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Why Smoking Reclaimed Cannabis Resin Isn’t a Good Idea

Cannabis is quickly becoming legalized in many areas of the United States, and many newly introduced people are curious about the preparations of this psychoactive plant.

Cannabis resin, or reclaim, is a byproduct of smoked cannabis. It’s commonly found on the inside of smoking tools.

Although seasoned users may be familiar with reclaimed cannabis resin, many are still unaware of the potentially harmful effects of using this cannabis byproduct.

In this article, we’ll explore some of the different forms of cannabis resin, what reclaimed cannabis resin is, and what you need to know about smoking reclaimed cannabis resin.

Cannabis resin is a substance that’s naturally produced in the trichomes of the cannabis plant.

This natural substance contains many of the active compounds that cannabis is known for, including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component of the cannabis plant.

What are trichomes?

Trichomes are exterior growths on plants that protect them from dangers, such as fungus, pests, and ultraviolet rays.

The resin found in cannabis plants appears as either a sticky secretion or a powdery substance and can present in a variety of colors.

Cannabis resin can be extracted directly from the plant or from the tools used to smoke the cannabis plant. This resin has different names depending on how it’s extracted.

Some of the most common cannabis resin preparations include:

  • Hashish. Also called hash, this is cannabis resin that’s extracted from the plant and dried into a pressed powder.
  • Rosin. This is cannabis resin that’s extracted from the plant using heat and pressure.
  • Resin or reclaim. Also called weed tar, this is cannabis resin extracted from tools, like a pipe or dab rig, after smoking.

When discussing cannabis resin, it helps to understand the distinction between the various types of resin, what they’re called, and how they’re used.

Hash and rosin

Hash and rosin aren’t usually called “resin” because they’re extracted directly from the plant.

Preparations like these are a popular choice for people who are looking to smoke or vape something more concentrated than dried cannabis leaves.

Hash and rosin are often stronger and have a longer-lasting high than traditional preparations.

Leftover resin or reclaim

Leftover resin, or reclaim, is often simply called “resin.” People usually only smoke it to avoid wasting any cannabis that may be left over in the pipe.

In fact, most people dispose of the reclaimed resin when cleaning out their tools rather than smoke it.

Cannabis resin or reclaim is the sticky byproduct that can be found cannabis pipes or dab rigs. Unlike fresh resin products like hashish and rosin, reclaimed cannabis resin is a harsh product that can irritate the throat and lungs. Learn about the side effects of smoking cannabis resin.

Marijuana Research Report
What are marijuana’s effects on lung health?

Like tobacco smoke, marijuana smoke is an irritant to the throat and lungs and can cause a heavy cough during use. It also contains levels of volatile chemicals and tar that are similar to tobacco smoke, raising concerns about risk for cancer and lung disease. 67

Marijuana smoking is associated with large airway inflammation, increased airway resistance, and lung hyperinflation, and those who smoke marijuana regularly report more symptoms of chronic bronchitis than those who do not smoke. 67,68 One study found that people who frequently smoke marijuana had more outpatient medical visits for respiratory problems than those who do not smoke. 69 Some case studies have suggested that, because of THC’s immune-suppressing effects, smoking marijuana might increase susceptibility to lung infections, such as pneumonia, in people with immune deficiencies; however, a large AIDS cohort study did not confirm such an association. 67 Smoking marijuana may also reduce the respiratory system’s immune response, increasing the likelihood of the person acquiring respiratory infections, including pneumonia. 68 Animal and human studies have not found that marijuana increases risk for emphysema. 67

Reports of Deaths Related to Vaping Marijuana

The Food and Drug Administration has alerted the public to hundreds of reports of serious lung illnesses associated with vaping, including several deaths. They are working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to investigate the cause of these illnesses. Many of the suspect products tested by the states or federal health officials have been identified as vaping products containing THC, the main psychotropic ingredient in marijuana. Some of the patients reported a mixture of THC and nicotine; and some reported vaping nicotine alone. No one substance has been identified in all of the samples tested, and it is unclear if the illnesses are related to one single compound. Until more details are known, FDA officials have warned people not to use any vaping products bought on the street, and they warn against modifying any products purchased in stores. They are also asking people and health professionals to report any adverse effects. The CDC has posted an information page for consumers.

Whether smoking marijuana causes lung cancer, as cigarette smoking does, remains an open question. 67,70 Marijuana smoke contains carcinogenic combustion products, including about 50% more benzoprene and 75% more benzanthracene (and more phenols, vinyl chlorides, nitrosamines, reactive oxygen species) than cigarette smoke. 67 Because of how it is typically smoked (deeper inhale, held for longer), marijuana smoking leads to four times the deposition of tar compared to cigarette smoking. 71 However, while a few small, uncontrolled studies have suggested that heavy, regular marijuana smoking could increase risk for respiratory cancers, well-designed population studies have failed to find an increased risk of lung cancer associated with marijuana use. 67

One complexity in comparing the lung-health risks of marijuana and tobacco concerns the very different ways the two substances are used. While people who smoke marijuana often inhale more deeply and hold the smoke in their lungs for a longer duration than is typical with cigarettes, marijuana’s effects last longer, so people who use marijuana may smoke less frequently than those who smoke cigarettes.

Additionally, the fact that many people use both marijuana and tobacco makes determining marijuana’s precise contribution to lung cancer risk, if any, difficult to establish. Cell culture and animal studies have also suggested THC and CBD may have antitumor effects, and this has been proposed as one reason why stronger expected associations are not seen between marijuana use and lung cancer, but more research is needed on this question. 67

Like tobacco smoke, marijuana smoke is an irritant to the throat and lungs and can cause a heavy cough during use. It also contains levels of volatile chemicals and tar that are similar to tobacco smoke, raising concerns about risk for cancer and lung disease.