OG Kush features a strong and dank taste when smoked that generates a long-lasting aftertaste. The scent of the strain is very potent with citrus and Diesel aromas.
White Widow is also recognised for its complex and equally delightful scent and flavour profiles. Upon smoking this strain, smokers’ taste buds will be ignited by tastes of hashish, rose, bitterness, sweetness, and sourness. The scent of the flowers is sensational and features hints of hashish, sweetness, and tropical tones.
Haze Berry is known for more than just the impressive high that it catalyses. The strain offers sensual delights in terms of its complex flavour profile and aromatic palate. When opening up a stash jar or bag filled with the dried flowers of Haze Berry, fumes carrying the scents of berries and fruity sweetness will be released. When smoking a joint or blunt loaded with the strain, tastes of berry, fruit, sweetness, lemon, and vanilla will be detected.
The high generated from smoking the flowers of Blue Cheese is very balanced between a body high and a head high, mainly due to the genetic balance of the strain. The effect overall is a strong stone. The genetic makeup of this strain contributes to a lovely taste. The fruity flavour of Blueberry mixes perfectly with the earthy tones of the Cheese.
The head high generated by smoking White Widow flowers is defined by meditative, thought provoking, and relaxing states of being. It is also slightly psychedelic and offers aphrodisiac properties. On the other hand, the body high creates a stoned sensation that is deeply calming, sleepy, and narcotic. It will more than likely plunge the user into a state of the munchies at some point in the smoke session.

The taste profile offered by Critical is very complex and equally as delicious. When smoking a large blunt or bowl loaded with these flowers, expect your taste buds to be treated to hints of orange, honey, spice, sweetness, and bitterness. The smell experienced from stepping into a grow room full of these plants will also be impressive, featuring scents of blueberry, rose, coffee, lime, and chocolate.

These top 10 classic strains have made a large mark within the cannabis scene and are known all over the world for their high status.

Bagley, B. M. (October 01, 1988). “Colombia and the War on Drugs”. Foreign Affairs, 67, 1, 70-92.

Another big jump in potency occurred in the early 2000s. While brick marijuana was pervasive throughout the 1990s, imported brick product was out of favor by 2010. In 2000, 3.2% of sampled cannabis came from sinsemilla, yet by 2010 sinsemilla became the norm, representing a whopping 60% of seized samples. As more marijuana was being produced right in the United States, there was opportunity for research and observation. In perhaps one of the most revolutionary moments in cannabis culture, industry members distinguished the sinsemilla as the best source of cannabinoids in the plant. Now, just a few years later, the potency of marijuana continues to increase as the cannabis industry becomes more high tech than ever.
It wasn’t until hydroponic systems became prevalent in the 1980s that marijuana imports slowed and we saw a jump in potency of the average sample. This new technology allowed more Americans to grow discretely right in their own backyards (or, more likely, their basements), which resulted in fresher marijuana closer to home. This new ability to produce cannabis on a local level meant the beginning of the boom in higher quality connoisseur strains.

They came in kilo bricks. By boat, in trucks, and in cargo planes, pounds of dried-up flakes and pieces of cannabis plants worked their way up from Colombia to be distributed and sold in the United States. While cannabis has been a part of American culture since the country’s birth, cannabis today is certainly not what it used to be. Not only has the industry changed, but so have the plant’s potency and general appearance.
So, what exactly were those free-spirits smoking in the 1970s? Since cannabis was named a Schedule 1 drug in 1970, the Natural Center for Natural Projects Research (NCNPR) at the University of Mississippi has been testing marijuana samples confiscated in U.S. marijuana raids. In agreement with popular belief, today’s marijuana is 57-67% more potent when compared to samples from the ’70s. In this instance, potency is measured by the levels of psychoactive cannabinoids present in individual plant samples. The reasoning behind this massive increase in potency, however, is quite complicated.
Beginning in the 1970s, the majority of cannabis consumed for recreational use was imported illegally from source countries. In the 1970s, around 72% of cannabis in circulation was brought into the U.S. rather than produced on the homefront. Of that 72%, between 50 and 60% was brought in from Colombia. Between growing time, transportation, and distribution, the cannabis found in the 1970s was on average much older due to time it took to get from farm to consumer.
After all of these statistics, there are a few questions which need to be asked. How much more more potent can cannabis get? Each year, more and more states legalize cannabis for medicinal use. The Green Rush to legalization is a step toward turning reality into safe policy. Yet, as technology continues to advance and strains become more specialized (bred specifically for potency and targeting for medicinal effects), the potential for turning cannabis into a different plant altogether only increases. Are these increases in potency a hopeful sign for the medical marijuana industry, or do they suggest that cannabis is going down a different pharmacological route? Right now, the future of cannabis seems wide open.
An increase in general knowledge about cannabis has also had a huge effect on the quality of the usable product. Back in the ’70s, much of the cannabis brought in to the U.S. was a mixture of leaves, stems, flowers, and hodgepodge pieces of the plant. Very little of the brick-packed, mass-produced product was actually the feminized flower (sinsemilla) that we now expect when walking into a dispensary. This means that when people used cannabis, they were not using the plant parts high in tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the most well-known compound in cannabis that produces psychoactive effects. Rather, members of the “Me Generation” were getting the leftovers.

Sevigny, E. L. (January 01, 2013). “Is today’s marijuana more potent simply because it’s fresher?”. Drug Testing and Analysis, 5, 1, 62-7.

While cannabis has been a part of American culture since the country’s birth, cannabis today is not what it used to be. So what exactly were those free-spirits smoking in the 1970s?

There are some cannabis strains that are known to almost every smoker, even those who are new to the scene. These strains have earned high status and hold