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White Sage

White Sage (Salvia apiana; or Bee Sage) is a perennial shrub native to the Southern West Coast of the United States. While it is commonly used for smudging/incense (its leaves have a distinct aroma when burned), the indigenous tribes of the region have developed multiple uses for it as both a food and medicine.

Large mammals such as deer, antelope, elk, mountain sheep, and rabbits will eat the young foliage, and the small white to pale lavender flowers attract hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, and other insects. Small mammals such as squirrels and rabbits, and birds such as sparrows, grouse, and quail will eat mature seeds.

White Sage can reach between 3-4 feet tall, but when in flower, plant stalks can reach well over eight feet. It may take multiple years for plants to reach this height, but soil type and climate helps the plant reach its ideal. White Sage is also drought tolerant. In fact, over-watering can kill plants.

While White Sage is not an endangered plant, wild populations are prone to over-harvesting. Our white sage seed comes from our own farm and is NOT wildcrafted. We’ve maintained our own seed line for a better part of the last decade, and this has resulted in improved germination rates of the plant versus wildcrafted seed. This makes sourcing seed from our company an easy ethical choice.

White Sage will product harvestable foliage 120 days from seeding under ideal conditions. Plants are perennial and hardy to zones 9 and above and can be grown as an annual or over-wintered indoors in colder climates.

White Sage (Salvia apiana; or Bee Sage) is a perennial shrub native to the Southern West Coast of the United States. While it is commonly used for smudging/incense (its leaves have a distinct aroma when burned), the indigenous tribes of the region have developed multiple uses for it as both a food and medicine. Large m

White Sage

Quick Facts:

    • Attracts bees
    • Used as smudge

White Sage

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Description:

Salvia apiana. White Sage seeds, known as Buffalo Sage and Bee Sage, this is the sacred sage that is bundled and burned as smudge to purify places and things. This native of southwestern US and northern Mexico requires full sun, well drained soil, very little water, and good air circulation. It will eventually grow into a fair sized shrub with flowers that are highly attractive to bees. Its high oil content makes it extremely aromatic, and it is thought to have powerful antibacterial properties, among a host of other medicinal uses.

Quick Facts:

    • Attracts bees
    • Used as smudge

How To Grow

It’s nice to have one big, reliable sage bush at the corner of the garden. One plant usually provides enough herb for most families, and its flowers are strongly attractive to wild and domesticated bees. Even hummingbirds will stop for a sip. Propagating by cuttings is easier with sage than growing from seed, but both can be achieved with a little care. Follow along with this handy How to Grow Sage from seeds Guide and grow some flavour. Great fresh or dried.!

Latin
Salvia officinalis
Family: Lamiaceae

Difficulty
Easy but slow

Season & Zone
Season: Warm season
Exposure: Full sun
Zone: Hardy to Zone 5

Timing
Start indoors mid-February to mid-April. Transplant out or direct sow starting mid-April. Starting indoors may be more reliable, particularly if using bottom heat and maintaining optimal soil temperature at 15-21°C (60-70°F). Seeds should sprout in 2 to 3 weeks.

Starting
Sow seeds 3mm (1/8″) deep, and keep soil just moist, not wet. Thin to 45-60cm (18-24″) apart.

Growing
In spring, trim established plants back by a third to encourage new growth. Once the flowers have finished in June/early July, trim the plants back again. A second bloom sometimes follows, and this pruning will keep plants bushy and compact. After a few years, sage bushes can become quite large. Keep in check by pruning.

Companion Planting
Sage repels both the cabbage moth and the carrot rust fly, so it’s a great all around companion plant in the vegetable garden. Do not, however, plant it near cucumbers, which are sensitive to aromatic herbs.

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  • Attracts bees
  • Used as smudge

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White Sage Seeds, Known as Buffalo Sage and Bee Sage, this is the sacred sage that is bundled and burned as smudge to purify places and things.