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White marijuana, myth or reality?

White marijuana, myth or reality

It has long been believed that white marijuana was a product of fiction such as the unicorn or the Snowman. An extravagance that could not be more than a product of photographic montages.

The lack of light caused the plants to turn white, and so the New York White regia was born, to which some growers would go to give love in the sewers to harvest their white and superpowerful buds.

In this post we are going to try to dismantle some myths that run on the internet and we are going to look at the subject from the most scientific prism.

? Introduction

White marijuana is the result of genetic mutation, just as it happens in nature, this phenomenon is known as albinism.

Albinism is not an exclusive mutation of animals, it can also occur in plants. In both cases the phenomenon is characterized by the absence of pigments, melanin in animals and chlorophyll in plants.

the phenomenon is characterized by the absence of pigments

? White cannabis plants

The white colour in marijuana occurs from time to time, as a result of a double recessive gene that determines the absence of chlorophyll or a bad development of the genes that order the production of pigment.

The first one gives like result an absolutely white plant, although it is not the most usual thing; and in the second case what mutates is the bud or a part of the plant. Another possible explanation is that the deficient pigmentation is due to the non-conformity between the nuclear and chloroplastic genomes.

Chlorophyll is the pigment that gives colour to plants. Its purpose, more than aesthetic, is vital since it is necessary for the photosynthesis process. The chlorophyll of cannabis leaves is responsible for absorbing sunlight, triggering the chemical reaction that produces glucose feeding the plant from carbon dioxide (CO₂) and raw sap obtained from mineral salts and subsoil water.

The deficient pigmentation is due to the non-conformity between the nuclear and chloroplastic genomes

? Effects of white cannabis

If it is true that the white marijuana gives us with a beautiful flower, chlorophyll low levels deliver a product of lower quality compared to conventional varieties.

The albino marijuana cannot create the necessary energy to provoke the chemical reactions that cannabinoids produce, present in low concentrations in this type of marijuana, destiny almost has made them a Chinese vase.

In addition to genetic factors, albinism can have environmental triggers such as light, temperature and substrate cultivation.

Cannabis plants may have white tones due to light exposure. These varieties are not albino or white, but green plants discolored during growth by an intentional approach or by accident to a light source, such as a high-intensity lamp focus that affects the pigment.

This causes a whitening, which mainly affects the overexposed areas of the plant. This alteration is usually manifested in plants cultivated indoors, but it is very rare that it occurs outdoors.

Discoloration due to light overexposure causes stress in plants, although it usually affects only those parts of the plant that receive light excess. Depigmentation progress can be avoided with the use of fertilizers and light adjustments.

Genetic factors produce a small amount of chlorophyll when the albino plant germinates. On the other hand, in chlorosis, a disease that can disturb our shoots, bleaching is caused by a shortage of nutrients in the subsoil.

Marijuana needs abundant nitrogen (N), a moderate amount of potassium (K) and a lower proportion of phosphorus (P) in its vegetative growth phase. Less nitrogen, more phosphorus and similar levels of potassium in the flowering phase, to which micronutrients such as calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), boron (B), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), sulphur (S), molybdenum (Mo), magnesium (Mg) and zinc (Zn) are added to multiply the number and size of your buds.

When depigmentation is caused by chlorosis, you can stop it by supplying fertilizers containing these elements and by providing a glucose supplement to extend life expectancy of the plant and increase the production rates of its fruit.

Cannabis chlorosis doesn’t have to be a bad thing.

The inability of albino specimens to execute the photosynthesis process means that these plants do not have the ability to reproduce. Most of them have a short life period, which comes to an end without having to intervene any plague, because the lack of chlorophyll is enough to slow down the flower development. The cuttings that eventually sprout are predestined to an immediate death.

In spite of it, some specimens of white marijuana can live a lot of time. Experts have not been able to determine with certainty of how they feed chlorophyll lack to elaborate their own nutrients; although everything points to that they are parasites that are nourished from the carbohydrates obtained by the synthesis of other organisms.

Almost-albine varieties, known as variegades, are more likely to reach maturity

✅ Conclusion

Albino plants are an obstacle to maximizing the harvest, crop quality and growth rate, so most growers will prefer to let them die if they show signs of albinism in early stages of life.

In fact, recently, there are many producers who, just for the fact of having this white plant, of great beauty (which cannot be denied) between their crops, they receive more plants of this type than there were until now. And what do you think? Do you want to have one or at least try it? We are waiting for your opinion!

Discover in PEV Grow all the truth about WHITE OR ALBINE MARIHUANA ✅ Discover the scientific side of this legend and ✨ dismantle myths with us! ✨

Albino Weed: The Stuff Of Legend Or Scientific Fact?

Albino weed is indeed a possibility. Despite scepticism of the phenomenon, both environmental and genetic factors play a role in the occurrence of the condition.

Every once in awhile whilst browsing the internet for the finest cannabis porn available, one might come across weed that isn’t in any way green. Some rare findings might involve stumbling across beautiful shots of cannabis that feature strong shades of purple and even red. However, the rarest sighting of them all has to be pure white weed.

This phenomenon is absolutely beautiful; the sight of alabaster, glistening buds erupting with streaks of red calyxes is a sight to behold. But what is at the root cause of such an outcome?

ALBINISM IN CANNABIS PLANTS

No, it’s not just a Photoshop job. Pure white cannabis plants do exist and emerge from time to time. However, this isn’t exactly the result of a successful and accurate breeding project, and it certainly isn’t intentional (most of the time). Pure, bright white cannabis plants are actually the result of albinism. Much like in animals, albinism can also occur in plants and is the result of a lack of pigmentation.

The pigment that usually makes cannabis leaves and flowers green is known as chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is an absolutely vital component in the life of plants as it plays a major role in the process of photosynthesis.

Photosynthesis is the process of converting light into sugars in order for plants to survive and thrive. The chlorophyll present within cannabis leaves is used to absorb the light in the first place.

So, although the white appearance of albino cannabis plants might look spectacular and impressive, it’s actually a massive genetic disadvantage. The pure white aesthetic is a sign of a huge lack of chlorophyll, meaning that albino plants are almost incapable of carrying out the process of photosynthesis and therefore cannot generate the energy they need in order to survive and reproduce.

BUSTING MYTHS

Some cannabis enthusiasts state the argument that albino cannabis plants don’t actually exist, and that all photographic evidence of this phenomenon is either false, or depicts other conditions instead of albinism.

This argument is in some ways reasonable, after all, how can a plant that is unable to carry out photosynthesis going to survive long enough to reach a respectable size?

Some of the sceptics out there believe that cannabis albinism isn’t albinism at all, and is simply a case of chlorosis. Chlorosis is a condition that can set-in due to a lack of nutrients in the soil. However, true albinism is a condition in which very little chlorophyll is produced from the get-go.

It is highly unlikely for a fully-albino cannabis plant to reach maturity for obvious reasons. However, partial albino plants, known as variegated plants, feature only slight albinism. These only have specific patches of white leaves and buds that are void of the green pigment. The rest of the plant is indeed green, loaded with chlorophyll, and able to photosynthesise.

THE CAUSES OF ALBINISM IN CANNABIS

Albinism can have numerous causes. Both environmental and genetic factors may play a role. Environmental conditions such as growing media, light, and temperature can all contribute to plant albinism.

However, genetic factors are reported to play a much more fundamental role in the rare condition. Albinism has been shown to be a recessive trait, with the pigment defect probably caused by incompatibilities between nuclear and chloroplast genomes.

Hybridisation is also believed to be a major cause of albinism. Cannabis growers and breeders sometimes backcross strains in order to tease out desired recessive traits that specific strains posses. In doing so, this process may cause albino traits to express themselves.

FALSE ALBINISM

Just because a cannabis plant starts to display a white aesthetic does not mean it is expressing albino traits. For example, plants can start to turn shades of white due to bleaching caused by lighting.

Sometimes, when the top buds and leaves of a tall cannabis plant get too close to the light source due to explosive growth, the intensity of the light may become too much. This occurrence can end up bleaching, which gives the overexposed parts of the plant a white appearance.

IS ALBINISM TO BE SOUGHT OUT OR AVOIDED?

Albinism is ultimately a genetic fault within a cannabis plant. If you are a grower or breeder that is seeking to maximise flower output, growth speed, and strain potency, albino plants will only get in the way of productivity and progress.

However, growers who have time on their hands may want to pursue albino cannabis plants out of experimental curiosity. These plants won’t do you any favours in terms of a potent and large stash, but they will certainly contribute toward some fantastic cannabis photography.

Many smokers have seen photos of pure, bright white cannabis plants. Is albino cannabis a reality? Or the result of photo manipulation?